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Thread: Bees - What to do?

  1. #1

    Default Bees - What to do?

    This evening we found a hive close to our fence line while staining our fence. These appear to be a non - aggressive type as they swarmed me several times and I was not stung, I have crossed aggressive hives before and it was painful. While working in the garden, I have had them almost land on me with no issue..
    Should I let the season go - then remove the hive this winter? Having bees around Rocks the garden!! The hive is growing and we are just a little concerned as today it would be easy to dispose of, tomorrow ( when it grows) may be not..
    Thanks for your thoughts..

  2. #2
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgrant09 View Post
    This evening we found a hive close to our fence line while staining our fence. These appear to be a non - aggressive type as they swarmed me several times and I was not stung, I have crossed aggressive hives before and it was painful. While working in the garden, I have had them almost land on me with no issue..
    Should I let the season go - then remove the hive this winter? Having bees around Rocks the garden!! The hive is growing and we are just a little concerned as today it would be easy to dispose of, tomorrow ( when it grows) may be not..
    Thanks for your thoughts..
    Bees, or wasps? Bees would be a rare thing. They're not native here, and if you have a hive it means some beekeeper nearby is bumming over the fact that his bees have swarmed and left his hive box. Bees will not survive the winter. If wasps, they are voracious predators and will help keep your garden rid of other insects and caterpillars, but I don't care to have them nesting anywhere that's likely to be a conflict with my activities. As the nest grows and they increase in number they will tend to become more aggressive/defensive.
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  3. #3

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    You maybe correct with the wasps. The nest looks like what I see as a paper wasp nest. Right now the nest is about the size of a cantaloup. For now, I will watch these critters as they do help and I can use all that i can get!! If they become troublesome, I will wait for a cool evening and take the nest down..

  4. #4
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    I had a very large one right next to my house a few years back. I ended up going out at night (in the dark) after all the wasps were in bed, and clipped it of the tree, into a garbage bag, and tightly secured it. I then tossed the bag into our chest freezer. The next day I pulled it out and my 6 year old son spent the better part of the morning disecting the hive. Just a thought if you do decide to get rid of it.

  5. #5
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    When I was back in MO. for a time, we had these orange monster wasps always flying around that were about the size of a blackhawk. We used to carry squirt bottles on our nail bags and shoot them in flight......they die immediately when hit with gasoline. Anyway we found a big nest in the attic, so one night two of us waited till after dark when they are all in the nest, one held the flashlight and one held scissors and a coffee can half full of gas. All we did was reach up and snip the mud string while holding the coffee can under it. Instant death for them nasty suckers.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  6. #6

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    Well, they have found their way into the neighbors eves, and his boy was stung. I picked up some spray today, 27 feet stand off range, this evening I will spray it down and if they die this evening, remove the buggers tomorrow..
    I like the gas idea, but they are a little high in the tree for that, and catching it in a bag - my luck would not work so well!! :-) Thanks for the ideas!!

  7. #7
    Member AKluvr95's Avatar
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    We have hornets here...
    Set two traps Monday afternoon and both traps have about the same amount of hornets in them.
    These traps were on clearance at Eagle River's Wal-Mart.
    There are posts in the bottom of the bait cup to add optional rolled up lunch meat. I did add the meat since I notice theywere showing interest in my fish smoking operations on Sunday.
    Hope this helps...
    Hornets.jpg

  8. #8

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    We had a wasp problem earlier this summer as well. They built a nest in our eve right next to sliding door out to the deck. At first it wasn't too big of a problem and because the garden was close we didn't want to get rid of them. Thought about the spray stuff, but again, didn't want the chemicals to get on the garden. So we picked up one of these from Fred's:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...3WVZE27P4KSSQ8

    Filled it up with apple juice and sugar. Worked like a champ! Super cheap and easy and effective.

  9. #9
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Haven't seen a single yellow jacket on my property this summer. The traps mentioned in post #7 are what I use. I've faithfully put 3-4 of them out every Spring spread around the property with a 10-week bait installed. Put out the traps before the temps hit 50F and the hibernating queens won't be out yet. When they do emerge from the rotten chunks of downed wood where they winter over, you'll catch them in the traps. The normally yellow stripes are very pale, almost white, on the emerging queens and each one caught is one less nest you'll step on later.

    At any rate, it's taken about 5 years to reduce the number of yellow jackets around my place to practically zero. Take out nests early when you find them. A cantalope sized nest is a really serious problem and these types of wasps are extremely aggressive. Unlike bees, a yellow jacket can sting you over and over and over again. If you inadvertently step on a nest in the woods (they love to hide them in the moss around dead trees), just a few yellow jackets can do a lot of damage. Enough stings can cause an allergic reaction and even anaphylaxis in people, even people who didn't have a previous reaction to bee stings. Anaphylaxis can kill you in a matter of minutes. If you get stung and notice rapid swelling, a spotty rash developing, or feel any tightness in your chest or throat, call 911 immediately, and then take 2 Benadryl capsules (25mg each) immediately.

    As for hanging nests, get the foaming wasp spray. Plan your attack for around 1am. You want to get lined up right on the entrance hole to the nest. Start spraying and quickly adjust your aim to plug off the entrance. Then continue to spray until the the nest is saturated from top to bottom. Leave. The next day, remove the nest and deposit the entire thing in the trash.

    Gasoline works well on ground nests. Again you have to wait until the middle of the night, then get 1 cup of gas and a little piece of lumber or plywood or a burlap sack or something that you can drop over the entrance hole. Get right up on the nest, pitch the cup of gas into the hole and immediately place your cover over the entrance so they can't escape. Vacate the area quickly as gasoline is not an instant death. The fumes from the gas will suffocate the nest after a few minutes.

    A final way to catch a lot of yellow jackets is to hang a piece of meat over a bucket of soapy water (a strip of fresh salmon skin with some fat and meat still attached works great). The meat should be hanging about an inch above the water. The wasps will land on the meat, take a bite and drop off to fly away. They'll hit the surface of the water where the soap will break the surface tension and they won't be able to get free. Works like a champ for a short term deal. If you discover a nest, this is a good way to reduce the population very quickly while you plan the nest kill and wait for the right time of night to storm their castle.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  10. #10
    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    you could try to wear the bees as a beard. i hear its quite fun!
    Semper Fi!

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Haven't seen a single yellow jacket on my property this summer. The traps mentioned in post #7 are what I use. I've faithfully put 3-4 of them out every Spring spread around the property with a 10-week bait installed. Put out the traps before the temps hit 50F and the hibernating queens won't be out yet. When they do emerge from the rotten chunks of downed wood where they winter over, you'll catch them in the traps. The normally yellow stripes are very pale, almost white, on the emerging queens and each one caught is one less nest you'll step on later.

    At any rate, it's taken about 5 years to reduce the number of yellow jackets around my place to practically zero. Take out nests early when you find them. A cantalope sized nest is a really serious problem and these types of wasps are extremely aggressive. Unlike bees, a yellow jacket can sting you over and over and over again. If you inadvertently step on a nest in the woods (they love to hide them in the moss around dead trees), just a few yellow jackets can do a lot of damage. Enough stings can cause an allergic reaction and even anaphylaxis in people, even people who didn't have a previous reaction to bee stings. Anaphylaxis can kill you in a matter of minutes. If you get stung and notice rapid swelling, a spotty rash developing, or feel any tightness in your chest or throat, call 911 immediately, and then take 2 Benadryl capsules (25mg each) immediately.

    As for hanging nests, get the foaming wasp spray. Plan your attack for around 1am. You want to get lined up right on the entrance hole to the nest. Start spraying and quickly adjust your aim to plug off the entrance. Then continue to spray until the the nest is saturated from top to bottom. Leave. The next day, remove the nest and deposit the entire thing in the trash.

    Gasoline works well on ground nests. Again you have to wait until the middle of the night, then get 1 cup of gas and a little piece of lumber or plywood or a burlap sack or something that you can drop over the entrance hole. Get right up on the nest, pitch the cup of gas into the hole and immediately place your cover over the entrance so they can't escape. Vacate the area quickly as gasoline is not an instant death. The fumes from the gas will suffocate the nest after a few minutes.

