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Thread: Kodiak-wood or gas

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    Default Kodiak-wood or gas

    Hunting Kodiak late October/early November along the coast, would you rather have a wood stove or gas stove in the tent for heat?

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    GAS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    combo. I've used a military sheepherder's style that uses a drip fuel and five gallon can, but will also burn wood, beach debris, and deer fat. Problem relying on wood only is it may rain every day you're there, and wood will be wet. There are also parts of the island with very little wood, other than drift wood.

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    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    combo. I've used a military sheepherder's style that uses a drip fuel and five gallon can, but will also burn wood, beach debris, and deer fat. Problem relying on wood only is it may rain every day you're there, and wood will be wet. There are also parts of the island with very little wood, other than drift wood.

    What about if a guy took an Arctic Oven with a vestibule and kept wood in the vestibule to try to dry it out? I'd kinda planned on burning wood, but this thread has got me thinking... If its possible to gather wet wood and let it dry out in a warm vestibule, would it work? I guess it may not be a bad idea to bring a back up heater, just in case, but what are your thoughts?

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I would never go to Kodiak and plan on burning wood. The Vestibule on an AO is not heated so I am not sure how well the wood under will dry out and that is only if you can find wood. In the fall on Kodiak I would rather spend my time hunting deer or bears instead of looking for fire wood.

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    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    I would never go to Kodiak and plan on burning wood. The Vestibule on an AO is not heated so I am not sure how well the wood under will dry out and that is only if you can find wood. In the fall on Kodiak I would rather spend my time hunting deer or bears instead of looking for fire wood.
    I agree, but I was kinda planning on spending the day we fly in setting everything up. I figured under the vestibule it'd at least be out of the rain, and if the door was open on the tent and the vestibule door closed, I gotta feel like it'd be a little warmer than outside. Either way, it sounds like I will need to bring some gas as a back up plan. I plan to spend every day I'm allowed to hunt out hunting, but the day we fly, I'd wanted to try to get everything set up around camp.

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    Only time I've found happiness with a wood stove on Kodiak is when we brought along several bags of charcoal. Good for sustained heat (Kodiak's wood isn't), and with a bed of charcoal under it in the stove, even moderately wet wood will dry and burn. As for drying wood in a vestibule, even with heat, how many weeks are you planning to stay there? Surface wet is one thing, but soaked-in wet will bite your plans right in the hiney.

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    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Only time I've found happiness with a wood stove on Kodiak is when we brought along several bags of charcoal. Good for sustained heat (Kodiak's wood isn't), and with a bed of charcoal under it in the stove, even moderately wet wood will dry and burn. As for drying wood in a vestibule, even with heat, how many weeks are you planning to stay there? Surface wet is one thing, but soaked-in wet will bite your plans right in the hiney.
    2 1/2. I guess I'll just tote some gas along and try to use wood to conserve gas and if it works, great, if not, gas it is...

    I like the charcoal idea, too. And, I guess a guy could always bring wood inside the tent... But, the stove/heat is more of a nicety than anything. If it works, great, if it doesn't, oh well, we're still hunting...

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    What area on Kodiak are you guys going?

    I can tell you that time of the year having a heated tent or cabin sure would be nice. Nothing like coming in from a day of hunting in blowing sideways snow and rain to a warm area and the ability to dry off.

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    We really like the charcoal for latent heat the next morning, as well as a warm tent when we get back at the end of the day. Does a better job of drying clothes than anything else, too. With critical weight, we'll leave ice behind in order to get charcoal in our weight limit. Just dandy, dandy stuff for that sustained heat.

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    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    What area on Kodiak are you guys going?

    I can tell you that time of the year having a heated tent or cabin sure would be nice. Nothing like coming in from a day of hunting in blowing sideways snow and rain to a warm area and the ability to dry off.
    I'll be on the East side of the island, I have 2 hunts, a goat tag in one area and a bear tag south of there. That's kinda why I opted to get the AO, for morale more than anything!

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    We really like the charcoal for latent heat the next morning, as well as a warm tent when we get back at the end of the day. Does a better job of drying clothes than anything else, too. With critical weight, we'll leave ice behind in order to get charcoal in our weight limit. Just dandy, dandy stuff for that sustained heat.

    So would you bring gas as a back up with the additional stove to burn it or use that weight for charcoal?

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    I bought one of the NuWay single burners from AKT&T for this trip on a hunch but was wonder last minute if the extra weight of the propane was absolutely necessary. I think the synopsis here is a big "Yes". I've been cold and wet before and that sucks the life out of a hunt. Something else, anticipating high winds, I pre-drilled and screwed each joint of the stack to keep it together just in case. Used a couple eye lag screws on the first outside joint for tie offs. Thanks for everyone's advice.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I hope you are planning on spending a good amount of time down there hunting with those tags to fill. On the bear hunt I would not use a stove, those bruisers have a wicked sense of smell and do not stick around once they figure out you are in the area.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boud'arc View Post
    I bought one of the NuWay single burners from AKT&T for this trip on a hunch but was wonder last minute if the extra weight of the propane was absolutely necessary. I think the synopsis here is a big "Yes". I've been cold and wet before and that sucks the life out of a hunt. Something else, anticipating high winds, I pre-drilled and screwed each joint of the stack to keep it together just in case. Used a couple eye lag screws on the first outside joint for tie offs. Thanks for everyone's advice.
    Put your tent back in whatever hole you can find and make one if you can not find a hole to stick it in. Use every tie out that it has and make sure your tent stakes are plenty long enough to secure it in that wet loose ground. I ended up having to cut stakes from the alders that were 2 feet long to secure my tent after it decided to fly away while we were humping a load back to camp. No fun returning to what you think is camp and not seeing anything! Granted that is not much worse than waking up in the night to the river running under your tent. Yeah I am a slow learner...

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    Geesh what is all this.... Dry.....warm...stove... Nonsense.....it's Kodiak get out of the tent and hunt.... Your not camping....amateurs....

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Geesh what is all this.... Dry.....warm...stove... Nonsense.....it's Kodiak get out of the tent and hunt.... Your not camping....amateurs....
    See if you leave all your food in the tent and eat in the tent then the bears come right to you and you do not have to leave the warm comfy tent. Don't you know anything? The key is actually getting out of your sleeping bag to go shoot the bear instead of saying I am too tired and rolling back over and going to sleep again.

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    By the end off this hunt I'll have been living in a tent for dang near two months so call me a sissy if you want. Didn't mention we're taking an inflatable to get away from the stinky camp. 2 foot stakes!

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    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Geesh what is all this.... Dry.....warm...stove... Nonsense.....it's Kodiak get out of the tent and hunt.... Your not camping....amateurs....
    I don't know if you read the part about heat or not, I'm gonna hunt every day whether there's a stove or not, but that it'd be nice to be able to come back to some warmth since I'll be there for 17 days. Oh yeah, on a more serious note, what's the best way to set up a volleyball net on the beach? We thought about anchoring one side to the keg and the other to the tiki bar... Thoughts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Boud'arc View Post
    By the end off this hunt I'll have been living in a tent for dang near two months so call me a sissy if you want. Didn't mention we're taking an inflatable to get away from the stinky camp. 2 foot stakes!
    Yep, we'll have an inflatable, too, for that reason!

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    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    See if you leave all your food in the tent and eat in the tent then the bears come right to you and you do not have to leave the warm comfy tent. Don't you know anything? The key is actually getting out of your sleeping bag to go shoot the bear instead of saying I am too tired and rolling back over and going to sleep again.
    Just remember the smoked oysters

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boud'arc View Post
    By the end off this hunt I'll have been living in a tent for dang near two months so call me a sissy if you want. Didn't mention we're taking an inflatable to get away from the stinky camp. 2 foot stakes!
    The raft will be a nice addition to your hunt and should help you guys out a lot. With the addition of your raft I would bring the tent and stove. No sense in sucking if you don't have to.

    You didn't see the wind or wet ground.

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