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Thread: Boots for hunting the slope...

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    Premium Member AZinAK's Avatar
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    Question Boots for hunting the slope...

    I will be doing a float hunt on the Ivishak the last week of August, through the first week of September. I was planning on taking my Meindl hunting boots and hip boots, but my dad asked if those knee boots that are "decent" to hike in that are being marketed would be the way to go? What's everyones opinion that has hunted up there and done some hiking around? Thanks in advance.

    AZinAK

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    Everyone's definition of "decent" is going to be different. If you're gonna wear em for miles and miles, get them and wear them for a few hikes, if they're comfortable for him then the answer is yes, they are fine. Stick to what is comfortable for you. I have commented negatively for some boots because of my personal experiences....take it for what its worth. Good luck on your hunt, awesome to see someone taking the old man out on an adventure!
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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Depends on where you go and what kind of terrain... hard to beat a good set of hunting boots and some "overshoes" like Neos River trekkers for swampy areas or stream crossings. A float hunting buddy of mine always wear breathable waders...always...and swears by them.

    I can hike for a bit in Lacrosse Alphaburly or Mucks but I don't like to- especially packing meat.

    YMMV.
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Personally I have to take my hunting boots (like Meindls) no matter where I hunt. It is nice however to be able to bring the "Tuffys" along just incase you swamp the Meindls by accident and need them to dry out. Of course I'll always have the hippers too.

    Some guys almost never use anything else but the Tuffys and are happy with them. I can wear them for awhile but not really for that long. Need to feel something firm on my feet....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member AKducks's Avatar
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    I've hiked the 5 miles off the road up on the slope 3 times in extra tuffs and was fine. but thats what I grew up hiking and hunting in so I'm used to it.

    that being said extra tuffs are now made overseas and I've heard the quality has gone way down.

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    Member bigdog's Avatar
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    I always take both my meindls and the hip boots on this trip, I have done this trip many times and the kneehighs arent high enough to cross the Ivyshak in too many places. If you are really tough take a pair of keens or crocs and use them to cross the river, this will save alot of weight. If you are floating you will want the hip boots or breathable waders no questions about this.... I use the keens for when I have to cross the river and then put my meindls on and chase after those bou, but I then leave the waders at camp for the float part of the trip...Nice to have the keens or crocs for camp shoes as well sucks to put the boots on to go take leak in the middle of the night... Good Luck

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    theres a cool boot that is designed by a guy locally in soldotna. The website is www.bushboot.com and it has a gortex wader that rolls up and down. so you have a small hip wader and a decent hiking boot in one. Check em out they are pretty neat

  8. #8

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    Last year my hunting buddy used a pair of Cabelas Tundra boots hunting 922 with me. He liked them so much I bought a pair this year to hunt in 920 for moose and maybe the Chandalar shelf for bou if they show. I think the boots are a good compromise between a wader and a hunting boot. Not perfect for either, but better than carrying an extra pair around. Mine arrived today and seem to fit well. They're a tad bit wide which is good for me and fit like a breathable stocking foot hip wader with a solid sole and 12" boot covering the neoprene foot area.

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    Premium Member AZinAK's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replies. Everyone seems to have valid points and experience behind what they do. I'm beginning to lean toward something like these http://wiggys.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=5 since I only want something for when I am crossing semit deep water, and regular hiking boots for everything else. My dad feels the same. Thanks again everyone.

    AZinAK

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZinAK View Post
    Thanks for all the replies. Everyone seems to have valid points and experience behind what they do. I'm beginning to lean toward something like these http://wiggys.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=5 since I only want something for when I am crossing semit deep water, and regular hiking boots for everything else. My dad feels the same. Thanks again everyone.

    AZinAK
    The flatter areas of tundra can hold water like a sponge. I used Muck Boots the whole time, but we didn't float, so hip boots might make since to have there along. But your Mendeils may become super saturated in no time. All depends on terrian. They don't take up much room so might be good to have. All I wore was muck boots, I swear, comfy and no probs packing around a pack each day. I have woody sport muck boots, and the winter arctic muck boots. Both have great soles for traction, but the arctics seem to be taking more time to break in, has more rubber up around the heel I think. Great boots though both of them!

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