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Thread: Arrows flying in spiral patterns

  1. #1

    Default Arrows flying in spiral patterns

    So I've been shooting my bow more and more lately and I just put some broadheads on and started shooting them at the range a little bit to get used to them. The problem I have is my arrows are all over the place in about a foot radius and I can tell the arrow is flying in a spiral. I've tried with multiple broadheads on multiple arrows. So what do I need to do in order to get the arrows to fly correctly? They fly perfect with field points

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I would check your spine, sounds like your shafts are not stiff enough and with the added resistance of the broad heads the shafts flex and spiral.
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  3. #3
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    Se2cold. What kind/ size arrows are you shooting. What is your draw length and draw weight. And what kind if broad heads and weight. That may help give you a better answer
    Dave

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    I would also ask what type of rest you are using. If you are using a wisker bisket then i will say that is your problem right there. Do you have the same problem with mech heads as well?

    Sweepint
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    As stated below, give us as much information about the arrow, including the flecthing, bow and broadhead as possiable. Some fixed broadheads are hard to tune. IMO mech shoot alot strighter, (I am a Grim Reaper fan) but I have tune in plenty of fixed heads. after verification of the above it might be time to take the bow in and have it aligned, then paper tune it the rest of the way.

  6. #6
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    I interpret "spiraling" as corkscrewing. If that is the case, I've had luck countering it by rotating the broadheads so they line up differently relative to the fletchings, changing the arrow spine, or just using different broadheads. For whatever reason, some broadheads just do not seem to fly well from some bow setups...

    JM .02....

  7. #7
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    Here is a link to eastons tuning guide..a very good read on tuning. I will suggest before any attempts at paper tuning be sure you have good shooting form. No "peeking" that is looking to see where you're arrow hits the target too quickly...what happens is you start anticipating the shot...counter this by holding you bow up until you hear the arrow hit the target.. No torque on the grip..the grip is just a pivit point for a bow, at full draw the fingers of your holding hand should be loose....no death grips... practice back tension try to pull through the shot vs dumping the trigger....lay your finger on the trigger and continiously pull till release go off..you will know you did it right if you are surprised it went off.. if your hand stays on your face you are not following through on your shot..ever see a golfers club stop when it hits the ball.. Good form is essential in archery....paper testing is a great tool but with bad form paper tuning is useless as you will never get consistent wholes in the paper..
    Dave


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  8. #8

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    group test! bareshaft-fletched both field points..and then fletched fp's to fletched broadheads. I still love paper tuning but group testing is the way to go I think. Paper gets me close. And yes you can paper tune a non centershot bow!

  9. #9
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Before you mess with anything ensure that your heads are properly aligned to the shafts. A misaligned head will plane and the spin imparted by the fletching can cause the arrow to corkscrew. There are several, simple tools for checking head alignment but spinning them on their points will immediately show any significant misalignment. It could be a weak spine issue but start with the simplest stuff first, eliminate those variables, and work towards the more involved stuff.
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