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    Default flatland

    Advice: Dipping for four day, what would happen to my reds if I put salt on my ice to keek the fish cold until I get home?

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    Quote Originally Posted by flatland View Post
    Advice: Dipping for four day, what would happen to my reds if I put salt on my ice to keek the fish cold until I get home?
    Uhhhh, do you mean "get home" as in at the end of the day? Or do you mean until you get back to wherever "cal" is?
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    Default flatland

    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    Uhhhh, do you mean "get home" as in at the end of the day? Or do you mean until you get back to wherever "cal" is?
    Back to Wasilla

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    Quote Originally Posted by flatland View Post
    Back to Wasilla
    Depends on a whole lot of variables if you ask me. I'd imagine your fish would be OK for 3 or 4 days if you're conscientious about getting more ice to replace the ice that melts, but it kind of depends on how much care you take in packaging the fish that you're icing. By applying salt to the ice it will make the fish colder than if you just put it on ice alone, but how well it will keep depends on how much care you take of the fish in the first place and while it is iced. I don't think I'd do it for 4 days, or even 3, but I'm pretty finicky about my salmon.
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    Default flatland

    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    Depends on a whole lot of variables if you ask me. I'd imagine your fish would be OK for 3 or 4 days if you're conscientious about getting more ice to replace the ice that melts, but it kind of depends on how much care you take in packaging the fish that you're icing. By applying salt to the ice it will make the fish colder than if you just put it on ice alone, but how well it will keep depends on how much care you take of the fish in the first place and while it is iced. I don't think I'd do it for 4 days, or even 3, but I'm pretty finicky about my salmon.
    Thanks. Will use a lot of ice, will bleed before iced.

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    just remember you can't make sugar out of s*it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flatland View Post
    Thanks. Will use a lot of ice, will bleed before iced.
    I'd bleed as soon as you catch the fish.
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    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    WAIT, since when does salt and ice work together to keep something cold?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ret25yo View Post
    WAIT, since when does salt and ice work together to keep something cold?
    Salt drops the freezing point of water. Ever make home made icecream?
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    cool, you learn something new everyday!!

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  11. #11

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    I would head, gut and belly pack with fish ice. If you cant head them gut and gill at least and belly pack them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ret25yo View Post
    cool, you learn something new everyday!!
    We always put a layer of salt down in the beer cooler to keep them beverages extra cold!
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    Salt drops the freezing point of water. Ever make home made icecream?
    To expand on this... the salt melts the ice faster and creates a salty brine which can stay liquid below the temp freshwater freezes. Liquids are denser and are more efficient at pulling the heat out of your ice cream ingredients than packing it with plain ice.

  14. #14

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    Why do some people remove the gills? Seems like I've heard something about bacteria, but it's not something that I do.

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    As a South Florida saltwater fisherman, the need to properly cool and handle fish in this hot environment is extremely important. The technique that I have used for a long time is to make a brine by adding sea water to a cooler of ice until I had a nice slurry to which I would add (bled out) fish. Once you get a proper mixture of ice and water it stays good for a long time but you still need to keep an eye on it so it doesn't get too watered down. You don't want 'ice water' you want 'watered ice' if you will. Just enough sea water to allow the fish to sink into the ice without forcing them down. I learned this technique watching 'Offshore Adventures'. The always brined their catch for a day or two prior to cleaning claiming that it improved the taste and texture of the fish and made them easier to clean.

    Since then I have also read that it is best to use clean ice only, no brine solution. This article claimed that the use of a brine degraded the texture of the flesh by partially freezing it since the brine allowed the temperature to drop below 32 degrees. This article was written regarding selling sushi grade fish commercially so I'm really not sure what the best answer is. I guess if I were you I'd just stick with clean, cold ice and lots of it. Keep an eye and don't let it turn to ice water and keep the fish buried in it and you will be in good shape.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    Why do some people remove the gills? Seems like I've heard something about bacteria, but it's not something that I do.
    Like any guts, the gills spoil faster and give off a fishy odor sooner. We fish all over and sometimes keep our fish on ice for days. If we have the option we head them and belly pack them, but if regs require we leave the heads on, we gut/gill/belly pack. As long as you keep them belly packed and keep them covered in ice they will stay good for a few days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    Salt drops the freezing point of water.
    Just to clarify... While adding salt does lower the freezing point of water, it does not lower the temperature. So, if your ice is 28-degrees, adding salt will not make it 20-degrees. You will just have a 28-degree ice/saltwater slurry.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod in Wasilla View Post
    Just to clarify... While adding salt does lower the freezing point of water, it does not lower the temperature.
    Actually it does. Try it.
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  19. #19

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    The saltwater that melts from the ice can't be colder than the ice itself. The salt simply allows the water to remain a liquid at temps colder than 32 degrees F. So if the ice is, let's say 25 degrees, and you add salt, then I believe that the water that melts from the ice can be as cold as 25 degrees and still remain unfrozen. The above is 3/4 from what I know to the true and 1/4 of what I believe to be true

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    Pure water when it melts is 32 degrees F.

    It collects salt if you add salt and becomes 32 degree saltwater, but is now capable of being colder and still liquid.

    Then the colder ice that remains removes heat from the saltwater, lowering its temperature well below 32 if you have very cold ice and lots of salt, so you get 20 something degree ice water.

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