Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: CZ 52 Marvel or Mystery?

  1. #1
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default CZ 52 Marvel or Mystery?

    I have a CZ 52 rifle. It belongs to my nephew, in my hands for my own education about the piece and for load development and testing. The gun represents an innovative era in arms from the Czechoslovakian people, utilizing some tried and true ideas in arms as well as some rather innovative changes. It is gas operated, short stroke piston system with a piston/op-rod concept but the gas piston is an annular ring around the barrel at the gas port derived form the German Walther guns. The operating rod is a curved stamped steel, sleeve around the barrel, acting directly on the bolt carrier. It uses a trigger/fire control assemble copied from our M1 Garand. It is removed the same way the Garand/M14 trigger assembly is removed. Pull back and down to extract the entire assembly from the stock. It uses a 10 round detachable box magazine with the AK-47 type of latch. It locks up by way of a tilting bolt but different than most in that it uses to strong lugs in front of the bolt, rather than the rear.
    It is easy to disassemble, among the best I've ever seen. It is a very strongly built, milled steel receiver. Similar to the original Russian AK. The top cover which is easy to remove and expose the innards is also a milled steel piece. Another unique idea is the push button operated, folding bayonet.

    It is likely most unique in the cartridge it fires. An unusual but similar in many ways to other cartridges of military arms of the time, 7.62x45. This cartridge seems to be derived from others in the way the rifle was. It uses the Russian M43 bullet, at 123 grains, and the same case head size but a 45MM long case vs the 39MM case of the Russian M43 round.

    Original ballistics, as far as I can determine, were 123 grains at 2450 fps. This is about 150 fps faster than the 7.62x39 from the same barrel length.

    When firing the rifle, the bolt carrier recoils into the top cover under spring tension exposing the open forward half of the receiver. It uses a very strong cross bar with a curved notch in the center for an extractor and a fixed steel ejector. The rifle ejects to the left and forward, one of its unique characteristics.

    Ammo is virtually impossible to find with the exception 1950's vintage corrosive, Berdan primed, steel cased mil-surp. This rifle has a decent barrel and I wanted to stay with non corrosive primers. I have located a supply of new brass and even found a sizing die on ebay. I'll be in the ammo business soon.

    It is just an oddity but my nephew calls it his zombie rifle. I'll have pics and an update down the road when I get my brass and dies.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  2. #2

    Default

    This rifle should also have a metal upper hand guard and a side-folding bayonet. ALL ammo loaded for it was corrosive and was poorly stored. Usually mil-surplus ammo fires about 20-30% of the time, lots of duds. It's an excellent caliber and with the increase in power is roughly in 30-30 range. I'm sure ole "Uncle Murphy" can make iy go bang ! LOL
    They are fun to shoot too !
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    931

    Smile

    Hello Murphy and hope all is well in your camp,

    I'd have to say oddity, scarcity/rarity, with some familiarity.

    The VZ-52 from Manufacturer Cz. was headed for 'no-longer-in-service' cosmoline before it was really a viable battle rifle. Models where rebuilt and made to fire 7.62x39. Those guns ended up on the unreliable side if magazines ended up mismatched.

    Originals were well cared for, however did not have chrome-lined barrels. Corrosive, old, and unfortunately unreliable ammo (unlike Czech 7.62x54 and 7.62x39 ammo being reliable) is what was surplussed years ago. This ended up with these surplus rifles in somewhat disrepair, unless it was issued in the grease or well maintained.

    I've fired one finding it accuracy-wise on par with an everyday rack Russian Mosin Nagant M91, M-38 or M-44. Guess ammo is now becoming the issue, but what comes around goes around - so maybe this will change.

    Wonder how difficult/involved a reliable re-work to 7.62x39 would be? Guessing not easy enough, or perhaps the gun would have soldiered on just a bit longer. You could always convert it to the VZ-52/Murphy!

  4. #4
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    Thanks, Brian. Good to hear from you. I'm doing well, enjoying part time retirement. I hope all is well in your camp.

    Actually I took this on for the challenge and experience. My e-bay die turned out to be a 54R. Misprint!! No harm. I called my friends at HDS (Huntington) and they are going to supply dies soon. Also Starline made a run of brass for Buffalo Arms (why I don't know) They sell 7.62x45 brass for about the price of gold. I priced out a 100 rounds of loaded ammo to the guns owner for $200. He said Ok. So it will come together. The gun was never really a battle rifle at all. I think palace guards only. From 1952ish to 1959. The 1957 convert to the 39 mm case killed the ammo. The cartridge isn't really an extended 39 it has different dimensions so correct dies will be welcome.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •