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Thread: Question for Metzeler owners

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    Default Question for Metzeler owners

    My wife and kids just gave me a 13 foot Juca for my Birthday(used of course) and it has a 'vent' between the bottom of the transom and the inflatable floor. It is not a tear it looks like the boat was made that way. My Brother in law has a Juca but it is an older boat according to him and has no 'vent'. It doesn't leak any water in but looks a bit wierd. Anyone else seen this?

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    i've seen "vents" in some boats like the Grabner, and it was designed to vent water out of the hull. These vents look like a flat tube that goes outside the bottom of the floor, and water escapes through this valve tunnel but can't re-enter the boat on the go.

    not sure if this is the same type of thing you have going, but i bet Brian Richardson would know. He's full of this kind of intel.

    a picture would help clarify.

    larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Bartlett View Post
    i've seen "vents" in some boats like the Grabner, and it was designed to vent water out of the hull. These vents look like a flat tube that goes outside the bottom of the floor, and water escapes through this valve tunnel but can't re-enter the boat on the go.

    not sure if this is the same type of thing you have going, but i bet Brian Richardson would know. He's full of this kind of intel.

    a picture would help clarify.

    larry
    A photo would help immensely.

    Larry, what you are describing is a "duckbill", a flat tube made of PVC raft fabric. It's designed to allow water to flow out, but not back in. You typically see them at the bottom of the transom on sport boats, but I've seen them on other boats too. It's a pretty good system, but they do let water weep back in over time, so many of them have a tie-off system to prevent that. It's used when the boat is docked or anchored, since the water only runs out when the boat is under power.

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    Working away from home this week so no chance for a photo. Thanks for replies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ytlogger View Post
    My wife and kids just gave me a 13 foot Juca for my Birthday(used of course) and it has a 'vent' between the bottom of the transom and the inflatable floor. It is not a tear it looks like the boat was made that way. My Brother in law has a Juca but it is an older boat according to him and has no 'vent'. It doesn't leak any water in but looks a bit wierd. Anyone else seen this?

    Interesting timing on your post... just got an email from a guy in England on purchasing and servicing/maintainability of same inflatable Metzeler Juca boat.

    Still have a Spezi-L kayak out back of the shop... but does not see any real use anymore - mostly sentimental keepsake.

    There where many variations on this boat... additions, subtractions, updates, accessories, fixes, etc. depending on the year of manufacture plus all the bells/whistles added to the package.

    Some had no self-bailing features or parts whatsoever; while others had an assortment of ways/means of self-bailing.

    Let's get one type of self-bailing or water draining feature that would not be an original part. "The Duckbill" is not part of this equation and should not be of consideration on a lower performance inflatable. Why? Because these are for JET-SKIS or small, low-volume racy-type hulls of very high performance. Mike (please - no offense) ---- however, I think you are confusing a duckbill scupper terminology for something a bit different. These are occasionally sold aftermarket to replace OEM or other types of '"flapper-scuffers"... but not really for this application.

    What would the factory original part or parts likely be or look like:

    1.) This would be a drain-like, valve-looking "flapper-skuffer" part placed into the fabric (normally very low to water-line) and several inches away from i-beam inflatable workmanship. You will most often find it on the lower right side when you are inside the boat looking back at the inflatable transom. In function it works just like a Zodiac or Achilles and should also have a cap on a little string.

    2.) Rarely I have also seen what is called a "Large-Flow w/ Sleeve." This will look like a short, orange Elephant trunk of sorts and is often coupled duty with a small drain like described above #1. (this is what Larry was describing)

    3. Another version is two small (like a squeeze for two or three fingers) slits on the lower corners of the inflatable transom. The floor is slightly ramped at full BAR pressures and this creates a constant high point (moving or sitting still) for continuous draining.

    At this point of its lifespan... typically you begin to show aging signs of i-beam hemorrhage, and lines of foaming leaks (think beer foam vs. bubbles.) along seams, cones, and atop the grooving of the i-beams. The other things you'll start to see are that the end cap construction for the bow and stuff like handles, molded fittings, etc. start to fall off. What I'm relating here is that she's old no matter how good the boat appears to be and a failure is probable put to hard-duty, primary use.

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    Thanks for the thorough reply. It sounds like my boat has some variation of a manufactured drain. My intention for this boat is to use it in conjunction with my jet boat, using the inflatable in small lakes and chains that I hunt, at the upstream of rivers. Inflate her and putt around on a lot less gas than firing up the jet every day. So far it holds air well and had only one leak that I re-repaired: my expectations are not high.

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    dang good post, Brian. Thanks for your input.

    lb

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