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Thread: Bear fence setup question

  1. #1
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Question Bear fence setup question

    I'm setting up one of the ultralight bear fences from Eagle Enterprises for the first time and am not quite sure if I've got it right. Their instructions and diagrams leave a little to be desired. The part I'm not sure if I have right is the gate handles. Does this look basically correct? At first it seemed odd to me to have a piece of plastic right in the middle of the circuit, but I guess the way it works is that the fence conducts electricity only once the bear completes the circuit to the ground? If someone could let me know if I've got this right - or if I've got it wrong and how to correct it - I'd certainly appreciate it.



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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Brian, yours look different from ours, I can't really see where/how your power source is hooked up, but you should have a constant charge. I don't think your gonna get it because your not completing the circuit. Was there instructions with it? our system is a heavier system that takes two D batteries and i can feel it when I brush up against it or touch it. Also ours complete the circuit so the wires have to touch to be connected, we have no gate on ours, its low enough to step over..... CK

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    It's the electrobearguard fence from Eagle Enterprises. There are instructions, but they're not super clear (to me, anyhow), and they lack decent diagrams. It would be easy enough to not bother with the gate - really, I don't see the purpose, as the fence would have to be turned off to use the gate handles anyhow - but I'm not too inclined to mess with the correct setup too much since it is a borrowed item.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    to be sure of proper instalation... a quick test is to pee on it.. that way you can test it with out touching it.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Brian, I can't view your photo from my computer here at work, but from the way you describe it, I think you have it set up right. I have the same fence and the first time using it, the set up didn't sound quite right. I went ahead and quickly touched it with my hand, and it seemed to work all too well.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Ha! Yeah...I thought about touching it, but.... The lady at Eagle Enterprises told my wife yesterday that touching it while wearing rubber boots isn't too terrible, so I'm tempted, but I'd rather rely on the collective wisdom here.

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    Member Hayduke's Avatar
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    Does the handle have a metal core? I have used similialr for cattle and the plastic handles would have a metal core with contact points where it attaches to the wire.

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    The fence wires need to be wires in parallel not series.

    You need to have a wire going from each fence wire to the (+) on the box that way all the wires are hot. Also a wire going from the (-) to a ground rod. If you are on dry sand or rocky ground the ground rod is useless and you will need to add ground wire or wires in a location where a bear will step on it or touch it when it touching the hot wire.

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    One other thing the voltage is a one second pulse and will not hurt you. The best way to test the fence is to use the back of your finger that way the electrical pulse will pull your finger away from the wire. I do it all the time.

    Hummmmm I wonder if that explained the reason for some of my post??????

  10. #10

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    Without seeing the entire setup:

    As long as all the fence wires have a connection to the Positive output, they are energized. The handle matters not, because the Positive voltage will travel in all directions through the wire, as long as all wires are connected back to Positive. This is easy to accomplish on a circular bear fence, but not as easy on a linear (example: livestock) fence. Your ground wire goes to a ground spike and it has to be in moist soil to work properly. Most farm or ag stores sell a very cheap elec fence test light. Beats the heck out of shock therapy!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I can take a picture of the rest of the setup later if it would be helpful, but yes, the fence wires are connected to the positive output and are grounded. I'm just wondering if the plastic handle in the middle of the fence wire is going to stop the connection from working. As best as I can read the instructions, that's how it's supposed to be. Seems like it would break the circuit, but again, perhaps whatever touches the wire is what completes the circuit into the ground - sort of like why being in a car with a fallen electrical wire on top is safe, but stepping out of the car and touching the ground completes the circuit and causes a shock.

    I can do better pictures later, but I was hoping someone has this same model and can chime in on this particular part of the setup. Thanks for the feedback, all.

  12. #12

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    Tough to explain. All actual fence wires just need to eventually have some sort of connection to the Positive output. You can use 'jumper' wires between the top and bottom wires to connect them to each other. Just be sure all wires have a link to each other and finally one wire connects to the positive output post. Electricity will then be able to flow through all wires. The handles won't be 'hot' but the wire on either side WILL be hot as voltage comes from both directions toward the handles.

