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Thread: for the love of flyfishing

  1. #1

    Default for the love of flyfishing

    Have yet to try flyfishing on anything wild yet but I want to know what the attraction is, because equipment and gear are not cheap. Presentation of lure/fly is different from spinning/casting gear but you can catch all the same fish, right? I do understand if it is spiritual/peaceful Zen-like experiences similar to using stick bow and cedar shafts or traditional muzzleloader. If putting food in the freezer is all I want at this time, do I need to spend the money on learning this art of fishing?

  2. #2

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    If food in the freezer is the only consideration, gillnets for salmon and longlines for halibut are the most efficient. Get it done quick and go on to do something else. No disrespect intended, because I have a number of friends who do it that way. Love their fish and want it in the freezer, but have no interest in sport fishing.

    After that, it's about fun and what you like doing. I fly fish and use conventional tackle and like both. But I have a lot more fun fly fishing. No other reason to do it when I also have gillnets and longlines, but I keep on doing it.

  3. #3
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I have a bait cast rod, a spin cast, and a fly rod and use all three. But I still want to get into fly fishing more than I do now.

    A lot of the attraction of using a fly rod to me is the sensitivity. Plus they are so light.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member DannerAK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuskovich View Post
    Have yet to try flyfishing on anything wild yet but I want to know what the attraction is, because equipment and gear are not cheap. Presentation of lure/fly is different from spinning/casting gear but you can catch all the same fish, right? I do understand if it is spiritual/peaceful Zen-like experiences similar to using stick bow and cedar shafts or traditional muzzleloader. If putting food in the freezer is all I want at this time, do I need to spend the money on learning this art of fishing?
    What attracted you to fly fishing and intrigued you to price gear?

    For me it was an unexpected change of plans that put a fly rod in my hand for the first time. I was supposed to go a live concert near Detroit. Arrived at a buddies parents home and I examined the tickets and saw the dates on them were for the prior weekend. Buddy and his mom eff'd that one up. Anyway, instead of Neil Young and Crazy Horse, we were blessed with a guided float trip on a killer trout stream in northern Michigan during a hex bug hatch (the largest of the mayfly family). Brown trout were only feeding on the surface as those big bugs were hatching. A fly rod was the only way to catch them. 12 years later, 98% of the time I spend fishing fresh water, it is with a fly rod and most recently a two handed fly rod. The progression started from using a combo of spinning, casting, and fly rods for their specific purposes with the goal of catching a lot of fish. Now I only want to use fly rods and to find the method or formula for every freshwater species. Not sure if that makes sense to others, but it does to me.

    Fly fishing gear can be expensive but it doesn't have to be. Just starting out you don't need all the gizmos, gadgets, and extras hanging on the shelf. A small investment will get you on the water. There are several lightly used or new fly rod setups on Anchorage craigslist right now. If you checked Juneau's you will probably find similar results. Fly fishing and casting can be difficult to pickup and it is helpful to have a mentor or someone to learn with. I went through the school of hard knocks and taught myself after the initial exposure to it on a guided trip.

    For the love of flyfishing; it has become an obsession for me.
    Cheers,
    Dan

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    Quote Originally Posted by nuskovich View Post
    Have yet to try flyfishing on anything wild yet but I want to know what the attraction is, because equipment and gear are not cheap.
    I did not expect to like flyfishing, to be honest. I grew up in Virginia fishing with a cane pole and a string, and enjoyed it. Flyfishing seemed elitist and fussy and like there wasn't enough there to justify the considerable difference in cost. So, I took a class and was immediately hooked. I'm a nerd and there's a lot of nerd appeal there, in terms of technical knowledge and technical skills, but it's also a lot more active, gets you more intimately engaged with your surroundings, and somehow seems to bring us closer to the fish. I'm thinking a lot more about whether what I'm presenting looks and acts like food than I ever did with a spinner.

    Your mileage is likely to vary a lot, depending on what kind of person you are and what kinds of things you enjoy. I think the ticket is to take a class or get someone to take you out before you plop down a bunch of money for gear and discover that you don't enjoy it. Also, +1 to DannerAK's comment about spending a bunch of money for gear. To be honest even a low-end rod and reel can be spendy compared to spinning/casting gear, but there are some pretty good rods under $200 these days.

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    Member AKnook's Avatar
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    I personally enjoy flyrfishing because of what it takes to land a fish. First, your knots have to be right and not snap off, Casting right and mending to present the fly, fly selection. All of these done correctly will catch a fish. It gratifys me that I caught a nice fish because my knots were tied correctly, I chose the right fly and that my presentation was right on. Everything alligned correctly to cath this fish. Much more technical and rewarding IMO. I love catching fish period. I do use hardware as well but a fish caught on a fly is much more elevated to me.

  7. #7

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    As a teen I tied flies on spinning setup, threw it 10 to 12 feet and had a blast catching panfish (Michigan). I've used the flyfishing "economy" stuff on a pond and had headaches a plenty after prolonged use. I'll have to get a mentor to show me the finer aspects. Thanks everyone.

  8. #8

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    Been fly fishing for going on 40 years. Just bought my 1st rod that was over 100.00. That said for me the essence of fly casting is just that. The skill to place the fly in just the right drift to watch the fish either explode from the water on the take or just sip it in. As you can tell if possible I prefer to fish dry as much as I can. Yes it is similar to traditional archery vs. modern, there is an inherent skill that we should pass on to our kids.

  9. #9
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
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    Getting into fly fishing does not have to be too expensive. In Wal-Mart or Fred Myer you can get rod, reel and fly line packages for about $30 - $40, a good assortment of flies and leaders for $20 - $25. Even less if you go online.