    A final way to catch a lot of yellow jackets is to hang a piece of meat over a bucket of soapy water (a strip of fresh salmon skin with some fat and meat still attached works great). The meat should be hanging about an inch above the water. The wasps will land on the meat, take a bite and drop off to fly away. They'll hit the surface of the water where the soap will break the surface tension and they won't be able to get free. Works like a champ for a short term deal. If you discover a nest, this is a good way to reduce the population very quickly while you plan the nest kill and wait for the right time of night to storm their castle.
    Thanks for the excellent write up here.. We finished the nest off, but there are still some around, yet to find any nests.. They are here somewhere!!
    I will be looking for the wasp traps this week..
    Thanks again!!

  12. #12
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    I forgot to mention that when you do your nest kill, it needs to be quick and efficient while all the wasps are home, hence the reason for doing it in the middle of the night. If you only partially kill a nest or do it during the daytime while most of them are out hunting, you risk causing the surviving wasps to "swarm" to a new site to build a new nest. They can also break into a couple groups and you can end up with multiple secondary nests. If you damage an active nest, they will pack their bags and move to a new site in a matter of hours.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  13. #13

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    I think that may have occurred as we still have a mess of these guys around.. We will be looking for the nests.. I did pick up some of the catchers you mentioned at Wally World in ER, clearance right now, anyway, we will save these for next year and see what fills them..
    Thank you for the information and direction on these guys!!

  14. #14
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    If you picked up traps and have wasps flying around, don't save them for next year. Put them out right now. You'll be amazed at how quickly you can cut the population if you have the right bait. You can either put the cotton ball in and dump on the liquid bait that comes with the trap (that stuff is very effective), or you can save that and fill the cup with apple juice, or you can put a small piece of raw meat in the bottom (a little bit of salmon works great). If you use meat or juice, the bait will only last about a week at the most. To change bait when there are wasps in the trap, take the whole trap and put it in a plastic grocery bag. Place it in the freezer overnight. The next day you can dump the dead wasps and old bait, and then rebait it and put it out again.

    JOAT, the Wasp-Slayer
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  15. #15
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Have had the yellow jackets around for a while.
    No one got stung yet.
    The did work over the raspberry blooms pretty good, so I think they help. Them & a bee that looks like a bumble bee, pollenated lots of berries.

    I kinda like having some around, just not a nest near the house.
    I consider them a "good bug" , most of the time.

    Someone near has honey bees. I see them on the clover, fireweed & some in the garden.
    3 kinds of bees in the garden, I'll try to get pictures.
    Bees:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  16. #16
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Technically not a bee, (hornet) but most of us call them bees.
    Yellow jacket:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
    Member AKluvr95's Avatar
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    We've caught over 300 yellowjackets in just under a week with just two traps. Picked up another 2 traps today and swapped out/refreshed baits. Seems there aren't too many around now...only caught 13 the entire afternoon. Soon my dogs can enjoy some rest in the back yard whithout being swarmed and getting stung on the tongue when they snap them up.

  18. #18
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKluvr95 View Post
    We've caught over 300 yellowjackets in just under a week with just two traps. Picked up another 2 traps today and swapped out/refreshed baits. Seems there aren't too many around now...only caught 13 the entire afternoon. Soon my "dogs can enjoy some rest in the back yard whithout being swarmed and getting stung on the tongue when they snap them up."
    Now that has to hurt.
    Must be several nest nearby.
    The kids like swatting them with badminton rackets (bees not dogs)

  19. #19
    Member AKluvr95's Avatar
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    I believe the nests here are well up into standing birch trees. We've seen a few pieces of gray nest fragments throughout the lawn. I couldn't imagine getting stung on the tounge. But, they shake their head a couple times, lick a couple times and go back to sleeping in the sunshine. The one dog did get so fed up with the bees she pretty much stays inside.


    Quote Originally Posted by mudbuddy View Post
    Now that has to hurt.
    Must be several nest nearby.
    The kids like swatting them with badminton rackets (bees not dogs)

  20. #20
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Shot gun the nest ?

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