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Thread: Slight leakage during 1st batteries charge..normal?

  1. #1
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    Default Slight leakage during 1st batteries charge..normal?

    I just purchased a deep cycle marine battery and charged it up this weekend. After it was fully charged I noticed a slight seepage of fluid coming from the top of the battery (where the two rectangles are on the top).

    Is this normal or should I exchange it for a new one?

  2. #2

    Default No

    Not normal. Sounds like it has been overfilled or you overcharged it. Either way, pop off those vent covers and check the electrolyte level. If too high (from being overfilled), take the battery back and get a new one. If too low (from overcharging), add some distilled water to bring it back to the proper level.

  3. #3
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    Default

    If it is supposed to be a "sealed" battery take it back and ask for a refund.
    Tennessee

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Emu View Post
    I just purchased a deep cycle marine battery and charged it up this weekend. After it was fully charged I noticed a slight seepage of fluid coming from the top of the battery (where the two rectangles are on the top).

    Is this normal or should I exchange it for a new one?

    Did you use a deep cycle compatible charger? Fast charging boils the electrolyte and a little can seep out the vents. If in doubt go to Battery Specialists on 5th Ave and ask an expert.

  5. #5
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    Default Used Minkota charger

    I actually used a minkota charger, so I don't think its the charger... also has an auto shut off. I'll look at the levels. I got it at Sportmans Warehouse, so I may just exchange it. Thanks for the feedback.

  6. #6
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default To much

    Sounds like you charged it too fast and and it bubbled over a bit. I usually remove the covers before charging and do it in a well ventiliated area. You may have to add electrolyte.

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  7. #7
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    Default charge?

    I assumed that with my minkota charger being made for marine/deep cycle batteries I could simply plug it in and walk away. Are you saying I should have charged for a couple of hours, left it alone and then come back to charge again?

    Also, to be more accurate, it only had about 1/2 teaspoon or so of fluid. That's why I was wondering if it was even a big deal?

  8. #8
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    Current day deep-cycle chargers start with higher charging rates (bulk charge), and decrease the rate as the battery becomes charged (float charge), finally reducing to a slight trickle (maintenance charge). If your charger maintains a higher rate the electrolyte bubbles very actively and will seep out the vents. The seepage isn't a big deal but if you have a constant-rate charger you should invest in a newer one for the long-term health of your battery. These "smart' chargers have only become popular in the last few years.

    Why do you need a deep-cycle battery?

  9. #9
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    Default I'm just lazy

    Don't you love those forum questions like mine where if somebody just took a little time to call the company that made the battery to get some answers that I could answer my own question. I'm just lazy I guess. Well, ends up I have my own answer.

    The battery I got was at Sportmans Warehouse and the battery is called "Alaska Gold". It is distributed by a local company (which is nice to support) here :

    Battery Specialists of Alaska, Inc.
    1939 E. 5th Ave.
    276-5251
    Free 24-hour lead-acid battery drop-off service. Will pick up large quantities during day.


    Anyway, the guy there said what probably happened was that the fluid was over filled when made and during the charge had a small leak. He said the small leak should not be a big deal. Also, he said if there are problems with the battery to bring it in to them and they would take care of it (another nice part of going with a local company).

    So there it is.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Current day deep-cycle chargers start with higher charging rates (bulk charge), and decrease the rate as the battery becomes charged (float charge), finally reducing to a slight trickle (maintenance charge). If your charger maintains a higher rate the electrolyte bubbles very actively and will seep out the vents. The seepage isn't a big deal but if you have a constant-rate charger you should invest in a newer one for the long-term health of your battery. These "smart' chargers have only become popular in the last few years.

    Why do you need a deep-cycle battery?


    I need it for my trolling motor.

  11. #11
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default i have heard nothing but bad things

    about the alaska gold batteries. Not to bash a local company but my dad works at a RV repair shop and they throw them all away and replace with interstate, which i also have in my boat. can't go wrong there. not sure what it is about the gold's but I would not trust them after hearing second hand what kind of problems they cause in motor homes, which are the deep cycles.

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