Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: .223 question

  1. #1
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,419

    Default .223 question

    When you guys are loading large amounts of .223 for let's say an AR, do you guys trim every case after tumbling or do you leave it as it is. If you do, how do you keep your patience trimming a thousand rounds of brass without twisting off

  2. #2
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    I know this aint too fancy, but I've been using the lee trimmers with a drill, I used to have an RCBS trimmer, but that just took too darn long. With the lee, it acts like a check gauge, because if it doesn't trim brass, at least it was checked. No measuring nothing, the thing also mashes down any potential burr on the primer hole, because that's what bottoms out the cutter.....the flash hole. With a drill, it's quite fast, because you can chamfer and deburr the same brass case before you remove it from the chuck.

    Other n that, I've been gravitating towards Lapua and Norma brass, and trimming has ceased to exist. When it comes to loading target ammo, no need in having precision, but with hunting ammo, I do put fourth the effort of trimming brass if needed.

  3. #3

    Default

    When I am loading once fired or range brass I trim every case if needed. If I can keep track of those fired rounds at the range I don't worry about trimming from that point forward. I try to stick with 5.56 cases exclusively as they do not seem to grow as much as the commercial stuff.
    Keep in mind this is for my bulk plinking ammo. If I'm loading for precision I check every case every time.

  4. #4
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    Thats what I was thinking of doing, trim for precision and skip for plinking. It takes days to clean a days worth of range brass, I hate to see how long it takes to trim them!

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    1,179

    Default

    I save up my empties during the non-winter months and during the winter I clean, inspect and trim all of my brass. It just makes them more uniform for loading.

  6. #6
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Bearcat View Post
    I save up my empties during the non-winter months and during the winter I clean, inspect and trim all of my brass. It just makes them more uniform for loading.
    Doesn't that make for a long brutal winter? I don't mind trimming when needed but a couple thousand rounds is a lot. Maybe it's time to upgrade to a electric trimmer.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    Doesn't that make for a long brutal winter? I don't mind trimming when needed but a couple thousand rounds is a lot. Maybe it's time to upgrade to a electric trimmer.
    Gracey Timmer works good.

    RCBS X die seems to mitgate some trimming

  8. #8
    Member Music Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    1,243

    Default

    Possum Hollow trimmer chucked in a drill press at a slow speed.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  9. #9
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    I'm thinking the next time the boy gets in trouble that I have a good chore for him!

  10. #10
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    I donít do tons of 223 but I trim with the old RCBS trimmer and it isnít bad. The trick is to forget where you put the crank and chuck the shaft up in a drill, then it donít take that long to do a couple hundred. Also a heavy taper crimp will let you get away with a lot more variation than a roll crimp if ya donĎt want to fight it as much.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Arizona Baby!
    Posts
    485

    Default

    223 is a notorious case stretcher and seperator.
    Resize-Clean-Inspect-Measure.
    If you see a visable ring about 3/4" up from the base then it is time to toss the case as it will seperate like it was cut with a tubing cutter at that ring because the round inherently stretches a little bit each time it is shot and the case always seems to stop stretching at the 3/4" mark.
    Think about pulling taffy.
    Now if you don't measure the cases you don't know how much longer they are and you run the risk of a case being .003 or more thousands too long. When that happens chamber pressures rise. If a case seperates the bottom third gets extracted but the rest of the case stays in the chamber.
    See where this is going? When the next round is chambered everything stops. Unless the firing pin sets the round off and then it gets messy.
    You're going to need to trim every third time you resize on average depending on the chamber dimensions and the pressure of your loads.
    If you mix and match brass and don't religously keep records on each batch of brass and when it was trimmed and how many times it was trimmed this round can give you fits.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I trim .223 about once a year. Just get set up and bang out enough of them to last another year.

    I probably shoot about 1000 rounds a year, but they are finicky little things I agree.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Veneta, OR
    Posts
    1,156

    Default

    AI it and quit worrying about trimming for good ......

  14. #14

    Default

    I'ld suggest shooting AR designed ammo in an AR rifle first hand. The cases on 5.56 are different than 223 Rem. so is the way the neck fits in the chamber. The 5.56 is designed for an AR the, 223 ISN'T ! http://www.thegunzone.com/556v223.html

    While both rounds may fit in the chamber they aren't the SAME. NATO approved ammo for 5.56 rifles has a head-stamp circle with a cross in the middle, making it look almost like a scope reticle.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  15. #15
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    Do they sell 5.56 dies? I am only shooting these in a AR M4. No plans on buying a bolt .223. 98% of the time I will be buying 5.56 ammo.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    I don't have an AR but I have a Rem 700V in 223 that I have shot about 7000/8000 rounds of 223/5.56 through and also a TC in 223 that has a thousand or so through it. I have never trimmed a 223/5.56 case in my life and have never experienced any problems with either rifle or either 223 or 5.56 cases. There is a difference in the 223 vs the 5.56 case as the 5.56 has thicker case walls which means less case capacity so you have to drop powder charges by 1 or 2 grs to keep the pressure down in the 5.56 case. I use an RCBS 223 die set and have had no problems. About half of the rounds through the 700Rem have been Mil 5.56 with maybe 100 5.56 through the TC. Also, the tower rifles at SCCC are Colt AR 15s, and have had tens of thousands of 223Rem run through them without problems. Most has been Rem 223 yellow box but also quite a few Fed Gold Medal.

    If I was going to trim a bunch of cases, I would use the lee trimmer in a drill press. It would make short work of it.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sandpoint, ID
    Posts
    1,969

    Default

    Just my opinion...unless you are a bench rest shooter (if you are, you probably won't be shooting .223 anyway) buy several thousand Lake City once fired from the same lot (not machine gun ammo) for cheap and drop your loads 10% and shoot till your little heart's content. LC seems to last forever and I use it for my AI guns too with zero problems since it is pretty consistant for milspec brass...it's not Lapua but it is pretty good stuff and for most of us it will do fine. Like any brass, check it once in awhile and trim if necessary. The AI reamer does a great job of stopping the need for trimming and gets you a few extra FPS if that's important.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  18. #18
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    905

    Default

    After prepping the case for the first time .......trim,debur and chafer....prime and measue

    Afterthe first firing of case use Neck sizer die only this avoids most of the trimming afterwards............

    Just Like others said

    Their is a small difference in 5.56mm and 223 Rem.........
    Alaska

  19. #19
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    When you guys are loading large amounts of .223 for let's say an AR, do you guys trim every case after tumbling or do you leave it as it is. If you do, how do you keep your patience trimming a thousand rounds of brass without twisting off
    Trim brass if needed after fl sizing. As to the comment regarding neck sizing, I personally wouldn't do that for an AR. Also I run my .223 ammo through multiple guns, so fl sizing is mandatory for me to have ammo that will fit in all the guns. I find brass trimmed to the minimum typically allows a fl sizing twice before I need to trim again.

    I use a lee trimmer mounted to my lathe. It really doesn't take that long to trim, it's the inside and outside deburring that drives me nuts. There are some 3 in trimmer/deburr tools available and I'm planning to invest in one the next time I have a large batch of brass to process.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •