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Thread: Lindseed oil or not?

  1. #1

    Default Lindseed oil or not?

    I am refurbishing a Marlin 336 Texan...it's a straight stocked 336RC and I think that makes it a Texan. I bit the bullet and bought brand new wood for it and am wondering if I use linseed oil on the stock and then don't like it can I apply tongue oil over the boiled lindseed oil later? Or what is the best oil finish if not linseed? I do not want much if any gloss.

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    I'm no expert on wood finishing, but I did a project earlier in the summer with a homemade mixture of equal parts of boiled lindseed oil, pine tree based turpentine and spar varnish. Wooden boat builders call it "gunnel lotion". The stock was dry to the touch in about 24 hours. The next day I rubbed some beeswax on the stock and I was very pleased with the looks of it. Real tung oil takes forever to dry and darkens the wood more than boiled linseed oil. I would see no problem appling boiled lindseed oil over tung oil after the tung oil dried. When I do it again, I think I will omit the spar varnish becasue it didn't mix well with the linseed and turpentine.

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    Don't put either, they aren't waterproof.
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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Make it easy. Thinned Birchwood Casey Truoil. You can get it anywhere and it works. If linseed oil, use "Linspeed".

  5. #5

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    I used TruOil for about 40 years with complete satisfaction. But about 5 years back I started finishing muzzleloaders with tung oil finish from the hardware store (comes in gloss or satin, but I've only used satin). Lots tougher finish than TruOil, easier to use in some ways. I'm pretty sure I've bought my last bottle of TruOil.

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    I've used both tung oil and Truoil and I've found tung oil has more of tendency to run than truoil. Be careful with truoil since it does not flow out as well as other finishes. I apply both with fingers and wipe out smooth and let dry, then rough up with 0000 steel wool and use a tack rag before the next coat. I usually do 4 coats then dry them for a week and take the shine off by buffing lightly with 0000 wool. Makes a hard smooth finish that has always held for me.

    Satin Duracoat clear works on wood too but it does not soak the wood and is harder to repair if you have a ding. #3 son dropped my Browning Auto .22 and it has a shiny Browning finish on it and I was able to pretty well cover up the ding with clear Duracoat gloss on a Q tip...it is kinda a waste to mix for such a small fix but it worked pretty well.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowrider View Post
    I've used both tung oil and Truoil and I've found tung oil has more of tendency to run than truoil. Be careful with truoil since it does not flow out as well as other finishes. I apply both with fingers and wipe out smooth and let dry, then rough up with 0000 steel wool and use a tack rag before the next coat. I usually do 4 coats then dry them for a week and take the shine off by buffing lightly with 0000 wool. Makes a hard smooth finish that has always held for me.

    Satin Duracoat clear works on wood too but it does not soak the wood and is harder to repair if you have a ding. #3 son dropped my Browning Auto .22 and it has a shiny Browning finish on it and I was able to pretty well cover up the ding with clear Duracoat gloss on a Q tip...it is kinda a waste to mix for such a small fix but it worked pretty well.
    The clear duracoat trick for fixing dings is a good thing to know. Ive got enough dings that it'll make mixing up a batch worthwile.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Tung oil,French thinner and a pinch of red root powder(ocher)
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowrider View Post
    I've used both tung oil and Truoil and I've found tung oil has more of tendency to run than truoil.
    I should clarify that I "stretch" on my finishes, so there's no chance of runs. It's the old traditional way. Put on one or two drops, then use the butt of your hand to wipe it around and spread it thin until you can't stretch it any further. Heats up in the process, and aids in setting a hard finish. Only time either finish gets "brushed" on is a first heavy coat of thinned finish to penetrate the wood, and once dry the top of that gets taken off right back down to wood with steel wool before I start stretching on coats. It takes up to a dozen coats doing it the old way, but the difference is immediately obvious. That's where the old term "hand rubbed finish" comes from. Not a brush or sprayer in sight and never enough finish to run.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I should clarify that I "stretch" on my finishes, so there's no chance of runs. It's the old traditional way. Put on one or two drops, then use the butt of your hand to wipe it around and spread it thin until you can't stretch it any further. Heats up in the process, and aids in setting a hard finish. Only time either finish gets "brushed" on is a first heavy coat of thinned finish to penetrate the wood, and once dry the top of that gets taken off right back down to wood with steel wool before I start stretching on coats. It takes up to a dozen coats doing it the old way, but the difference is immediately obvious. That's where the old term "hand rubbed finish" comes from. Not a brush or sprayer in sight and never enough finish to run.
    So you use the tung oil this way?
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  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    So you use the tung oil this way?
    You bet. It works as well or better than TruOil with this ap. To be clear, I'm using Formby's Tung Oil Finish I get from the hardware store rather than pure tung oil. The pure stuff has given me issues, but the Finish has some hardeners and other stuff in it that not only makes a tougher finish, it also makes it at pretty close to waterproof, if not actually so. Haven't tired soaking finished wood in water or anything like that, but it never seems to suffer from long days in the rain.

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    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
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    I know I'll get castrated on this post for my comment, but I'm a firm believer in thinned out hand rubbed polyurathane for the Alaska climate. It hardens the wood pores in your stock and easy to do touch up later if you get a lite scratch in your stalk wood. Wet sand the scratch out and hand rub more over the ding. JMO!
    BTW, do your staining 1st to where you like the color and then hand seal it afterwards with the poly.
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Nope, no complaints here about polyurethane. Been using Varathane for quite a while. Seems pretty durable.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
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    I redid the stock on my 742 Rem over 30 years ago with poly over stain and the gun still looks like new. And I beat the crap out of that gun every year hunting with it. I have a couple lite scratches in it now, but just a wet sand and lite poly rub will fix it.
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    You bet. It works as well or better than TruOil with this ap. To be clear, I'm using Formby's Tung Oil Finish I get from the hardware store rather than pure tung oil. The pure stuff has given me issues, but the Finish has some hardeners and other stuff in it that not only makes a tougher finish, it also makes it at pretty close to waterproof, if not actually so. Haven't tired soaking finished wood in water or anything like that, but it never seems to suffer from long days in the rain.
    I redid a piano once with Fomsby's...ya know how long that took? Probably not as long as it should have taken but it seamed long then. I'm thinking I did a gun stock with it too a long time ago when my patience were , well kid like. I cleaned out the garage like 10 years ago and found that can that had been there a good while..... since our first married days and that happened when I was 18.

    My patience are much improved now so I think I'm going to give it a go on this Marlin. How do you deal with checkering?

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    Member GrizzlyH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    How do you deal with checkering?
    When I did my 742 years ago, I sifted sand thru a fine gas funnel screen and blasted the checkering. Worked perfect. You would destroy checkering if you tried to sand it. Now days they have alot less abrasive materials to blast with tho.
    I can do the impossible right away. Be patient, miracles take me a bit longer.

  17. #17
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Cover your checkering and then hit it on the last coat.A good hand rubbed stock likes to be rubbed off and on through the year.Gives your hands something to do while watching the boobtube.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Here's my line-up for gun finishes...sometimes depending upon my mood and how much time I have to deal with it. I hand rub finishes with my fingers and I probably don't rub out the Tung oil as much as Brownbear does so his technique is more successful and I will try that the next time I use Tung oil. I spray the poly on the left and have a small gravity feed gun that is dedicated to the poly application only. #3 son is building drums and is using the gloss finish. I use satin and rub it out with rottenstone on an old piece of carpet with some 10 wt food grade oil that makes a nice smooth finish with very little shine.

    I guess it doesn't matter what you use for a finish, as long as you do a proper job of preparing the wood for the finish...it'll turn out good.


    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Cover your checkering and then hit it on the last coat.
    Same here, but with thinned finish. I also hit it with the thinned first coat of finish, then stay clear of it until I hit it again with the thinned coat at the end.

    On a related note, when stripping a stock it's important to really clean the checkering before a refinish. If you do that and use the thinned coats at beginning and end, you'll be amazed how sharp the checkering turns out.

  20. #20
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    I like Danish Oil...a lot. I have 4 rifles re-done with it. I prefer it to both TruOil and tung oils.
    Whenever I bring a rifle in from the field I go over it with Old English furniture polish (I carry a small jar on trips). Though I try to be kind to my guns, I do not fret a ding or two. I think guns are meant to be used and dings add character. I would never put a "hard" finish on a rifle. It may initially protect the wood, but once the coating is breached, water gets underneath and causes problem unless you get to it immediately. With an oil finish, you just wipe on more oil and you're good to go. Also, with a ding on an oil finish, you can use water and an iron to pop out the dent, then reapply oil.
    I've heard bored infantrymen used to "bone" (wipe the smirk off your face) their rifles with a piece of hard wood or bone in order to push down the wood grain, which simply amounts to burnishing. Afterwards they would apply BLO again as usual.
    People will continue to argue wood finishes just as they do gun oils. We all have our opinions and favorites.

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