Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29

Thread: fogging a Suzuki DF140

  1. #1

    Default fogging a Suzuki DF140

    Anybody know the proper way to fog/winterize a Suzuki DF140 outboard? No mention of it in the manual, strange...

  2. #2

    Default

    Not so sure that 4 strokes need fogged.
    We never really grow up, we only learn
    how to act in public

  3. #3
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,070

    Default

    Who the hell fogs?
    The smaller that government becomes, the bigger my support for it will be. The opposite is also true.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    659

    Default

    You do not fog 4 stroke's at all, is what i have been told be the shops

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  5. #5
    Member Alaskanmutt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    871

    Default

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...=1#post1149553
    Link to a downloadable factory manual for the DF 140
    2000 Bayliner Ciera Express 2452
    5.0 Mercruiser Alpha 1

  6. #6

    Default

    Well I guess I'm confused then. I formerly had a Yamaha 4 stroke, and both the manual and my mechanic were pretty clear about fogging the motor as part of winterization. AND, you were supposed to remove the spark plugs and put oil in there too, but I never did that part due to laziness. Justification seemed simple enough, it's important to coat the cylinder walls with oil before letting the powerhead sit and do nothing for the next 6 months come September. But now with my Suzuki DF140 there's no mention of this in the user or service manuals, so I'm scratching my head. One person told me I could drill a small hole into the plastic section of the throttle body and just squirt storage oil into there, then cover up with a piece of tape, etc. but I'm reluctant to do so. There is the saying, "Outboards don't die, their owners kill them".....

  7. #7

    Default

    To make sure I'm not crazy, I just went to the Yamaha site and looked up my manual from 2004. Sure enough, it says fogging is "mandatory" as part of winterization to prevent engine damage from rust build-up in the cylinders.

  8. #8

    Default

    Buy a can of the aerosol fogging oil, pull the spark plugs and coat the cylinder. Turn the eninge over by hand and coat again. Dump some Seafoam into your fuel tank.

  9. #9
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska - I wasn't born here, but I got here as soon as I could!
    Posts
    2,747

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by grsimmon View Post
    Well I guess I'm confused then. I formerly had a Yamaha 4 stroke, and both the manual and my mechanic were pretty clear about fogging the motor as part of winterization. AND, you were supposed to remove the spark plugs and put oil in there too, but I never did that part due to laziness. Justification seemed simple enough, it's important to coat the cylinder walls with oil before letting the powerhead sit and do nothing for the next 6 months come September. But now with my Suzuki DF140 there's no mention of this in the user or service manuals, so I'm scratching my head. One person told me I could drill a small hole into the plastic section of the throttle body and just squirt storage oil into there, then cover up with a piece of tape, etc. but I'm reluctant to do so. There is the saying, "Outboards don't die, their owners kill them".....
    Don't go drilling any holes in the throttle body!!!!!!!! Just do as rhorn says and you'll be good to go.
    Last edited by Frostbitten; 07-25-2012 at 14:43. Reason: spelled rhorn wrong

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    All-I-SAW, AK.
    Posts
    717

    Default

    Yah, do not drill holes!!

    Call any of the Suzuki dealers, ask for the service department, speak to a mechainic, and then follow their advice..

  11. #11

    Default

    Finally was able to winterize the DF140. Driveway solution for fogging: remove the flushing bolt by jet foot grease zerk, squirt in dish soap to lubricate the rubber water impeller. Remove starboard cowling; loosen port side cowling just enough to be able to get at spark plug #4. Remove all spark plugs, spray fogging oil a.k.a. "storage oil" into each hole. Using electric starter, turn engine over for 1 second, repeat spraying, bump starter for another 1 second to be sure oil is well distributed. Replace all spark plugs and caps, replace the flushing bolt by the zerk, done. Brown's Point recommended to me that each spring, remove the plugs again and briefly crank the powerhead to avoid any possible hydraulic lockup inside the pistons. Such a lock could potentially damage the motor, I believe the connecting rods but I could be wrong.

  12. #12

    Default

    After having done quite a few outboards & inboards its all pretty basic as you've found. No mention in previous posts about how much fogging oil to squirt into cylinders; I believe on the cans we use it recommends an ounce per cylinder. Since there's not a practical way to measure, a shot of about 8 seconds seems to do the job.
    we also "spliced" 2 of the small red straws together; some of the outboards have a pretty deep recess to the sparkplugs (some Hondas especially).
    I'm also amazed at how tight some folks crank in their sparkplugs! No need to have them so tight they can't be removed with a standard 3/8 ratcheting wrench.

    As mentioned by someone else, adding seafoam to the fuel supply (or stabil, etc) should be done; we also do add seafoam to the crankcase oil on both outboards & inboards.
    Grease any/all zerks (you might find some you didn't know were there unless the motor is tilted up), test & disconnect batteries (after storing boat with outboards or drives "down"). Check condition of lower unit oil and done!

  13. #13

    Default

    I was pleasantly surprised (relieved) that I didn't need a straw for my can of fogging oil. It came out in a tight stream and I was able to easily shoot it into each plug hole. 4 seconds per hole, done twice for about 8 seconds total sounds about right and what I did as well. The plug holes for the DF140 are pretty far back in there, about a good 6-7 inches so I was concerned in the beginning about just making a big mess with the oil. But it turned out to be easy, and I'll sleep better for the next 8 months. Agreed on the plug tightness, easy does it.....

  14. #14

    Default make sure gas tank is completely full

    If the gas tank is not completely full, condensation will form frost by pulling the moisture out of the air inside the fuel tank, the frost will then melt at breakup and enter the gasoline as liquid water. If the tank is completely full of gasoline, then there is no air and therefore no source of moisture. Don't know if the DF140 has a carb, if it does then don't forget to drain the carb bowls as mentioned in the other winterization thread. if it does not have a carb, then do people drain the fuel rail or injection body or whatever there is?

  15. #15
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    3,404

    Default

    Fuel injected engines (or at least some of them) don't like to run out of fuel. I would avoid that.

    I am not outboard savvy, but you should not turn the engine over (on these new motors) with the spark plugs not grounded as it could cause you some electrical issues. I will squirt the fogger in and then use the emergency pull rope to turn the motor over - or put the plugs and the wires back on and hit the starter and shut off emmediately.

    As for the torque on the plugs - use the manufacture's recommended torque - plugs have a locking ring that needs to compress to seat fully. More than that and you could potentially break a plug off in your block.

  16. #16
    Member hoose35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Soldotna, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    1,823

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    Fuel injected engines (or at least some of them) don't like to run out of fuel. I would avoid that.

    I am not outboard savvy, but you should not turn the engine over (on these new motors) with the spark plugs not grounded as it could cause you some electrical issues. I will squirt the fogger in and then use the emergency pull rope to turn the motor over - or put the plugs and the wires back on and hit the starter and shut off emmediately.

    As for the torque on the plugs - use the manufacture's recommended torque - plugs have a locking ring that needs to compress to seat fully. More than that and you could potentially break a plug off in your block.
    I am just curious, but doesn't turning the motor over with a rope have the same effect as the starter turning it over?
    Alaskans for Alaska

  17. #17
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska - I wasn't born here, but I got here as soon as I could!
    Posts
    2,747

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    I am just curious, but doesn't turning the motor over with a rope have the same effect as the starter turning it over?
    In either case, if the kill/deadman switch is used, the motor will turn over, but wont fire.

  18. #18

    Default

    I'm not sure if it matters that much if the gas tank is filled or not at time of winterization, especially if you use a fuel stabilizer like Marine Stab-il, etc, and in conjunction with an external water/fuel seperator. Any condensation that gets into the gas should be taken care of by those two. But it does seem like "full is better" to at least reduce the amount of condensation. You're supposed to run the treated gas through the engine for about 10 minutes just before fogging, thus eliminating any need to drain the lines. I never run the motor dry, because then you have vacant spaces (lines, filters, etc) that attract moisture. Since it's obviosly located post-water separator, that moisture can cause problems with the injectors

    By completely removing the plugs during fogging, I think the grounding issue is avoided, though it might be the case if you leave the plugs in and are just removing the wires (and hence have ungrounded plugs). I would definetly not start the motor up in my driveway with the plug wires attached, not even if I immediately shut it off. I know it's probably harmless, but that freaks me out and it's a lot of fast, immediate friction on the rubber water pump impeller. By doing it with plugs out, it's just a nice slow rotation that doesn't put much stress on that impeller (I use dishwashing soap injected into there to be safe). But I'm glad it's been brought up and I'm curious about this now, so I just wrote to my contact at Brown's Point and see what he says. I'll post when he responds.

  19. #19
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Whitehorse Yukon
    Posts
    1,100

    Default

    Had an issue fogging my Opti 150 this year.
    Last weekend I ran it upstream to get the stabilizer through the system. Brought it home. Next day went to fog it, and it wouldn't turn over by hand. I suspect a bit of water in the water pump locking the impeller? I thought it was drained, at least I did what I always do. Fogged the cyclinders anyway, although I couldn't move them. Hope its going to be ok.
    Kind of lost a bit of sleep over this.
    No Donny, these men are nihilists, there's nothing to be afraid of.

  20. #20
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Dirty little town near the end of the road
    Posts
    1,720

    Default

    The DF 140's have (3) internal anodes on the port side, if you run in the salt they should be removed and cleaned ocasionally, I typically check mine every year and I only spend limited time in the salt water. I clean them with a wire wheel on a bench grinder. But could be done by hand. In any case they dont mention it in the manual either, at least not that I ever found.............I guess if you are running a jet you are probably not in the ocean very often.....so likely not a concern....
    “There is no wealth but life.” John Ruskin

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •