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Thread: Grayling and Almar jet boats?

  1. #1
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Default Grayling and Almar jet boats?

    Just trying to find out any information about these two companies. I have looked on the net but found very little.

    I understand Grayling's were made in Eagle River till the late 80's early 90's and then went out of business. They appear to be well made boats. What problems are they known for, anything a prospective buyer should look for?

    Almar's are known for their solid hulls and long lasting craftsmanship, but the ones I have looked at looked very rough on the inside. Maybe they just need some good interior decorating?

    How much more is one worth with a aluminum hardtop? Versus the standard walk through windshield?

    How much does it normally cost to have a custom aluminum top built with or without a Alaskan bulkhead or vinyl drop curtain?

  2. #2

    Default Grayling

    Extremely well made boats. I think they are called Perigrine Marine now in Anchorage.

  3. #3

    Default hard top costs

    I had a preliminary quote of $5-$5.5K for my boat 2 years ago. The top was roughly 7' long by not quite 8'. No Alaskan bulkhead, was going to re-use my current drop curtain. I know 2 others that had roughly the same quote. This was in Anchorage.

  4. #4
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Top notch

    Quote Originally Posted by talkeetnakid View Post
    Extremely well made boats. I think they are called Perigrine Marine now in Anchorage.
    Jeff Johnson started Grayling Marine. For various reasons he has reorganized a couple of times under new names. Last I saw him it was Perigrine Marine on Rampart Drive in Anch. (Behind Alaska Mining and Diving)
    He built my brothers 24' offshore and it was a fantastic boat.
    He built that huge landing craft in Homers harbor, "Perigrine". He does all kinds of aluminum work, whatever you want. He is fair and has very high morals. The day we put the 24' in the water, my brother was so excited he cussed. Jeff shut the boat down and we had a discussion of proper language use in public. LOL! (We were 1/2 mile off the ramp)
    Great guy and great boats. I have known him for over 25 years and you can trust this man. Just watch your language!
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

  5. #5

    Thumbs up Almar

    Very good boats. I donít have experience with a flat bottom Almar jet, however I do have lot of experience with the RAIV jet and Sounder model. The RAIV turned on rails and was very seaworthy and also worked well in rivers too. The Sounder was also a nice seaworthy boat (but I preferred the RAIV). If prior to buying my current boat, I had the opportunity to buy an Almar that was in good condition and reasonably priced I would be all over it.

    Maybe a rough interior is a good thing; it gives you more options for updating and sound dampening.

    Did you check out Almarís website?

    http://http://www.almarboats.com/2004/index.php

  6. #6
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    Default

    I had an Almar once. The hull's are solid as a rock. Exceptionly well made.
    Tennessee

  7. #7

    Default powerline

    I have Powerline that was built in 1992. I was told that when Grayling folded up, one of his welders a guy named Powers started his own shop named Powerline. He built boats with alot of the same shapes, sizes, and design featurs as Grayling. I was looking for a Grayling boat when I found my 21' Powerline now I wanna sell it.
    Daniel
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=11317

  8. #8
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    Default

    Graylings had a double bottom. That was useless weight to me. They repaired my Wooldridge a couple of times. Great welders.

    Almar made a solid and fast boat. They also made the Jetline brand if I remember correctly. Good boats.

  9. #9
    Member gutpile's Avatar
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    Default Almar Jetline

    When Mahay ran Devils Canyon, he did it in a 24ft Jetline.

    I had a 20ft Jetline with a 351...put 800 hours on it running the Su & Yentna. Strongest hull I've been around. Mine had the 1/4" bottom...don't know what grade of alum it was but it was a very stout bottom. Early on a hit several gravel bars...they never did more than polish the bottom. I sold the Jetline & bought an Alumaweld...bad move on my part. I should have repowered and went to the 212 pump. Just get the Jetline & strip the interior...you'll be glad you did. Junk the old windshield and do the glass/alum sides with a lightweight top.

  10. #10
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    Thumbs up Almar boats are tough!

    I have owned an 18' Almar Jetstream since 1986. 351xHamilton 3 stage pump.
    In the early (learning) years, I hit a couple of rocks in the Deshka "Rock Garden" that would have opened most other hulls like a can opener. This boat has a 3/16" bottom, and is one of the most ruggedly built boats I have seen, over the many years I have owned it. Considering its 18' with the 351---this boat was built for speed and handling ability. If you are looking for a strong boat---after 20 years with this JetStream--I would give a real hard look at Almar.

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