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Thread: what do you think

  1. #1
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    Default what do you think

    After reading about the current record muzzle loader bear a question that has always been in the back of my mind popped up and I thought I would ask some opinions ot the muzzle loading community on here. Do you think there should be a different set of rules for record book animals that are taken by todays muzzle loaders vs the older flints and percussions.. I honestly have mixed feelings on the subject. I (originally)come from a state that still requires the use of a flint. I honestly have no issues with the new modern muzzle loaders I rather enjoy being able to hunt with a muzzle loader and not the sssssss sound of the wet powder burning in the pan but also have a fondness of the spark of the flint and the cloud of smoke....

  2. #2

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    It wouldn't matter to me, but then record books don't matter either. I have both types, but do all my hunting with traditionals because I like stalking. For me, putting a scope on a muzzleloader would be like putting a jet engine on a crop duster. I'm very happy with Alaska's prohibition of scopes in the special muzzleloader season, so long range shooting isn't a factor and traditionals are on par with the new ones. I do use the inlines with scopes during the general seasons, but there I'm having to compete with modern arms. If you restricted the record books to animals taken only during the special muzzleloader seasons, maybe I'd get interested.

  3. #3
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    BrownBear thanks for chiming in I was hoping to hear your opinion. I tend to side wih you when it comes to record books the personal side of me doesnt give a rats arse but when I would guide it was always a consideration. I guess when I seen the bear story it just kind of made me think about it a little more when I seen the muzzle loader he was using. Some of my fondest days of hunting as a youth were walking around the woods with a possibles bag and my flintlock.. Dont think I ever even killed a deer with that darn thing but I wouldnt trade those days for the world..

  4. #4

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    I'm another one lining my thoughts with BrownBears. When I'm sitting in the woods with an octagon barreled side hammer gun I find myself looking down and admiring my gun. There is just a warm fuzzy feeling that comes from hunting with an old traditional gun that can't be had with an inline gun.

    I have(should say had, gave one to my nephew) two large Iowa whitetail bucks on the wall that would make the record books if I cared anything about the record books. They were both shot with side hammer traditional guns. If the record book people decided to recognize those heads in accordance to what they were shot with I might enter them. I reckon I'd feel the same about bears if we had any.

    That being said I do have a couple of inline muzzleloaders and they are legal even with scopes in this state. However when season rolls around in October I'll be packing one of the sidehammer guns minus scope. I have had people ask to borrow one or the other of my inlines numerous times and I always oblige them but nobody has asked to borrow my side hammer guns and I'd have to say no if they did....unless if it were my grandson doing the asking then I'd be honored!

  5. #5
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    I agree with BB and EKC, two of my favorite people, but not ENTIRELY.

    I wouldn't even OWN onna those INLINE contraptions.

    Their only purpose, is to take advantage of the Special ML seasons, and still have the advantages of a Modern Rifle. So, now it aint so "special" any more.

    Might as well allow Single Shot rifles of all kinds.

    There's jist tooo, many things, that I dislike intensely, that have become popular.

    What's this world comin to?

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  6. #6

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    I kinda come at inlines sideways. With no scope they're no more capable than a traditional sidelock range-wise. Disallowing scopes for the special muzzleloader hunts not only keeps the playing field level, it gets the new guys with inlines mixed in with the traditional shooters. In my experience it doesn't take many range and field sessions to help those newbies see they bought a line of marketing malarky along with their inline, while also showing them how much more fun the traditionals are. Just take them for a long shooting session and they'll either be beat to death from shooting over 50 shots with their hot loads, or they'll run out and have to borrow cheap round balls and loose powder from you to keep on shooting.

    Pretty quick they lose interest in their own inlines and are trying to borrow your sidelock too! I've made quite a few converts to traditional guns simply by being neighborly and shooting with them, with the only fighting saved for any attempt to allow scopes in the special seasons. Guys can still use their scoped inlines during the general gun seasons, but around here at least I don't see a soul scoping up their inlines and using them rather than a modern rifle. I've done it a couple of seasons just to see what's what, but the scope is back off my inline. I loaned it to a buddy about three years back, and far as I know he hasn't shot it yet. I'm in no more hurry to get it back, so it's fine in his closet rather than mine.

  7. #7

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    I believe what puts the muzzleloaders in a class of their own is the loading of a black powder/substtute down the muzzle, they're single shot, and the fact they only have open/conventional sights. The addition of optics on muzzleloaders changed the way the civil war was fought and change the effecientcy of current muzzleloaders as well.
    I do however belive that the addition of optical sights should be allowed for persons with (doctor certified) visual handicaps, I don't think however that animals harvested with optical sights on muzzleloaders should be entered into the record book.
    I had a couple of inlines but soon lost interest and currently only have 4 percussion firearms; one shotgun one pistol. I'll put my balls against any saboted rifle at 80 yds. I also get to small game hunt and shoot 5 times more for the same price.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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