    The ground wire goes from the charger or controller straight to a ground spike. It shouldn't touch any part of the fence, nor does the animal have to touch the ground wire to receive a shock.

    We never use handles anyway. I just shut down the controller or remove it from the fence (no connection) when I need to get inside.

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    I'm sure you got it right Brian. Now the hard part is finding some moist ground to set it up on.

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    http://www.electrobearguard.com/files/ebgultlinst.pdf

    I have this fence. The wire does not need to make a continuous loop so the plastic handle doesn't interrupt continuity.

  15. #15
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    The wires are electrically the same point as the terminal itself since there is minimal resistance along them. Essentially touching the wires anywhere would be exactly the same as touching the hot lead directly!

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    Default get a tester

    There are a lot of little mistakes that anyone could make while assembling one and connecting the power. First time I set mine up: zero volts. I rechecked a few things, saw a dumb mistake, fixed it, and then saw my meter read voltage, I think it was 5,000 but I forget.

    I wouldn't go afield with a fence and no tester. They're cheap, small, and light. And you'll need one anyway for when you've bought your own fence. I test mine EVERY time I arm it, and when I return. Mine hasn't been swatted yet, but I assume when it does (while I'm gone) I'll know this partly because the voltage will have dropped some due to expending a big shock.

    I couldn't quite tell from your picture, but it looks like the kind of fence you borrowed has no wire (running around the fence perimeter) that is ground. Some do, some don't. The ones that don't do not work on gravel bars since the bear won't be properly grounded. If you're above the treeline camping in a rock garden, you might have the same bad luck with that unit. Mine has three wires going around the fence perimeter; the top & bottom are charged; the center one is ground - so it will work on gravel (or on dirt).

    About your specific question, I suspect LuJon is spot on. Both sides of that plastic have a wire that does connect (hopefully well) to your power. So you should be safe unless the bear daintily grabs the plastic handle and carefully unhooks it.

  17. #17
    Member polardds's Avatar
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    Default Spend $10 for a tester

    I have an electric fence around a cabin and a portable one for the plane as well. To save myself from having to self test I bought a handheld tester that lights up. You stick the probe in the ground and then attach the other end to the fence and it lights up. It is light and easy to use. It gives you peace of mind that your fence is working without having to "zap" yourself. But if you are into that then go for it. (I have seen them at Home Depot but I got mine from F and E fence in Palmer)

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    i dont use the plastic handles when out in camp. just turn it off to untie the wire from a post and turn it back on after you retie it to the post.

    a ski rope winder makes a good spool for the wire.

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    You don't need to spend money on a tester, use a blade of grass. Kneel down so your shoes don't insulate you and touch the hot wire with a long blade of grass, slide it closer to your finger until you can feel the pulse. Works better that a tester. If your in gravel or poor soil you need to install a ground ring, this works better than a ground rod. Get a length of aluminum wire (16 awg or larger will work) and run it all around the fence about 2 feet on the outside. Slightly bury it and secure it with those cheap aluminum tent stakes.

  20. #20
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    There are no requirements for the arrangement of your hot wire other than these two:
    1. All portions of the wire must connect via wire back to the hot post on your machine
    2. All portions of the wire must be insulated from the ground.

    Weave a freaking wire web if you like.

    The sprung metal gate closures are the way they are so that you don't have to bury or elevate a hot wire across a roadway to electrify a hot wire on the other side of the gate. Since the other side of your arrangement leads directly back to the + post, plastic is fine.

    Do you know what the single most satisfying sound on the planet is? After being jostled awake at zero dark thirty by your uncomfortably pregnant wife as she's off to the can yet again, and then hearing a Yelp!-twang of one of the neighbor's dumb dogs getting nuked by the moose wire strung around your garden and chicken coop.

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