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Crystal-Ri...ories/16637121

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Eagle-Claw...Combo/19341038

    (Just a couple examples.)

    Find Grayling stream and you will catch fish.

    Donít let the fly fishing snobs put you off. Itís not that hard to learn well enough to have fun and catch fish. I have taught my boys to fly fish in about 15 minutes. There are lots of people that would show you the basics of fly fishing. How to fly fish DVDs are $10-$20.














  10. #10

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    Hogfamily,
    Your photos tell the whole story. I was lucky enough to get into fly fish guiding and accumulate some pretty high end gear. The funny thing is, is that I bought an Ugly Stick rod for about $25. bucks this year and left all my G. Loomis and Sage rods at home and caught all my salmon on it. My son has fly fished all his life with $25.00 set up's to $500.00 set ups and has just as much fun with his original stuff as his high end (he was a guide as well) stuff. There are some fly fishing snobs out there but in reality fishing is fishing and fly fishing is just another technique like bait fishing, spin fishing with lures, or dip netting. Do what you enjoy and pass it on the the younger generation. Have fun. That's the whole idea...

  11. #11
    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    "I fly fish not because it's easy, but because it's hard."

    Haha....lol!

    Fish On!
    You know your not catching any fish when you start talking about the weather...


    http://www.alaskansalmonslayers.com/

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by nuskovich View Post
    Have yet to try flyfishing on anything wild yet but I want to know what the attraction is, because equipment and gear are not cheap. Presentation of lure/fly is different from spinning/casting gear but you can catch all the same fish, right? I do understand if it is spiritual/peaceful Zen-like experiences similar to using stick bow and cedar shafts or traditional muzzleloader. If putting food in the freezer is all I want at this time, do I need to spend the money on learning this art of fishing?
    I grew up fishing. Everybody in my family fishes year round. I use too commercial fish. I have been a guide saltwater and fresh water. I love fishing. One at a time or 100,00 pound sets, I dont care, its all awesome. I turned to fly fishing a few years ago to try something new. Needed to try a new way to fish. Loved it. One rod, two rod, three rod, four, and on and on. Started tying flies and then had to have a drift boat. Even spend money to go to exotic places to Fly Fish for things I never would have imagined growing up in Northern MN. Still use conventional gear to fish salmon, pike, walleye if Im back home and the fishings good. But I tend to lean towards picking up a fly rod first because of the deeper connection I get to the fish I want to catch. You have to figure out water, how it flows, structure, where fish are going to be. Then you have to figure out what they are going to eat or what you can piss them off enough with to make them bite. Then tie that fly up, drive all night, sleep a couple hours in the truck, wake up and fish. Fish just for the chance to catch something and lots of times you dont, especially steelhead fishing. Yeah fishing with bait is fun, but it became to easy. Fishing stealhead, salmon, and trout with plugs is fun, but it became easy. I guess what Im trying to say is, to quote Big Cox, "I fly fish not because it's easy, but because it's hard."
    Piscor Ergo Sum

  13. #13

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    Oh and to answer the question, No you dont need to learn fly fishing to fill the freezer. Invest in some TNT!
    Piscor Ergo Sum

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuskovich View Post
    Have yet to try flyfishing on anything wild yet but I want to know what the attraction is, because equipment and gear are not cheap. Presentation of lure/fly is different from spinning/casting gear but you can catch all the same fish, right? I do understand if it is spiritual/peaceful Zen-like experiences similar to using stick bow and cedar shafts or traditional muzzleloader. If putting food in the freezer is all I want at this time, do I need to spend the money on learning this art of fishing?
    You only need to learn fly fishing if you intend to fish on fly fishing only water

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    Member Firefisher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuskovich View Post
    Have yet to try flyfishing on anything wild yet but I want to know what the attraction is, because equipment and gear are not cheap. Presentation of lure/fly is different from spinning/casting gear but you can catch all the same fish, right? I do understand if it is spiritual/peaceful Zen-like experiences similar to using stick bow and cedar shafts or traditional muzzleloader. If putting food in the freezer is all I want at this time, do I need to spend the money on learning this art of fishing?
    Nuskovich, I like putting meat in the freezer myself. And far be it from me to suggest to anyone what they do with their catch. Quotas and limits are set for such reasons, we all have the right to keep our fair share. However, I have found over the years, it to be difficult to take a fish after I've seduced it on fly gear. And that's really what it is. The art of seduction. Taking a fish on fly is, for me, a spiritual event.
    I liken it to golf-I'm a crappy golfer by the way, and might play three times a year (good golf days are also good fishing/diving days) On t.v. it just looks like a guy whacking a ball down the fairway. But step up to the tee, and there are a million things running through your mind-your stance, your speed, your weight distribution, your follow through. Then you swing and shank it into the woods. Hard. There are so many tiny nuances to getting that great drive, or making that perfect drift. Like golf, the art of flyfishing is about the challenges. The ones you find on the river, and the ones you bring to it. It's about having composure, solving the riddle of the bite, and taking a gorgeous gamefish on minimalistic tackle. Have you ever hooked a really big fish on the wrong rod, and during the entire fight you're praying that the line doesn't break? The fight drags on and on, and when you finally land it, you have that relief, that sense of accomplishment, that sense of gratification, that pride. That's how every fish feels to me on fly.
    Then again, it's just fishing after all.

  16. #16
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    A fly rod is another tool in my arsenal. I like to catch fish and some days a fly will do it better than a spinner or bait even. If you like catching fish it doesn't hurt to expand your skillset.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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