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Thread: Meat Care while in the Field

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    Default Meat Care while in the Field

    I am trying to get some advice for my upcoming drop hunt. This is going to be my first remote hunt and my wifes first hunt ever. I have definitly done my research and I am very well prepared for our six day adventure for a Mulchatna Bou. The only thing that I have questions on, which is probably the most important thing that I am concerned with is how to properly care for my meat in the field. I understand what I need to do to keep get the meat dry and hung and I have a plan for a meat pole that I am going to build while I am out there, but how in the world do you keep the flies off your meat???? I have heard rumors of using pillow cases because it still allows air circullation but the flies cannot penetrate the meat, and I have heard that there is a citrus spray you can use which I have no clue what it is called. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you all for your help and good luck on the upcomming season.


    Tyler

  2. #2

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    It's citric acid, you can pick it up in powder form at sportsmanship. Just need to bring a spray bottle and mix with water...pretty simple.

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    Member gutleap's Avatar
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    Alaskan Game bags which you can buy locally. http://alaskagamebags.com/ Or Tag Game bags which you can also buy locally. http://www.pristineventures.com/products/game-bags.html

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    Or good tightknit cotton pillowcases which can often be gotten cheaply at most thrift stores...

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Whatever you do, don't buy the game bags that come rolled up like a condom. I can't remember the name of them (maybe Alaska Game Bags), but they sell them at places like Fred Meyers, and Walmart. I think Sportsman's WH also sells them. They are not tight knit enough and the blow flies can blow their eggs right through them and onto the meat.

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    I know you said you are going hang your meat. One thing you can do is cut the tundra and dig a hole, place the meat in the hole and put the tundra over the meat. The cold ground will help keep the meat and the fly's will leave. You will have to use your judgment as how long it will work. Blood and guts will draw fly so keep it away from the meat.

    Another thing you could do is make a Golden Marpin fly trap to kill the fly's.

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    Dawn2dusk, you might ask your friends if they own a copy of Project Bloodtrail. This video is one we produced that deals specifically with field care of game meat, and it covers the use of citric acid as well as other choice methods for meat care in warm climates for caribou and moose.

    You can also buy a copy of that video from this site.

    worth the $$.

    Larry

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    Member Arctic Sapper's Avatar
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    I have heard that vinegar works just as well as citric acid. Is that accurate information?

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    There must be a dozen difference types vinegar witch one are you asking about?

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Much easier to stop by Barneys and spent the $6 on the citric kit, comes with a spray bottle.

    Also recommend a meat thermometer to monitor core temps of meats and contractor bags in case you need to cool the meat off in a river.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  11. #11

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    Don't use vinegar the same way as citric acid, for two reasons:

    1. Vinegar is a fermented acetic acid and it's mostly water (heavy). It also transfers unwanted and undesirable odor and flavor.
    2. Citric acid is powder that you transport and reconstitute in the field, and it has no lasting odors or flavor.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    My father used to use vinegar on deer years ago "when needed", and never told me any about any issues he encountered. He told me it would help the meat crust up in undesirable weather conditions.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dawntodusk View Post
    I am trying to get some advice for my upcoming drop hunt. This is going to be my first remote hunt and my wifes first hunt ever. I have definitly done my research and I am very well prepared for our six day adventure for a Mulchatna Bou. The only thing that I have questions on, which is probably the most important thing that I am concerned with is how to properly care for my meat in the field. I understand what I need to do to keep get the meat dry and hung and I have a plan for a meat pole that I am going to build while I am out there, but how in the world do you keep the flies off your meat???? I have heard rumors of using pillow cases because it still allows air circullation but the flies cannot penetrate the meat, and I have heard that there is a citrus spray you can use which I have no clue what it is called. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you all for your help and good luck on the upcomming season.


    Tyler
    I use a watered down tabasco to keep the bugs off the meat and spray it as I butcher(also great for those smoked oysters that I carry.. ) and never had any bug issues.alos ust citric acid.. If I am butchering in wet areas and am concerned about meat getting a good crust I use blood to wipe on the meat to help crust in less then ideal moisture conditions..

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    Member Arctic Sapper's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info on the vinegar. I'll just go with citric acid.

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    The citrus acid at the stores is called game saver and made by indian valley meats in an effort to help people preserve there meat. It works great and is pretty cheap. I was also told you can buy citrus acid in the area of canning and jarring. We tested it agains black pepper, another popular thing to keep blow flys off your meat, and it seemed to work about the same. The difference is that the citric acid reduces bacteria growth along with fly deterent. You get two for one on what it does.
    We hung our meat for three days and put a tarp over the top to keep the meat dry and tied off the bottoms outwards to allow air circulation. We sprayed the meat liberaly and it stayed good until I dropped it off at the processor. I was told the meat was in very good condition so I imagine I did the right thing to preserve it in the field. Another thing we did was rinse the meat off in a fast moving creek and before we sprayed it we wiped as much water off the meat as we could. This cleaned all the grass and leaves and also cooled the meat pretty fast.
    Another old trick that works pretty good with the flys is to hand it and then start a small fire up wind of it. Lat green spruce over it and smoke the bugs away. I havent personally used this meathod but would in a pinch.

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