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Thread: Remington 222

  1. #1

    Default Remington 222

    Aquired a Remington 222 from my dads colection when he passsed away. Seems like ammo is a little hard to find, Sportsmans had only one box the other day. Anyone have suggestions for some local ammo? I did find some on ammo to go.com. I have read a bit on this caliber, seems to be a thing of the past when the 223 came along. Looks like a fun gun to plink with at the cabin.

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    Lots of on-line sources until they are outlawed. Get some brass and start reloading or as a last resort have it rechambered to .223...no shortage there.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  3. #3

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    Most 222 are 1-14 twist. Many shooters have made the mistake of rechambering to 223. Most 223 ammo has bullets heavier than 52 grns. Thats about the longest bullet a 1-14 twist likes to shoot accurately. The 222 in a good rifle is capable of better accuracy than a 223 it was for many years the go-to gun for benchrest shooters, until the PPC's came onto the scene. They like 40-47 grn bullets and are very easy to reload, they are also a very forgiving round. Enjoy dads old gun and have a blast shooting it.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    Most 222 are 1-14 twist. Many shooters have made the mistake of rechambering to 223. Most 223 ammo has bullets heavier than 52 grns. Thats about the longest bullet a 1-14 twist likes to shoot accurately. The 222 in a good rifle is capable of better accuracy than a 223 it was for many years the go-to gun for benchrest shooters, until the PPC's came onto the scene. They like 40-47 grn bullets and are very easy to reload, they are also a very forgiving round. Enjoy dads old gun and have a blast shooting it.
    Yup, that rifle is a goodie for sure. I'm among the legions of varmint and benchrest shooters that lamented the fading of both the 222 and 222 mag back when the 223 came along. Maybe that's why I don't have the least interest in "black" rifles these days. Just a whole different outlook on shooting and how I use guns. I'd be more inclined to set back the barrel and rechamber a 223 to 222 than to EVER rechamber a 222 to 223. It's a really sweet round and worth any trouble you go through to buy/build the ammo. If you really want a 223, sell the 222 to someone who appreciates the round and use the buxx to buy a 223.

  5. #5

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    I assume that you have a rifle with a 700 barrel thread. If so and you really want a 223 simply order a 223 take-off barrel from someones new pet project and have a smith install it. You now have a 223 and you can put dads old gun back together at will , that way it retains it's original value.

    Mike Walker designed the 222,222 RM, 223 and 6x47 rounds for Remington as well as the rifles to shoot them. These were adopted after many sessions on the bench and trophies in the case. Mike was and still is a very accomplished benchrest shooter and a hoot to shoot with.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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    I have one in a savage model 24. If you get the little conversion units 222 will also shoot any 22 rimfire very very well. Gives you some choices.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    Most 222 are 1-14 twist. Many shooters have made the mistake of rechambering to 223. Most 223 ammo has bullets heavier than 52 grns. Thats about the longest bullet a 1-14 twist likes to shoot accurately. The 222 in a good rifle is capable of better accuracy than a 223 it was for many years the go-to gun for benchrest shooters, until the PPC's came onto the scene. They like 40-47 grn bullets and are very easy to reload, they are also a very forgiving round. Enjoy dads old gun and have a blast shooting it.
    Yeah, 1-14 inch twist.

    I learned that the hard way. I knew the 222 has been a popular cartridge, but after buying one, a cheap Savage 340, I was doomed to disappointment. I didn't know as much as I thought I did.

    I had wanted to load heavy 22 Cal bullets in it, but the 1-14" twist shot that down. 55 grain bullets wouldn't stabilize. 50 grain bullets would. That was the dividing line.

    IMO, the 222 Rem. is such a well designed case, with a long neck that handloaders like, it's a shame that the bullets you can shoot in it, because of the 1-14 twist, can't even use it all.

    The gun wasn't worth a rebarrel to a faster twist, so after I got done tinkering with it, I traded it off.

    I'm purty sure, you can make 222 brass out of 223. At least, I seen some that I thought had been done, at the range.

    Smitty of the North
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post

    I'm purty sure, you can make 222 brass out of 223. At least, I seen some that I thought had been done, at the range.

    Smitty of the North
    Yeah, most certainly. But in my experience you need to neck ream. For match shooting I used to reform 222 mag to 222, then outside neck ream with my old Maquart neck turner. Quite a bit of metal actually. When fire forming it would leave a little "step" on the inside of the neck, and with that in the right spot it formed a pretty handy bullet stop for seating depth. Haven't actually made 222 brass myself from 223, but you can fireform 222 mag to 223, so by extension....

  9. #9

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    You could take a 223 Remington barrel and cut off 1/2" then rethread and chamber for a 222 then you could shoot the bullet weight of your choice if it's compatabal with the twist you choose. Myself if I were going to rechamber a 223 barrel it would be to 221 Fireball with a little extra throat for longer bullets. See I've already got 3- 223's one being an AR platform heavy barrel varmint rifle.

    I have made 222 brass out of new 223 brass with just a little Imperial sizing wax and a run through the sizing die. Then trim to length.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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    IMO you should keep the rifle the way your Dad left it to you and do what you have to do to feed it. You will really enjoy reloading ammo for that rifle and it will mean a lot more to you in the same condition you recieved it.

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    My FIL had one that he used for almost 30 years to hunt everything out here, until the stock simply fell apart around the rifle. Then he bought a .30-30.

    Guy I work with has one and loves it.
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    I have a die made by RCBS [says "RCBS 222 REM FORM 68" on the top] that iI use to push the .223 shoulder back and then trim to length. Works great! I mark the base by removing the 3 from 223 with a dremel tool.
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    The triple deuce is fabulous. I had one when I was younger a client gave me after I shot some groundhogs out of his pasture with it. I DESTROYED that one in my youth by rechambering to .223 so I could shoot cheap FMJ ammo... Mine was a detachable mag model (721?) and .223 wouldn't fit the mag making it a clumsy single shot. I fiddled with it for a while and finally just gave it to a buddy to try and fix.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    IMO you should keep the rifle the way your Dad left it to you and do what you have to do to feed it. You will really enjoy reloading ammo for that rifle and it will mean a lot more to you in the same condition you recieved it.
    I hafta agree. Just use 50 grain bullets and lighter. Folks back when the 222 was popular, were as enamored with velocity as now, and never considered heavier bullets, plus they were less available.

    If mine had been a Remington, for example, I might have rebarreled for a faster twist. I would not have, rebarreled and chambered to 223 because it might not feed properly.

    B'sides, I don't LIKE 223s. I'm particular, discerning, and stubborn.

    Who needs a 22 CF anyway?

    Smitty of the North
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  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by sport drifter View Post
    Aquired a Remington 222 from my dads colection when he passsed away. Seems like ammo is a little hard to find, Sportsmans had only one box the other day. Anyone have suggestions for some local ammo? I did find some on ammo to go.com. I have read a bit on this caliber, seems to be a thing of the past when the 223 came along. Looks like a fun gun to plink with at the cabin.
    Boondocks in ER has several boxes on the shelf.
    or reload with 4198 and 50 gr bullet, you can order the proper brass cheap enough and 100 rds will last a life time

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    IMO you should keep the rifle the way your Dad left it to you and do what you have to do to feed it. You will really enjoy reloading ammo for that rifle and it will mean a lot more to you in the same condition you recieved it.
    Thanks everyone, the rifle is a Remington 700 with a perefect stock, topped with a Leupold scope. The best I can come up with it was bought new in the early 70's. My mom shot it a bit in those days, she liked it better than the 25-06. I will check out Boondocks tomorrrow, on the way back from the range.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Music Man View Post
    I have a die made by RCBS [says "RCBS 222 REM FORM 68" on the top] that iI use to push the .223 shoulder back and then trim to length. Works great! I mark the base by removing the 3 from 223 with a dremel tool.
    Just curious, how much hassle/danger is there in just fire-forming 222 from 223? I picked up a Contender barrel that keyholes 62g FMJ at 10 yards. Handloaded 45g look and group ok.
    Checking the barrel with a magnifying glass, you can see where the third 2 has been over stamped with a 3. And 223 brass requires a HARD snap to close the action. I'm thinking neck size, and trim to length?
    Don't want no one to get hurt, but if yore gonna have a wreck, I wanna watch.

  18. #18
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    The 223 is a longer case.

    You might end up with some neck fireformed into the barrel ????

    I think the proper way is to size, then trim, possibly' ream the necks.

    SOTN
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  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    ...possibly' ream the necks.
    That's been my experience.

    But in the case of your Contender barrel, it sounds like a bad rechamber job. If you're planning on reforming your 223 to 222 and shooting that in the existing chamber, you got troubles ahead. The shoulder of the 222 is set back quite a bit from the 223, and your "new" cases ain't going to be any happier than the gun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    That's been my experience.

    But in the case of your Contender barrel, it sounds like a bad rechamber job. If you're planning on reforming your 223 to 222 and shooting that in the existing chamber, you got troubles ahead. The shoulder of the 222 is set back quite a bit from the 223, and your "new" cases ain't going to be any happier than the gun.
    I have sent an email to Thompson to find out the twist rate on their 222 barrels. Would a slow twist rate cause the 62g to not be stabilized, but it would the lighter bullets? I will mic the fired brass when I get home, and see what my manuals say.
    Thanks,
    Don't want no one to get hurt, but if yore gonna have a wreck, I wanna watch.

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