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Thread: Noob

  1. #1
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    Default Noob

    I've been introuduced to muzzle loading guns few months ago and have been seriously contemplating getting one for my self. How would one go about doing that? What are the most important things to consider?

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    Where are you located? A lot will depend on your access to supplies.

  3. #3
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    If you are going to be buying a muzzleloader, let me recomend the savage 10ml2, u can use smokeless powder in these which lets you make longer shots more accurately. I consider them the best production ml made today.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 7magsendero View Post
    If you are going to be buying a muzzleloader, let me recomend the savage 10ml2, u can use smokeless powder in these which lets you make longer shots more accurately. I consider them the best production ml made today.
    Hidden in this reply is a caution regarding what your intended main purpose is for the ML. In some states such as here in ALaska, the Savage, because it can be fired with smokeless powder makes it illegal for ML restricted hunts, even if it is loaded with black powder while hunting.

    Most states also have minimum caliber requirements. If you main intent is to hunt, study the restrictions appropriate to the state you will hunt, if you are going to hunt with it. If it is for a hobby your options open up a bit.

    What I did to aid in my choosing after attending a Muzzleloader Hunter Training Course, was purchase a book authored by Sam Fadala, The Gun Digest Blackpowder Loading Manual. It has a wealth of information relating to all things blackpowder and a catalogue of blackpowder rifles, pistols and shotguns.

    MY first recommendation would be to take a training course, then get a book such as I mentioned, then figure out what your main intended purpose for the weapon will be and choose form the many examples available.

  5. #5

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    DITTO; What he said !!
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  6. #6
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    Well, I wouldn't dare hunting with ml just yet, for now I'm looking for something affordable and easy to operate and maintain. Hunting would be end game goal, but I figure I still have ways to go.

  7. #7

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    I'd take the muzzleloading class whether you intend to hunt or not. It's a concise intro and an opportunity to shoot in a controlled setting.

  8. #8
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    I would urge you to consider looking at the t/c omega, or the omega z3(i think) they, have been my go to choice after experimenting with sidehammers and knight inlines and other t/c (encore). I use my during every Iowa gun season muzzleloader or not.Shoot great, durrable and reasonable priceing. 100gr pryo pellets, hornady .44 cal 240 gr xtp bullets with green sabot and win 209 shotshell primmer. Williams peep since you guys cant use a scope for muzzleloader specific hunts.

  9. #9

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    Where does it say in the regs the Savage or like MLs can't be used?
    I could be wrong the regs state the following: Page 19" In addition to general hunting restrictions listed on page 18, big game MAY NOT be taken by the following methods: Hunting big game with a muzzleloader equipped with a scope, or using smokeless powder as a charge during any special season for muzzleloading firearms only."
    Page 20 "Muzzleloader You MAY NOT use a muzzleloader:
    For
    big game UNLESS it is a shoulder-mounted long gun and is at least.45 caliber or larger with a barrel thatis either rifled or smooth bore and dis-charges a single projectile.
    equipped with a scope or using smokeless powder during any permitted, registered, or special season hunt for muzzleloader only. "







    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    Hidden in this reply is a caution regarding what your intended main purpose is for the ML. In some states such as here in ALaska, the Savage, because it can be fired with smokeless powder makes it illegal for ML restricted hunts, even if it is loaded with black powder while hunting.

    Most states also have minimum caliber requirements. If you main intent is to hunt, study the restrictions appropriate to the state you will hunt, if you are going to hunt with it. If it is for a hobby your options open up a bit.

    What I did to aid in my choosing after attending a Muzzleloader Hunter Training Course, was purchase a book authored by Sam Fadala, The Gun Digest Blackpowder Loading Manual. It has a wealth of information relating to all things blackpowder and a catalogue of blackpowder rifles, pistols and shotguns.

    MY first recommendation would be to take a training course, then get a book such as I mentioned, then figure out what your main intended purpose for the weapon will be and choose form the many examples available.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by woundedknee View Post
    ...or using smokeless powder as a charge during any special season for muzzleloading firearms only....
    It's promoted for use with smokeless. You can certainly use it with black, but why bother?

  11. #11
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    It seems to me that a one sided conversation has been going on. Is anyone on this forum familar with a traditional muzzleloader???? You remember, the kind with a maple stock and octagonal barrel. I have used these for many years, much longer than the modern style in-lines have even been around. I have taken several deer with a flintlock and due to the additional restrictions/ reduced availability of Goex in its various granulations- will be using a percussion Hawken -style for moose this fall, and if time would be available, I'd get the .62 caliber trade rifle finished. Maybe I'm wrong, but the intended idea of a muzzleloader only season, with no scope, no smokeless powder, etc. was to limit the distance and make the hunt a little more challenging. Many states at one time actually called these hunts- Primitive weapons seasons. Just a thought and my opinion.

    Before you plunk down a chunk of hard earned dollars, take a walk through the Dixie Gun works catalog, over 100 different styles, types, and ignition systems.

    An example of accuracy with original muzzleloaders; " Champion marksman Hiram C. Berdan of New York, authorized to raise a regiment of sharpshooters for Federal service, began recruiting competitions in the summer of 1861. Qualified recruits had to place 10 shots in a 10-inch circle at 200 yards, firing any rifle they chose from any position they preferred."

  12. #12

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    There are lots of traditional types around, myself included. I have inlines too, but they're mostly loaners now because I almost never shoot them.

    I agree on your points about the reasoning behind the muzzleloader seasons, having spent quite a bit of time talking to the folks who set them up and administer them. But even they use inlines for the required certification classes.

    I look at it this way: Guys just starting out and probably only getting a muzzleloader for the extra hunting opportunities will almost always gravitate to the inlines, both for the similarity to guns they already own and shoot and after being barraged by advertising. Can't remember when or where I've seen an ad in the popular outdoor press for a traditional gun. Basically it's all the newcomers know, and I'm not going to hold it against them. But try to put scopes on their guns for the special seasons, and I'll sure stand up and fight. As will the guys who run the program. The principles behind the hunts is important.

    Here's the bottom line I've come to recognize: Among all the folks buying the inlines, there are a handful who get really interested in traditional guns and migrate away from the inlines. I see it as a recruiting opportunity. Guys who only shoot 3 or 4 shots a year through their inlines are beyond conversion, I think, but the guys who like it and get hooked can be "nurtured" into traditional.

    All it takes to nurture them is for us to be civilized to them, and go shooting with them. It sure helps to shoot LOTS with them. Go out and shoot around 50 shots in each session. If they don't go broke feeding modern bullets and pellets to their guns, they'll still tire of getting beat up with giant loads. Either way, loan them some balls, patches and loose powder and work with them to make them shoot right from their inlines. And of course, let them shoot your traditionals as much as they want.

    In my experience it doesn't take three range sessions to have these guys shopping for their own traditional guns. You don't have to push them toward traditional at all. They'll make the choice themselves with experience.

    In the meantime, I'm not going to criticize an inline shooter or debate him. Just create the opportunity to shoot with them and have fun with them, and the traditional guns will do the talking and make the converts that really want to stick with the sport.

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