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Thread: M-11 9mm Help

  1. #1
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    Default M-11 9mm Help

    I have an M-11 9mm that is made by the S.W.D Corporation from Atlanta, Ga

    I don't know squat about this gun and am trying to learn the value of it. It is in pretty good shape but there is some scratches on the dull matt finish.

    Can any of you guys help me out?

  2. #2
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    registered class III select-fire model, or standard over-the-counter semi-auto model??

    I can tell you a bit about the class III models, but not familiar with the semi's.

    Does it fire from an open bolt, with a fixed firing pin, or fire with a closed bolt?

    ruffle

  3. #3
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    Semi auto. Over the counter I think. It was given to me when a friend passed so I don't know much. I have never fired it yet.

  4. #4
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    With the mag out of the well, and checking the chamber for certainty that it's not holding a cartridge, when you pull the bolt atop the receiver back to cock it, does it lock open, or slide back closed, but cocked?

    The early semi-auto Ingram, RPB, and perhaps even SWD M-11 9's (all of which were initially made in Marietta, Georgia, and have some colorful history behind them) fired from an open bolt, much like the class III models. )(Original M-11's had a much faster firing rate than M-10's, and, unlike the M-10 that fired 9mm or .45 gov., the early select-fire M-11s fired .380/9mm Kurz at a rate of 1200 rds/cyclic minute, or 20 rds/second).

    There were some very quick, dirty and easy (read: 'illicit') home 'remedies' that could cause these to fire as full-auto's, though not 'selective fire,' per se', as the more proper/legal class III's did.

    Because of this potentially unintended feature, BATFE read the riot act to said manufacturers, and the semi's became a closed bolt gun, instead of their original design... And BATFE lived happily ever after...

    The old open bolt semi's are still around, (you'll note them for sale or trade, typically for inflated prices, in Shotgun news, etc., every once in a while), and have become, not too surprisingly in a capitalist country, more valuable for their government-defined 'deficiencies'..

    In either case, there should be a slide safety on the lower receiver, near the trigger guard. It's been years since I owned a class III model (had two different M-10's over time, both by RPB, and both in 9mm). I believe that sliding the safety forward provides for 'fire' and backward provides for 'safe.'

    There were early 32 rd. mags mde by the manufacturer that were pretty fair to use. There was a smith in Ohio who had taken Walther 40 rd MPL mags, and modified them; they were preferred, but spendy.

    The gun was initially marketed in selective-fire to the CIA in the 50's and came with a variety of toys; an 'assassination case' for those failed foreign policy moments in S. America, and rather poor suppressors (silencers), some of which were initially made by Sionics (spelling??).

    It was a quick-to-strip weapon, that came apart into 3 pieces (bolt, upper receiver, and lower received), for discarding in times of perceived need. Surprisingly accurate (at least mine were) with a six inch bbl, of which roughly 2" protruded from the upper receiver, and military style front blade and rear peep sight. Parkerized in a dark green to black finish. The full-auto/select-fire models came pre-threaded for a flash suppressor or silencer. They came from the factory with an extendable 'wire' rail stock (fixed rail stock on semi's) and had alternative Israeli-style wood stocks that I always preferred. Cheap to build. 960 rds/cyclic minute in full-auto. (= 16 rds/second).. (Can you say 'Expensive wholesale case-lots of ammo"??) Relatively jam resistant, unless the extractor pin wears out (loses its tempering through use), or you have a friend give you a primer-only home-load (dangerous and perhaps even embarassing, depending on who's watching...)

    Issues: Extractor pins wear out easily, and your neighbors construct all kinds of paranoid conspiracy theories about you when you own one... 9mm cartridge is virtually worthless, especially with 115 grain ball ammo, in terms of serious stopping power. (One might6 wish to question the U.S. government as to why they converted to it in the first place, other than to appease friends of Berretta's). Lastly, a blow-back semi-auto weapon that's shooting super-sonic military ball ammo is NEVER 'quiet,' so unless using sub-sonic ammo with the various models, and a decent suppressor, all that could be hoped for was a reduction in decibles.

    Semi-auto model should have a 16" bbl.

    ruffle

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