Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: Side Arms

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    currently in Virginia - moving to Anchorage
    Posts
    12

    Default Side Arms

    Hello,
    I'm planning on moving to Anchorage this fall and as most of you will be spending every moment of my free time either in the woods or on the water. I've had a number of people recommend carrying a side arm when afield. What are your recommendations, what caliber do you recommend and are there restrictions as far as when/where you can and can't carry one? Thanks

  2. #2
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,443

    Default

    A revolver--44cal. and up...if you don't mind the weight get a 454 casull, if you are concerned about weight, get an alaskan backpacker.....K

  3. #3
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    Ditto on caliber and load with hardcast loads like Federal Castcores. A S&W Mountain Gun would be an excellent choice.

    No restrictions other than stay away from Nazi Park Circus lands, schools, bars and DV shelters while armed and inform the nice policeman you're armed if stopped for any reason.

    You can carry openly or concealed with or without a CHL. Your choice.
    Now what ?

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    650

    Thumbs up

    for those who do not practice much, a lighter caliber may be better. better to hit than miss with a hand cannon.


    .357 6" barrel and 200 gr. +P loads.

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    4

    Default Alaska Handgun

    Checkout the Ruger Redhawk. They just started making a 4" barreled stainless revolver. I will post in a couple of weeks and tell you how it shoots in comparison to my 7.5 inch barreled Ruger Super Redhawk in .454. The Ruger has a little longer cylinder than a Smith and Wesson and will handle higher pressure loads if you are able to accurately shoot them. Smith makes a fine gun also and the following website will shed light on ballistics. Go to www.Garrettcartridges.com and read about the different hard cast bullett offerings for the .44 mag. Corbon also makes hardcast for many calibers. Regardless of your level of experience with handguns, seek out a concealed weapons class. Good Luck.
    Last edited by KPK; 04-15-2007 at 10:18. Reason: misspelled word

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    currently in Virginia - moving to Anchorage
    Posts
    12

    Default

    I love all the info, keep feeding me ---- thanks all

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Check www.gunbroker.com regularly. I found my Ruger Super Redhawk .454 Casull on there for $450. MSRP on Ruger.com is $899. There's one on Gunbroker right now that you can buy for $525. The Ruger holds six rounds, as opposed to Taurus' five. The best thing about the .454 Casull you can shoot .45 Long Colt if you don't feel like dealing with the recoil. You'll also find some good deals on Taurus revolvers on Gunbroker, but S&W tend to be a bit more expensive. Good luck.

    Barron

  8. #8

    Default Shooting .45 Colt in a .454

    I found that in my Ruger Super Redhawk .454, if you shoot .45 LC with lead bullets, it will lead up quickly, and after just a dozen or so rounds fired, the cylinder is hard to rotate due to the lead build-up at the throat. The cleaning is a bit tedious, too. However, if I shoot .45 LC jacketed bullets, it will digest them all day long without any affect.

    I shoot this handgun hundreds of times in a year, and most are .45 LC, due to the recoil. But, I also fire a few dozen full-power loads a year so I am totally comfortable and sure about where this will hit. It also lets me handle it with total confidence that I can draw, aim and fire this weapon from any position without a second thought. I also draw and fire it many, many times from the holsters I carry it in, so I can unsling it without hesitation because I know where the snap closures are and how to unsnap it and go. With whatever you choose, practice, practice and practice some more until handling it is second nature. This could be the difference between a mauling and walking away, as many have found out.

    Personally, I like the Ruger. My brother-in-law has a Freedom Arms .454 and 2 friends have the Taurus Raging Bull. The FA is one of the most precise and beautiful handguns available, but it is a single action and holds only 5 rounds. Love the single action, but not in this situation. The Taurus is a beast, very heavy and also only holds 5 rounds. My Ruger is easier to carry, even with it's 7 1/2 inch barrel, and holds 6 rounds. It is also tough as a tank. It is not really more noticeable (to me) to carry than my Ruger Redhawk .44 Magnum with it's 7 1/2 inch barrel.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    currently in Virginia - moving to Anchorage
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Great stuff guys. I went onto Ruger's website and checked out the new Redhawk 44 mag 4" barrel. Nice lookin gun, the hesitation I always seem to have when buying something is trying to make it have a dual purpose -- in this case being able to not only use it for protection/safety but for hunting as well. I'm thinking I need to focus more on protection/safety on this purchase and if I want to pistol hunt then make that a separate purchase. I have a 10yr old boy, I don't think i want to be fumbling around trying to pull something out of a holster with a 9+ inch barrel .

    Can you shoot any other rounds through a 44 as you can the 454? I will of course take your advice and practice practice practice to be confortable with all rounds I send through the gun. I'm not a big guy (170lbs) so if I can take a little bit of the kick out while I'm doing all that practice it would be nice.

    I went onto gunbroker.com and you were right about the pricing - it definitely pays to shop around. Last year I bought the new Nikon Omega Muzzleloading scope and did some shopping around, found a wholesale gun dealer online that gave it to me for about $205 total (new on the market and nobody would touch the price) --- more than $65 less than Cabelas and stores like them.

    Sell me more on the Rugers

    Eric

  10. #10

    Default .44 vs. a .454

    A .44 Magnum allows you to shoot .44 Special rounds in it. A .454 is not any larger, and has twice the muzzle energy as a .44 Magnum. The recoil really isn't much more than a stiff-loaded .44 Magnum. One "trick I learned a long time ago is to replace those factory grips on any handgun and put either Pachmyers or my preference, Hogues with finger grooves. With the factory stocks (grips) on my .454, it stung the dickens out of my hand every time I shot it, even tho it is advertised with "soft rubber inserts". I put the Hogues on it, and not only do I control the recoil and muzzle-flip better, it doesn't hurt. Still a good rearward smack, but very controllable.

    Yes, always shop around. One thing you will find in Alaska in some of the big stores is they sell their firearms at the "Manufacturers Suggested Retail Price". A ripoff, but a lot of folks don't even look at other stores.

    I would not advocate a 4" barrel on a hunting weapon, but that would be a personal choice. The 9 and 10 inch ones are really too long. The 6 to 8 inch barrels are the best "compromise".
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  11. #11
    Member bushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Now residing in Fairbanks from the bush
    Posts
    4,363

    Default .917 Super Magnum

    Been testing a new .917 Super Magnum with an 8" magaported barrel using hardcast 1400 grain (yes, FOURTEEN HUNDRED GRAINS!) bullets. I admit it's hard to even force myself to pull the hammer back after the first shot, what with my ears bleeding (even with hearing protection) and my broken wrist, but it absolutely blows up whatever I hit with it. Weight isn't bad either, only 6.5 pounds in a custom double-shoulder holster.
    Be safe out there,

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Hawken, what kind of holster do you prefer for your Ruger .454? I haven't bought one yet as I won't be moving to Alaska until early August. Do you prefer a hip holster, under-arm holster, or front-of-the-chest holster? Thanks.

    Barron

  13. #13

    Default Holster choices

    For normal carry, I prefer the under-arm style. When fishing in waders, I like the front of chest type. A large caliber gun like this is too unweildy on the belt.

    I am a large man, 6' 5" and a shade over 300 pounds, and some of my "stature -challenged" friends have trouble with the underarm style of holster, but can handle the front of chest type alright.

    Bushrat, if you can't handle the 917, maybe you should stick to .22's........
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  14. #14

    Default side arm

    I have a Taurus Ultra light Titanium 44 mag. It's got the power and its also easy to use.

  15. #15
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Beauty Bushrat... Them Voles are gettin harder and harder to stop in a charge.

    Bob

  16. #16

    Default

    Don't know if you have ever shot before but if you haven't don't buy a hand cannon (454 or similar). I'd get a 44 that fits you well and spend the extra money on profficiency classes. Better to have a smaller gun you can hit with than something you can't hit anything with. Pack bear spray until you are comfortable shooting the gun.

    That said. Short barrels are a little harder to hit with. The 5"-6" range point really well and aren't that uncomfortable to pack.

    I don't like the 454 (because I have a 480 ) because there are easier ways to get stopping power. Larger diameter, heavier, slower bullets, will make as much or more momentum as the smaller faster rounds and be much easier on the wrist. Kinetic energy is for people selling beer bottle magnums, my opinion and likely to set off a whole different arguement. If you're thinking about getting a 454, I'd take a look at the 480 as well. With botique hard cast bullets it is a very potent caliber and won't give you tendonitis.

  17. #17
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    650

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by BBrittingham View Post
    Do you prefer a hip holster, under-arm holster, or front-of-the-chest holster? Thanks.

    Barron
    the under arm holster allows the muzzle to sweep your guide, hunting partner, dog or anyone else in proximity to you. for safety reasons , it should be a no go.

    the front of the chest holster is slow to get the muzzle oriented toward the target and will also allow the muzzle to sweep anyone on the shooter's left side. another no go.

    the hip holster allows you to fire as soon as the pistol clears the holsters and the muzzle oriented toward the target. the muzzle is kept in a downward or safe position at all times. the pistol can be discharged by the point shooting method while the pistol is being driven out and the sights are being lined up. the "straight drop" hip holster offers several advantages over the other options. a hip holster with the "f.b.i cant" will lead to a draw stroke that leads to casting and is slower to get on target.

    m.h.o., be safe.

  18. #18

    Default .480 vs. .454 recoil

    A buddy of mine has a .480. We go to the range quite a bit and shoot both his .480 and my .454. To be honest, I can't tell a whole lot of difference in the recoil in hunting loads between them. The .480 is better than the .44 Magnum, offering an average of 50% more energy, but the .454 is over 50% better than the .480 in average energy at the muzzle, where these weapons need it if used for defense. I like the feel of his .480, and if I had shot it before I shot a Ruger .454, I would have probably bought one myself. I do like my .454, tho...... BUT, only after I changed grips, as I said in an earlier post. It hurt before that......

    Bottom line when you get to these caliber weapons; shoot each if possible, and learn how to shoot whatever you choose well. Enjoy yourself, and if you are a reloader, all sorts of avenues are awaiting you.
    Last edited by Hawken54; 04-16-2007 at 20:27. Reason: Fat fingers
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    520

    Default

    I've never shot the .480 but bought a Super Redhawk .454 a little while ago. I took it out shooting for the first time a couple weeks ago. I started out with .45 Colt with almost no recoil and after a couple dozen rounds of that loaded some Buffalo Bore 360 .454 rounds. I could feel it, but the recoil wasn't as bad as I'd anticipated and a reasonably quick second shot was no problem. I managed to get almost everything in the black, despite having a good layer of rust on my shooting skills. I did notice a slight ache in my palm a couple of days later....now I just need to get my recoil tolerance up for when I get my new .917 Richards......Louis

  20. #20
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    44 mag or I find some one slower then me
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •