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Thread: Quilts

  1. #1
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    Default Quilts

    I don't know if anyone uses quilts in the field, but I just made one out of two GI poncho liners with Climashield 5 between them and it makes a really warm quilt to throw on top of your sleeping bag if you get cold during the night. I put 3 yds of Climashield (60" wide) inside the poncho liners...cut to 72" and the extra yard of material was turned width wise and laid on top of it long wise and the edges were sown with a couple stiches in the middle to hold the smaller piece of Climashield in place. It does not require any stitching in the middle since Climashield is stable by itself and will not bunch up...at least so far. The loft is about 2.5" where the double Climashield is and about half that elsewhere.

    I like to use a light wt for temp bag and then use the quilt on top if necessary. That system seems to provide a lot of flexibility for me.

    I also am going to try using it as an under quilt for my hammocks when using them in the fall and spring when temps are at or above freezing. I've found my Clark NX150 and Warbird hammocks are sooooo much faster and easier to use than a tent when the weather is moderate and are more comfortable than sleeping on the ground.

    Just thought I'd pass it on...I spent about $65 for the parts and the assembly took less than an hour...worth it in my opinion.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Of camping quilts and technical blankets...

    I did about the same thing, Lowrider. Made mine from 1.7 oz rip stop nylon top & bottom and used Primaloft for the batting, doubled down the middle like yours. Climashield would be a better choice as I had to sew through in spots to keep the Primaloft from shifting. I did this minimally though, so I doubt I could get away with throwing it in a washing machine or dyer. I also tapered mine at the foot end and sewed on some snaps to bunch the foot box up in colder weather. I also added extra fabric along the edges as a draft seal.

    I hate sleeping in bags with a passion and have almost always just used them as a blanket with a good pad underneath. Consequently I always use a bag that zips completely open and an extra warm pad (currently an Exped Synmat 9). When the temps drop I would convert the "blanket" back to a bag and suffer with the confined space. The quilt eliminates the option of using it as a bag but with the foot snaps and extra side fabric it seems to work just as well as a light sleeping bag. In above freezing temps I just take the quilt. Any colder, I bring a small down bag just in case. It's been fine by itself into the upper twenties though.

    The camping quilt is a little smaller and lighter than an equivalent sleeping bag but it's my preference mostly because of the unrestrained comfort. It's probably not a good cold weather solution by itself but is great to add extra warmth to your existing bag when needed. I found quite a bit of info by searching for "Camping quilt," but some people prefer the term "technical blanket."

  3. #3
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    Jim,

    I think I'm following your logic on the foot box and will probably do the same thing, maybe with velcro on the quilt and also on my down bag to keep it from sliding off during the night. I have also given some thougt to using an exped 9 mat but it seems they are fairly narrow and not cheap, but glad to hear they are warm. I'm also considering the Dreamtime pad since most of my use is on a 4 wheeler or canoe so weight is not a big factor.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  4. #4
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    I use the 25" version of the Exped. It's plenty wide for my use. Takes a bit longer to inflate though, and I agree about the price. There are a number of other options that might be better.

    I have a self inflating REI Campbed that is 3" thick, but it is anything but compact. It's also quite stiff to sleep on. Big Agnes has an insulated inflatable pad that is 2.5" thick; about the same as the Exped 7. Thermarest has several of their lightweight foil based inflatables that use the foil to reflect heat instead of regular insulation. I have a friend that used one on a Grand Canyon winter trip and thought is was fine down to the upper teens that we experienced there.

  5. #5
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    I have two REI campbeds too and mine are about 12" when rolled and heavy and I really don't get a lot of insulation from them. My wife hates them. I've gotten a roll of Insultex and I'm going to try that out as a bottom insulator when the cold comes back and see how that works. I have laid on it and I get krinkley sound when I move around on it but it definitely is a heat reflector and should help some...we'll see. Under a mat I'm hoping it will serve to break the "heat sink" effect of the gound or air when on a cot and reflect the heat back.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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