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Thread: Different types of Brass, with a proven load,...significant factor, or not?

  1. #1
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default Different types of Brass, with a proven load,...significant factor, or not?

    So, when I started reloading a few years back, I was using brass from factory ammo,
    Federal and Remington Brass to start,
    and I had several boxes, so, I'd use a batch of twenty, over and over,
    then I'd save other "Batches" for "Final loads,"
    (meaning, I kept that twenty from the factory box as a batch, not mixing them with any others)

    When I got a load dialed in, I'd load up twenty of them in a batch of brass, having FL sized them one time,
    and box 'em up in the old factory box, stash 'em away, well labeled, for the type hunt I'd want them for, etc.
    start working on another bullet type, for a different hunting application

    Soon after I started, I began ordering the higher end Brass, Nosler, Norma,
    and kept exacting records, on how many times FL sized, NS sized, trimmed, etc.
    Was Very Noticeable how much more uniform the more expensive brass was in every way,
    one of the best moves I ever made,...spending more on the brass

    Not wanting to break up the expensive brass batches for hunting loads,
    I kept filling up those boxes of factory brass, with loads that had been worked up with the Nosler or Norma brass

    Realizing all along, that the "Fine Tune Handloader," would have a problem with that,.....
    It's going to be a little bit different results, with different Brass used,....right??

    So,......now days, as I have had quite a bit of success with hunting/killing, one shot slam bangs, etc. using this method,...
    I'm thinking, it's not a big deal, the different brass,.....
    (honestly, it's haunting my sleep tho,....heh heh, just a little)

    Why use your high end Brass for storing hunting loads,....use it to dial in a load, then fill your other brass up with the dialed in load

    What do you guys think,....is it that big of a deal,....has anyone tested this out,....??

    My next experiment, is to start the scientific method, with this question,....
    "Dialed In Norma Brass" load,....used in Federal Factory Brass,... is it a noticeable factor ??

    or is it just range paper mania,....still all going to be fine on the "Minute of Critter" factor
    I don't get to hunt prairie dogs, at 300 yds,...so I have a fair amount of rib cage area to work with
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    It depends on the how much the internal capacity of the cases varies between brands, as well as how particular that load is to variances in case capacity.

    The only testing I've done is in the .223. My plinker load using misc headstamp brass runs 1 to 1+" groups at 100yds for 5 shots. My fine tuned loads run about 1/2" for 5 shots, but that's using different bullets as well.

    Changing brands of brass might have an affect on accuracy, or it might not. The biggest concern would be if you developed a top load with the brand of brass that has the largest case capacity for a given chambering, and then ran that load through a case that had less capacity. That certainly could run your pressures from max but safe to over max level.
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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Ah, yeah, that's interesting Paul,...

    I honestly hadn't thought of that, tho I don't spend anytime over Max at all, and can't think of a load that has been established as most accurate that is right at Max for a long time. Haven't seen the need for speed that worth pursuing
    Seems I'm usually finding a nice tight group, with sufficient velocity, anywhere from 1/2 to 1 grain below max, so I have room to play a little.

    I was mostly thinking the accuracy load I had developed, would be different in the different type Brass,
    just because of the differing wieght/thickness of the pieces

    That's a good thing to keep in mind, make sure I'm not right up there at the limit, and start doing a little case capacity measuring
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    well Al, i am not to much different then you.. EXCEPT!!!!!!!!!!!!! I dont have any high end brass. but many of my loads in the the norma and nosler brass would be compressed loads in the fed, win, brass that i seem to have a ton of.. and to be honest i have not noticed a difference in accuracy between the devloped loads of factory brass brands either. and for that matter.. not a huge difference in magnum primers be it CCI, Fed, win, etc... but


    i am NOT pushing any limits to far from the printed specs of the manuel either. i dont push for the lands, and keep all at COL per the book. i dont push past max, ( have gone under minimum though in some of my reduced loads)

    i guess what i a saying.. is my hunting loads once dialed in.. tend to stay there. and as long as every thing continues to foll over when shot with it..

    let us know how you do... i always enjoy reading your load data...
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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    opps ment to say.. my loads in fed, win factory brass would be compressed in nosler or norma... brass..

    that was one of my big issues when i purchased the nosler 6... it was loading noselr brass, when my earlier versions included other brands..
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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    42 grains of reloader 10x in the 358 winchester, or winchester 308 reisized brass didn't fill the case with a 275 grain bullet. With resized 308 norma brass, that case is completely full, but not compressed. Primer pockets were the tightest I've seen. I'm not worried.

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    If you are using once fired and neck-sized or minimally full-length resized brass, then if the brass is thicker, limiting the case capacity, then it is also probably stronger, offsetting any worries about overcharges. This being true as long as you are not at or over max to start with.

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    If you are happy with your reloads as far as accuracy with the powder, brass, bullet, primer, and OAL you are using and are satisfied with the results that you are getting in the field, then I would go with it. I would not condone working up a load with one type of brass and then change to a completely different brass with all of the other components unchanged to hunt with. This can result in a significant change in accuracy - not always, but frequently so. Also be aware that there is almost always a change in velocity with different powder lots of the same powder. To try and obviate these sources of accuracy fluctuations I: 1) purchase several pounds of powder of the same lot number 2) buy brass in 100 round lots, work up loads with 80 cases and then save the 20 best for hunting only 3) Lastly since I chrono almost all of my loads, I know what is the most accurate velocity with a particular powder so that when I have to purchase some more powder I frequently have to change the charge weight (some times up and sometimes down) in order to again reach the optimal accuracy velocity for that rifle and combination of components. Lastly, I love Lapua brass, and will preferentially use it IF it is available in the cartridge I am loading for. I have found it to definitely more expensive but in the long run, for my use more than worth the added expense. Good luck.
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