Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: The "Art" of netting a salmon......

  1. #1
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default The "Art" of netting a salmon......

    I guess I say "Art" because I do believe there is a bit of skill involved to do it properly. And I also say netting a "salmon" because a lot of these fish seem to know what a net is by the time they make it up the river where we, in turn, try to net them again.

    I am not professing to be one that knows everything about netting a fish, but every year it amazes me to watch, what seems to be avid fishermen, not really know what to do when it comes to netting a salmon. I will only state what I believe is a "good" way to net one, but if what you do seems to work just fine, then no need to read any further. I am only posting this as a way to help those that may be having some difficulty, as I've seen far too many fish lost do to waaaaaay too much effort put forth into trying to net a fish.

    First off, like I said, although I believe even a small rainbow, or dolly would be leery of seeing a net come his way, and would try his best to avoid it. But a salmon on the other hand, has potentially been swimming and dodging nets for miles and miles and knows what to look for...or should I say look "out" for. So, when the fish seems tired, rolls to it's side, and is about ready to net, do not let the net, or should I say the mesh, or bag, into the water as the fish approaches. You don't want to give the fish anything else to see and be afraid of in its panic. This can be accomplished by just barely grasping a bit of the mesh and holding it lightly against the handle just slightly below the loop. While waiting for the fish, basically point the loop of the net at the fish holding it just above water level. I really don't see any reason to put any part of loop or net into the water at all.

    Secondly, when you make your move, don't drop the loop and mesh into the water under, over, or behind the fish and try a big broad sweep to try and "scoop" it up. If you do this you are immediately fighting the current of the river against the loop and the netting which can be substantial. When you try to "scoop" up the fish this way it is usually way too slow for a net savvy fish. Instead, wait until the fish comes to the surface, hold the loop and mesh above the water until the very last moment, when, at the same time, you let the mesh loose from your fingers, and with the loop, try to "knife" the water as close to fish as possible with a very quick and easy little "jab" type scoop, where the loop just barely dips under the water and the fish. By knifing the water with the loop, there is almost no resistance, and you are basically just using the loop to make a quick "hook" around the fish surrounding him with the mesh.

    After the fish is in the net, no need to really lift the net and fish high out of the water. Just lower the loop against the netting closing it off, and pull it towards shore. Many times, especially if you are to release the fish, I just like to grab the mesh itself and hold it and the fish against the shore. While still in the water, the fish will remain calmer while removing the hook.

    This may sound complicated and I may not be explaining it well, but it really is quite easy. Personally I have netted even kings by myself this way much to the amazement of onlookers. Again, not because it was some great feat, but just because many have never seen it done this way. Just think of this....the less movement you make with the net, the less chance you have in loosing the fish. If done properly, usually netting a salmon can be done on the first or second try.

    Good Luck...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  2. #2
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,852

    Default

    I have a different approach that is very effective. I think any time you thrust or scoop the net you are inviting trouble. I've seen hooks pulled when snagged on webbing and fish flop out and away, among other things. I put the net in the water well ahead of the fish being ready to be netted, with as much underwater as I can, hoop open toward the fish. Then I have the angler simply play the fish into the waiting hoop, and a quick yank backwards closes the net and the deal. I don't lose fish, ever, if the angler can get the fish into position. As long as the hoop and net are in the water and not moving, the fish don't seem to pay them any attention.

    My $.02 anyway. I won't let other people net my fish unless I know they know what they are doing, either. I've lost too many to sloppy net jobs. The over-the-top scoopers are the worst. I don't even know how they logically think this is going to work....lol.

  3. #3
    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    In a van down by the river
    Posts
    2,039

    Default

    Well I'll bite, here's my take on how I net fish, if you are going to retain the fish, play it out till it rolls on it's side. Have the person with the net stand below the fish far enough away it doesn't feel threatened. Once the fish is ready to be netted dip the net into the water all the way to the bottom, and turn or walk the fish down to the net, like 4merguide states the current creates drag but, I have seen to many fish turn and run down stream for no reason at all, so I feel it is the best position to place the net. If done correctly this works 100 percent of the time. From a boat I more or less do the same thing but try to get under and behind the fish as much as possible because again it seems to me that is the most likely direction they will run. Jabbers will do nothing but lose fish, they can see every thing that is going on and fast movements create panic for fish.

    by the way if you don't intend on keeping the fish please use a rubber landing net instead of nylon, it is healthier for the fish.

  4. #4
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Fishnphysician posted a great narrative on this a few years back. I just spent about 10 minutes searching for it but couldn't find it. Maybe he'll chime in...

  5. #5
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    [QUOTE=kenaibow fan;1148711]Jabbers will do nothing but lose fish, they can see every thing that is going on and fast movements create panic for fish.

    I did use the term "jab" because that's the only thing I could think of. But it's more like a very quick dip (just under the surface of the water) and hook around the fish.....not a jab at the fish her and there, over and over again like I think you are referring to.

    I actually saw a guy slap the net at the fish the other night with the loop parallel to the water, straight down from above. Literally like an open handed slap, but from above, flat to the surface of the water. I was amazed...
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  6. #6
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coho slayer View Post
    I don't lose fish, ever, if the angler can get the fish into position.
    I would think that with this method that would be a big "If"....lol.

    But I do however agree that the netter and the angler should be in sinc. When the angler sees that the netter is netting the fish, he should try and lower the fish down into the net.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #7
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,690

    Default Netting

    All good stuff, thanks for the timely discussion.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    I would think that with this method that would be a big "If"....lol.

    But I do however agree that the netter and the angler should be in sinc. When the angler sees that the netter is netting the fish, he should try and lower the fish down into the net.
    Jab or scoop, the netter can't do anything until the angler gets the fish into position.

  9. #9
    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    In a van down by the river
    Posts
    2,039

    Default

    [QUOTE=4merguide;1148719]
    Quote Originally Posted by kenaibow fan View Post
    Jabbers will do nothing but lose fish, they can see every thing that is going on and fast movements create panic for fish.

    I did use the term "jab" because that's the only thing I could think of. But it's more like a very quick dip (just under the surface of the water) and hook around the fish.....not a jab at the fish her and there, over and over again like I think you are referring to.

    I actually saw a guy slap the net at the fish the other night with the loop parallel to the water, straight down from above. Literally like an open handed slap, but from above, flat to the surface of the water. I was amazed...
    yeah I know what you mean, I was thinking anther good word for it would be poke………… I don't know I think people forget some times that water refracts the light and so the angles don't line up………..better off to just plain lead the fish to the net

  10. #10
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by extrema View Post
    Jab or scoop, the netter can't do anything until the angler gets the fish into position.
    Well no, but what I was getting at is if you just leave the net in one place and wait for the angler to bring the fish to to you then count on the fish swimming towards your net, then you "may" be waiting for awhile. It's only a thought as I've never done it this way. But apparently it works for him so that's all that matters. I just like that I can maneuver towards the fish as it presents itself.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  11. #11
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,852

    Default

    My way still leaves some room for the netter to maneuver. Didn't mean to sound like it's all up to the angler, but typically it's a sort of team-effort as mentioned. What I ideally go for is the angler to move the fish to the net more than the other way around. If you make too much or too fast of movements with the net, you spook the fish which results in more losses. I never scoop for a fish that is pointed nose-out of the net...if they've made the turn I let them circle back and try again unless the fish is dead tired. Then I slowly raise the net vertically around the fish, closing off all escape routes at once.

    I like a fish brought into the net with some momentum, head-first, and you close it on them when the tail clears the hoop and their whole body is in the bag.

  12. #12
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,835

    Default

    Give me three to six swings and I can knock any fish off of any hook!

  13. #13
    Member chico99645's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Shooot mm Clint Shooot mmmm!!!!!! Who needs a net? Them Landry boys know how to quell a fighter quick and proper like!

    I use a big rubber clear net as those mesh one are mostly good to tangle up hooks and line and loose fish.

  14. #14

    Default

    Have to say this thread is spoiling a lot of on-water excitement as my group always has a few novices in it that run around slapping water and nearly dunking ourselves. We like to put on this great show for all the fisherman around to get a laugh at. Thanks for the good explanations guys planning on doing some solo netting in a few hours wish me luck!

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    Give me three to six swings and I can knock any fish off of any hook!
    I am pretty sureI have fished with yo before Bull.......LOL

  16. #16
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aberdeen WA
    Posts
    4,516
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

  17. #17
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    You said in the thread...."Fish don't jump out of the net or swim out of the net.... they are led up and out of the net by continued upward tension on the rod tip! See for yourself...."

    I have to disagree. I've seen fish down in the bag with no tension from fishing line whatsoever, that just decide they don't want to be there and swim out. Of course a lot of this was due to the netter not properly closing the net around the fish....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  18. #18
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    I haven't had a fish jump out of the net, but I did have a big lingcod roll itself out the other day. Rolled up in the bag before I could get it over the gunnel, then unrolled right out of the bag, hook hung in the net, fish went swimming, like he had practiced it a hundred times beofre.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    42

    Default Netting 101 :)

    Quote Originally Posted by extrema View Post
    Jab or scoop, the netter can't do anything until the angler gets the fish into position.
    First off, if you're putting yourself between the angler and the fish with a net, you're asking for a released hook to come flying at your face if it decides to let go.
    Second, when the fish sees you coming at it with a big net, it's going to run, and not upstream into the net, but downstream, a tired fish will let the current aid him in his escape.
    The best way is to net the fish is from behind, but like others have said, the angler and netter to be in sync. The angler needs to get the fish pointed upstream as the netter moves into position behind with the net in the water at about 45 degrees, when the angler sees the netter in position, all he has to do is ease up slightly, or even move the rod towards the netter to keep some tension on the line, and the current will assist you in getting the fish into the net, this way the net never touches the line, increasing the chances of the hook releasing. Once the fish hits the net, the netter just needs to rotate the hoop of the net and this will close the net, fish landed

  20. #20
    Member Zissou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    What about my dynamite?
    Posts
    74

    Default

    I think the most important thing is to scoop it HEAD FIRST. Hit that tail from behind and it's liable to make one desperate run for it and escape.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •