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Thread: 2012 Sheep Gear List

  1. #1

    Default 2012 Sheep Gear List

    I know this has been done before and gets done every year, but somethings gotta help us pass the next week till we trek into the mountains in search of the Rams who have haunted our dreams since last season.
    I'll start...
    Feel free to throw your updated list in the thread or make any recommendations to what you would change about this list.
    2012 Sheep Pack

    Clothes
    3 Pair Socks
    2 Pair Liners
    Merino Wool Long Johns Bottoms/Tops
    2 pair compression underwear
    Patagonia Capaline T-shirt
    Shorts
    Patagonia Mtn Pants
    Fleece Jacket
    Sitka Puffy Jacket
    Sitka Stormfront Lite Rain jacket
    Helly Hansen Impertech Bottom
    Tivex Suit
    Fleece Gloves
    Leather Gloves
    Stocking Hat
    Ball Cap

    Camp
    Clip Flashlight 2 Tent
    Wiggy Sleeping Bag
    Thermarest Sleeping pad
    Cup
    Spork
    Jetboil Stove
    Fuel Canister
    Food in White Bucket
    Tooth Paste/Brush

    Pack
    Black Diamond Headlamp
    2 Windproof lighters
    2 Victornox Knifes
    Gerber Folding Saw
    TAG game bags
    2 Compactor Trash Bags
    Spice Packet
    Filter Water Bottle
    2 Liter Platypus
    First Aid/Blister/Sewing Kit
    Leupold Binocs
    Leupold Spotting Scope
    Leupold Rangefinder
    Map of Hunt Area
    GPS
    20 rounds .270 Win ammo
    Tarp
    Crocs
    Lowa Boots
    Tags
    Alaska Range Sheep Pack w/50 ft 550 cord around top frame
    Treking Poles
    Sea to Summit Dry Bag for Clothes
    Tikka T3 .270 Win
    Headnet/Bug Dope
    SAT Phone

  2. #2
    Member lab man's Avatar
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    I would add tape to that list. What I like to do is wrap a few lengths around my hiking poles. It's always good to have the sticky stuff for taping ankles if you roll one, repairing tents, etc.

  3. #3
    Member Berto's Avatar
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    Do not forget the tripod for your spotting scope as well as a knife sharpener. Otherwise your list is similar to mine. Good luck to you.

  4. #4

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    I'd drop half of that ammo....would add citric acid. I only bring a puffy jacket and merino mid layers....I never end up using fleece or softshells. I am only bringing my havalon knife and some extra blades...big knife and bone saw are nice, but not a necessity for me...if I was solo I'd probably still bring the big knife. And I didn't see a pack cover or poncho on your list...I'm trying the poncho this year since it doubles as an emergency shelter, and shade for meat.

  5. #5
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    I'd drop half the ammo as well and replace that weight with a backup stove. Also, you could get one havalon knife and shuck the two Victornox knives. Good list. I'll be building mine and referencing this thread for last minute items as well!

    Thanks!

  6. #6

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    I hate to add weight to anyone's pack but a few ounces spent on a tourniquet strapped in a place that is easily accessible may save your life someday. Casualties often occur from a bleeding extremity that could be stopped with a simple tourniquet. A bad fall could cause a compound fracture or deep gash that you could not maintain pressure on especially if you pass out. Just throwing that out there for thought....

  7. #7

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    I have a havalon but break ALOT of blades with it, plus replacing a blade is tough in field conditions with cold wet hands. Don't want to slice a thumb off doing that. The victornox weigh about the same and are just as scary sharp and tough to boot. Not much a serrated vicky knife can't cut through. Might just bring one and leave a havalon at camp for finishing work on the cape (Just in case I get that lucky). Have tape wrapped around the water bottle and in the med kit.

    Question, How important is salt for a cape? If I flesh it good will it last without salt for a couple days in a garbage bad in a cool stream or just hung up to dry? Would rather not drag 3# of salt up the hill unless necessary.

    Thanks,
    Luke

  8. #8
    Sponsor protaxidermy's Avatar
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    If you get the # 70 blades for the Havalon you will not break blades.

    They are thicker & VERY tough. Plus you can resharpen them easy.

    I use them in my shop every day. I also like that the tip is more rounded, so less holes.

    RJ Simington

  9. #9
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LGraham View Post
    I have a havalon but break ALOT of blades with it, plus replacing a blade is tough in field conditions with cold wet hands. Don't want to slice a thumb off doing that. The victornox weigh about the same and are just as scary sharp and tough to boot. Not much a serrated vicky knife can't cut through. Might just bring one and leave a havalon at camp for finishing work on the cape (Just in case I get that lucky). Have tape wrapped around the water bottle and in the med kit.

    Question, How important is salt for a cape? If I flesh it good will it last without salt for a couple days in a garbage bad in a cool stream or just hung up to dry? Would rather not drag 3# of salt up the hill unless necessary.

    Thanks,
    Luke
    You're facing the possibility of hunting sheep in summertime conditions. Expect warm weather. If you don't take proper care of that cape, either because you are unwilling or unable to bring the proper supplies with you (salt), then you should consider leaving the cape behind and doing a European mount instead. Sheep make an impressive European mount anyway. 3# of salt is skimpy enough, and forget about using the creek as a refrigerator... Your cape will likely slip the hair if you try that. Salt it or forget it. If circumstances allow, you can leave the salt in base camp and deal with it there.

    You might have a look in our trophy care section on this one. It's in Activities / Hunting / Trophy Care

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    Member lab man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    You're facing the possibility of hunting sheep in summertime conditions. Expect warm weather. If you don't take proper care of that cape, either because you are unwilling or unable to bring the proper supplies with you (salt), then you should consider leaving the cape behind and doing a European mount instead. Sheep make an impressive European mount anyway. 3# of salt is skimpy enough, and forget about using the creek as a refrigerator... Your cape will likely slip the hair if you try that. Salt it or forget it. If circumstances allow, you can leave the salt in base camp and deal with it there.

    You might have a look in our trophy care section on this one. It's in Activities / Hunting / Trophy Care

    Mike

    Very good advice. I don't think I'd rely on 3 pounds of salt to preserve the hide. If I was set on preserving the hide I would take at least 25 pounds in the truck and then race down the mountain with just the hide in my pack to get salt on it as fast as possible. Then you have a couple days to get your gear and head home.

  11. #11
    Member CtP's Avatar
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    Good idea to get a thread like this going, cuz you know we're all putting our gear together and checking it twice.

    LGraham - did you come up with a final weight figure?

    How many days do you have planned? Solo or with company? Draw or HT?

    Don't mean to pry, just curious of some details.

    I'll try and throw up a list tomorrow. Very interested to see what kind of gear and #'s folks are running this year.

  12. #12
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boud'arc View Post
    I hate to add weight to anyone's pack but a few ounces spent on a tourniquet strapped in a place that is easily accessible may save your life someday.
    Very, very good advice. I've just purchased six CAT tourniquet's and will be bringing one along FOR SURE on my hunt.

    Quote Originally Posted by LGraham View Post
    I have a havalon but break ALOT of blades with it, plus replacing a blade is tough in field conditions with cold wet hands. Don't want to slice a thumb off doing that.
    That's what the tourniquet is for. Just kidding! There is a touch of a technique to changing havalon blades but I could likely do it in the coldest of conditions or even with slimy/fishy hands. Good tip on the fatter blades too...

    I was planning on about 10# of salt for a sheep cape. Protaxidermy and hoytguy, what are your thoughts?

  13. #13
    Member CtP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boud'arc View Post
    I hate to add weight to anyone's pack but a few ounces spent on a tourniquet strapped in a place that is easily accessible may save your life someday. Casualties often occur from a bleeding extremity that could be stopped with a simple tourniquet. A bad fall could cause a compound fracture or deep gash that you could not maintain pressure on especially if you pass out. Just throwing that out there for thought....
    Good point. I would use some 550 cord. form an loop and twist with a stick, spork, even a lighter until the bleeding stops , tape / tie in place.
    I have a vac sealed trauma bandgage in my first aid kit. You can wrap the wound yourself, it has a thick sterile dressing and it locks to itself or you could just use clothes. At 3 oz it just might be worth the weight.
    I also have a wilderness EMT field guide in my kit with all kinds of good info, techniques, and interventions to use in the wilderness.

  14. #14
    Member .300wby's Avatar
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    Celox powder is another lightweight option for the possibility of bad bleeding, including arterial and even heparinized blood.

  15. #15
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    A tourniquet can be made from many things you already have with you to include your belt. One stands a great chance at loosing a limb when using a tourniquet. I pack a Quickclot sponge and a sat phone.

    Havlon blades can be changed using a stick to push off the old blades and as said the thicker ones are hard to break. I too like the 22xt blunt tip blades. They are hard to beat for caping.

    Turkey baking bags make great dry bags that weight almost nothing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    A tourniquet can be made from many things you already have with you to include your belt. One stands a great chance at loosing a limb when using a tourniquet. I pack a Quickclot sponge and a sat phone..


    +1 Steve.. I do carry a needle and stiches though, and super glue....

  17. #17
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Duct tape wrapped around my trekking poles and a sewing kit are standard gear for me and I have used them on almost every hunt.

    I also use antiperspirant on my feet to keep them from sweating and forming blisters. I keep a pair of Rocky Goretex socks with me to use if my boots get wet.

    Also BLACK sock will dry twice as fast as other colors and I will swap socks and tie the other pair on my pack to dry. Keep a pair of socks as dedicated sleep socks, so nice to have warm dry feet when sleeping.

    I will have a small tube of the new UV Aquaseal in my kit this year,, that stuff is awesome, dries in seconds in sunlight. Great for quick repairs and holes in sleeping pads and dry bags.

    Great idea to keep a few extra items at the airstrip in case you run out. I leave a can of fuel, spare rounds and some liquor and food for while I'm waiting on the plane.

    Instead of a Nalgene bottle I use those cheap, light water bottles with the flip lid.
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  18. #18
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    I have a handfull of bic lighters in my pack pocket coat so I am never without one,as others said tape,I wrap duct tape on my water bottles and electric(muzzle tape on my barrel).. Dont forget extra para chord(50 might be enough)to tie down all the tie downs on the tent in the wind also a little extra for a clothes line inside the tent at night or when good weather permits a dryout. Dont get hung up on the least amount of gear and food as possible if you are allotted 100pounds take a 100pounds just leave the extra at the drop.Also a good book....counting those squares and reading the tent label over and over really gets old after the first 48 straight hours of being stuck in the tent.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by LGraham View Post
    Question, How important is salt for a cape?
    Thanks,
    Luke
    How important is your cape? Salt is of the utmost importance...

  20. #20
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    just looked a my pack....spare boot laces(iv used para chord but to me its just not the same)....spare clevice pins,emergency space blanket...mine seconds as a tarp

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