Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Help with craigslist?!

  1. #1
    Member alaskankid13's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    anchorage,ak
    Posts
    473

    Default Help with craigslist?!

    Well I've been in the market to upgrade from my current 2005 Yamaha sx mountain viper to an 2005 or 2006 arctic cat m7. I want a 153" track and have been able to find a few on Craigslist and Alaska list.

    My dilemma is, I'm not sure how many miles is too many miles as well as, when I go to look at machines, I'm not quite sure what to check.

    Add on Alaska's list go like this...


    I have 2 Arctic Cat M-7 153's both run great, both are EFI, and both have anti stab kits installed, and snow eleminators, one has K&N air intake and egt gauges, the other one has Ice scratchers. 3500.00 each or 6800.00 for both OBO.


    Craigslist add goes like this...
    Runs great. 153 track. 2200 miles. Lots of add ons/custom stuff. $first 2300 brings it to your doorstep.

    Both are kind of a hit and miss as both do not give a lot of details. I just don't want to spend $3-4000 and regret my choice.

  2. #2
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Bring someone experienced in buying machines with yah young buck. Some things you'll want to look at, is the track runners, and the ski carbides. If either are seriously worn, knock off money from the asking price. This time of the year, you can't ride the machine, so prop the track up and run it a bit, does the speedo work? If it doesn't, than a bearing may have to be replaced, it's a pain in the butt. Check the handle bars, look at where the handle bar plate is welded to the steering shaft. Has it been re- welded or repaired? Is it bent? It might have been crashed/flipped. Those handle bar risers put alot of stress on that area. Attempt to wiggle the idler wheels, if they spin freely and/or have play, the bearings need to be replaced. If the exhaust aint stock, nor the air box, reconsider. Only buy a stock machine. Those aftermarket exhausts burn the motors up early. I honestly wouldn't buy a mountain machine with no more that 2000 miles and probably a bit less n that. Don't ever have it "delivered", how are you to locate the guy if you have problems?

    Finally, go get a cheap psi gauge and see what kind of pressure is obtained from each cylinder, and call up Arctic Cat dlrship to find out what the psi should be for that particular machine.

    If you were looking at a work sled, I've no qualms with any work machine having 5000 miles or more.

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    It's not so much how many miles a sled has, but how it was ridden. A mountain sled that has been ridden hard for 2k miles is likely going to need the engine freshened up, perhaps the shocks rebuilt and some bearings replaced. Then again it could be somebodies wife's sled that was ridden casually for 2k miles. Condition is everything, have a good idea of what items cost to replace or repair so you can tally up what additional funds you'll need if you decide to buy a paticular sled. Generally sleds that have had performance items added were ridden hard.

    There are used sled evaluation guides on line that are worth reading through:
    http://users.metro2000.net/~rmmc/usedguide.html

    The way I look at used sleds is either look towards a newer one with low miles, or an older one with lots of miles. I figure with the older lots of miles sled I know I'll be replacing alot of stuff, but I get it cheap enough to justify dumping the money into it.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  4. #4
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskankid13 View Post
    I have 2 Arctic Cat M-7 153's both run great, both are EFI, and both have anti stab kits installed, and snow eleminators, one has K&N air intake and egt gauges, the other one has Ice scratchers. 3500.00 each or 6800.00 for both OBO.
    The M7 is a great machine with a strong motor. I second Mainer's advice to borrow or buy a PSI guage and do a compression check on BOTH cylinders and see if they are within AC's specs. If they're not then a top-end rebuild is in order. ALL high-performance 2 stroke engines require top-end rebuilds periodically--usually every 3,000 miles or so. If the machine does need a top-end it's not necessarily a reason to reject an otherwise well cared for machine, you simply knock $800 the asking price and take it over to Chad at A2D Sledworks and have him do the work.

    Were it me I would look over these two machines and ask the guy "Which one's yours?" and "Who rode the other one?" im assuming the one with the EGT guage is his. Focus on the other one. It was probably not ridden as hard, especially if it was his wife's or girlfriend's. If it was a spare for buddies and guests to ride be wary.

    Before you go to look at it (or any machine) ask the guy not to start it before you get there. Pre-warmed machines are often trying to hide something. Don't start it until after you inspect it.

    Pop the hood and inspect. Put a hand (carefully) on the Y pipe. If it's warmer than ambient it was run before you showed up. Red Flag
    Is the tub clean or full of grease and pine needles?
    Is the exhaust clean or rusted out? (a bit of surface rust is normal, especially on the Y pipe)
    Remove the exhaust and verify all the springs are there. Check pipe and can for dents, cracks or broken welds. Shake the can--it should not rattle.
    Pull the belt off (or ask the owner to) and inspect the clutches. Look for nicks, pitting or uneven wear on the sheaves. Grab the secondary (the bigger one) and try and rotate it--there should be no play in it. Disconnect the spark plug wires and repeat with the primary. Bring a flashlight and closely inspect the primary spring for damage--they do break occasionally but are cheap to replace.
    When you pull the plugs to do the compression check inspect the plugs. Are they brand new (unfired)? Red Flag. The plugs should be brown to tan indicating correct air-fuel mixture. If they're shiny/dark the sled runs too rich (adjustable), if light colored--greyish tan or white, or ashy DO NOT BUY.
    Inspect the chaincase dipstick--there's a magnet on the end and a bit of metal particles is normal but if it looks like it has a black tail be wary.
    Inspect the tunnel for cracks, ripples or misaligned reinforcement plates--evidence of impact, especially near the footwells
    Inspect the rear suspension--check the rails for dings, bending or cracks, especially around bolt holes/heads. Look at the shocks and springs.
    Inspect the track for alignment and damage to the paddles. Chipped tips are normal and if a few of the paddles are broken or cracked at the base (no more than 10) that's acceptable but do note it in your negotiation and knock a hundred or two off the price.
    Check the hyfax for wear. There's a molded indicator line that runs the length of the hyfax. If they need replacing -$100
    Inspect the front suspension for damage and evidence of impact at the attachment points on the bulkhead/tub. Paint wear on the front faces of the A-arms is normal
    Inspect the ski's for damage/cracks near the post/saddle -$400 for damaged skis

    After all this, put everything back in order and fire it up. Respect the guy's machine and make your first two pulls slow to turn the cylinders over. Aside from the normal "dah-dump" from being a 2 cylinder two-stroke, it should turn over smoothly. Then give it a rip. It should start on the first or second pull. It will idle rough for a second or two but should smooth out quickly. EFI sleds will change pitch as they warm, idling fast at first and slowing to about 900-1000 RPM as they come up to temp. DO NOT TOUCH THE THROTTLE. Let the sled idle to temp.
    Inspect the clutches for engagement RPM by slowly rolling on the power until they engage and note the RPM. Repeat 3 or 4 times and take the average--when you call AC for the compression numbers ask about clutch engagement RPM as well. If engagement is more than 100 rpm above recommended, the clutches need servicing -$150

    Last thing--trust your gut. Well cared for machines are usually self-evident. If you get that nagging feeling something isn't right, it ain't.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  5. #5
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    always like the described machines as "good condition". When yah do the drive all the way out to the valley, three foot of grass has grown up around it, and the track became a home to earthworms n beetles. Pull the hood and find it chock full of pine needles. "good condition."

  6. #6

    Default

    Lots of good advice on here. Another option is to take someone with experience along. Two sets of eyes are better than one...I also think that the more mods a sled has, the lower the price should be. A trail can and aftermarket running boards are good upgrades, some of the other listed, not so much.

    kevin
    2002 Wooldridge Sport 2000, 21', 350 Kodiak Jet, "CindyLou"
    26' Olympic Sport Sedan, 5.7 Volvo, 280 Volvo, getting there, "CindyLouTwo"
    20' Alumatech Airboat
    EagleQuest Cabins and Lodge--Willow

  7. #7
    Member alaskankid13's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    anchorage,ak
    Posts
    473

    Default Help with craigslist?!

    All great info, some things I knew and other I wouldn't have even thought of checking. Thanks for taking the time for such replies!

    My riding buddies are my older brother and cousin. Both got started the same time I did with snowmachines, between the three of us we can usually figure it all out, but when it comes to going to looking at a machine we can sometimes not know what exactly were looking at till we put some miles on the machine.

  8. #8
    Member Jackson5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Chugiak, AK
    Posts
    124

    Default

    I'm in the process of buying a 2005 M7 used from a dealership. I got to give them $1,000 more and I can take it home. Now seeing Eric in AK's post I want to take another good look at it...Man I wish I read this thread before I committed what I already have. But the sled seems in really great condition. 1300 Miles on Odometer, and I couldn't find any damage or worn parts. But for performance parts it has a Boondocker Programmer and D & D Pipe. Anyone have any experience with that setup? Started from cold on second pull. Hopefully its a good machine, but I'm definitely going to have on more look through. Thanks for posting all the critical points to check on a sled.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    Alot of great information so far, I just bought a nice sled a few weeks ago off CL. Had a buddy go look it over and talk to the owner about the machine. The buddy has way more savy about everything under the hood or tract that i do. Find out a bit about the owner as well, why he's selling, what is his experance riding will also tell you about the sled ans how well it was cared for.
    Good luck

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sweepint View Post
    Alot of great information so far, I just bought a nice sled a few weeks ago off CL. Had a buddy go look it over and talk to the owner about the machine. The buddy has way more savy about everything under the hood or tract that i do. Find out a bit about the owner as well, why he's selling, what is his experance riding will also tell you about the sled ans how well it was cared for.
    Good luck
    While it is good to ask, I've come to the conclusion over the years that seemingly good people will outright lie when it comes to selling stuff. There are way too many "wife" sleds on Craig's List. Take in the whole picture when looking at a used sled. If you get an "I don't know" feeling, pass it up. Taking along someone who's done a bit of horse trading does help.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •