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Thread: New Rifle, Same Caliber,....redo it all, right?

  1. #1
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default New Rifle, Same Caliber,....redo it all, right?

    Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure I know the answer to this,
    and maybe it's all cool, more time at the bench, but,...thought I'd ask anyway

    Had a .243 stolen recently,
    after spending the winter working up really nice loads for about 6 or 7 excellent hunting bullets

    I'm going to buy another of the exact same rifle, so,
    how much difference will there be expected in a factory rifle, built by Tikka,
    the throat dimensions etc. (harmonics, whatever else distinguishes any rifle from another)

    Do I have to, (or "Get To") rework all those loads, for the new rifle ??

    can I take shortcuts, like just drop a grain below the old rifles powder number,
    for say an 85 gr Partition, and save some powder and bullets, getting to a good load for this new rifle ??
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default New Rifle, Same Caliber,....redo it all, right?

    I would. E tempted to use a Hornady OAL gauge and see how far off the lands the existing loads are. If the loads you have worked up are over published max then I would drop them back to a grain or so under max and work back up to them.

    I am a rookie reloader but this is how I would handle it and feel reasonably confident that I was being safe. Hope the new one proves to work as well as the one it is replacing.

  3. #3

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    I'd be surprised if the shells didn't fit the new rifle okay, unless you happened to be neck sizing. If you were puffing case bodies with maxmax loads I'd back off and find true max for the new gun. There's a chance it could be slightly different, and when you're already redlining, it doesn't take much of a change to push you over the edge.

    But if the loads weren't redlined in the old gun and they will cycle through the new one, I'd sure try shooting them before deciding to work up new accuracy loads. I'd be more twitchy if you were moving to a new brand or model of rifle because lots can be different along with the stamp on the barrel. The clearest examples I have are three 7x57's of different make that all have different max, though I found a moderate load they all like and stick with that in all of them. Another example in handguns are my two Smith 629's and my Redhawk. Fired cases from the max loads for the 629's literally fall out of the chambers on the Redhawk, they're so mild, and even loads well below max for the Redhawk will barely come out of the 629's without a hammer on the ejector rod, and Redhawk max will lock up either of the 629's every single time.

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    Default

    Tikka's are pretty consistent but the .243 can be touchy with unexpected pressure spikes for no apparent reason - If the loaded round drops right in the new rifle you are part way there - (What I would do in this case ? I'd treat the bore of the new rifle with TETRA OIL and go for it, but that's just me ....) but you'll know how "hot" your loads are compared to "standard", right ?

  5. #5
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I would. E tempted to use a Hornady OAL gauge and see how far off the lands the existing loads are. If the loads you have worked up are over published max then I would drop them back to a grain or so under max and work back up to them.

    I am a rookie reloader but this is how I would handle it and feel reasonably confident that I was being safe. Hope the new one proves to work as well as the one it is replacing.
    Lujon beat me to it. That is exactly what I'd do. However, I would never start at a maximum load. Drop a grain at least down from the max published. The Hornady OAL gauge will ensure you're not pushing the bullets into the lands - which will drastically increase pressures. If you aren't past max, and the OAL gauge says you aren't into the lands, you should be good.

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Yeah, I thought the first thing I'd do is look at the throat measurements, see how different they are,
    the first thing I imagine is different in every rifle, even from the same factory,....

    I don't do any of the Max Out loading, never needed to, for good velocity and excellent Accuracy,
    so I'm sure none of my loads are at max,...
    off the top of my head, I believe all the loads are at least 1/2 grain or more below the book max
    and none of the brass has been worked that way,

    Tho I do Neck Size exclusively, so everything will have to be cycled through the action I guess,...
    Darn, I had not thought of that before,.....and I have about 80-100 rounds loaded at present,....
    Necksized off the old rifle dimensions
    That'd be a bummer to have to shake all those bullets out, to have to FL size them and start over

    Thanks for the tips
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    Default

    I don't do any of the Max Out loading, never needed to, for good velocity and excellent Accuracy,
    so I'm sure none of my loads are at max,...
    off the top of my head, I believe all the loads are at least 1/2 grain or more below the book max
    and none of the brass has been worked that way,

    having read that.... I would just shoot them, and see how they do. No need to over think this too much....
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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