Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Relocating from Georgia to Anchorage- am I doomed?

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Athens, Georgia
    Posts
    2

    Default Relocating from Georgia to Anchorage- am I doomed?

    Hi all,

    I am planning a move to Anchorage in the next two months or so, maybe October. I have no real cold weather experience and am unsure what I'm in for. I will also be flying there, and will have no car. I'm wondering if I should buy a car here and drive it to Anchorage, or should I buy a car there? I've been told that buying a car in AK would be more expensive. If I could potentially live within half a mile of my job, would I be able to walk, ride a bike, or bus to work? I'm sure I'll need a car eventually, but hoping I can get away with not having one for a month or two. Is October too cold to walk to work?

    I'm also curious about Native Alaskan culture. I'll be working as a nurse at ANMC (hopefully) and I'm not sure what cultural differences to expect from any Native patients. Hoping to increase my level of understanding (and also decrease the chances of offending anyone.) I'd like to know a little bit more about the history. Any reading material or insights?

    Thanks!

    Tyler

  2. #2
    Member SANDRAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Kenai,AK
    Posts
    123

    Default

    [QUOTE=temp235;1147690]Hi all,

    I am planning a move to Anchorage in the next two months or so, maybe October. I have no real cold weather experience and am unsure what I'm in for. I will also be flying there, and will have no car. I'm wondering if I should buy a car here and drive it to Anchorage, or should I buy a car there? I've been told that buying a car in AK would be more expensive. If I could potentially live within half a mile of my job, would I be able to walk, ride a bike, or bus to work? I'm sure I'll need a car eventually, but hoping I can get away with not having one for a month or two. Is October too cold to walk to work?

    I'm also curious about Native Alaskan culture. I'll be working as a nurse at ANMC (hopefully) and I'm not sure what cultural differences to expect from any Native patients. Hoping to increase my level of understanding (and also decrease the chances of offending anyone.) I'd like to know a little bit more about the history. Any reading material or insights?

    Thanks!

    Tyler[/QUOTE}
    This is stilll the United States,Holy Crap !!! Natives are pretty civilized here in Alaska,actually pretty nice people ! Anything you can do to make yourself at home would be appreciated !!!

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Athens, Georgia
    Posts
    2

    Default

    guess I have already offended. I would have no reason to think that they are not nice people or not civilized. That is not at all what I meant. I just know that there is a wealth of culture in AK that I have no idea about and am interested in getting to know the history.

  4. #4
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    ANMC will get you spun up on the native culture during orientation. One thing to note is that AK is huge and there are multiple different native cultures spread around the state not just one "Alaska native". Many (most?) now have grown up pretty much just like anywhere else in Anchorage, Fairbanks or the valley. Some have never been to "town". I met a few that had never been in an elevator while I worked there. They aren't ignorant and knew it wasn't some sort of magic or any BS like that but they certainly weren't completely comfortable with climbing into a closet and being hoisted 4 stories in the air either!

    One thing that amazes me and I have seen it several times is healthcare professionals failing to realize that just because someone doesn't speak English does not mean they are feeble minded. I swear to god I once heard a dentist say to a Colonel in the Italian army " I need you to open your mouth wide like a shark!" in her best Saturday morning cartoon mom voice.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,956

    Default

    Are you doomed? Why yes Actually the cold is probably not going to do you in. although it will be a challenge. What is going to get you is the darkness in the winter. 4 1/2 hours of "light" is about all you get in december in Anchorage. Walk to work? Dress for it and you can although the sidewalks are not always as cleaned off as you would wish which also makes biking in the winter difficult. There are plenty of buses so it depends on if you are on a route or not. At some point a car is needed because you will want to get out and enjoy other parts of Alaska.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Willow/Moose Creek
    Posts
    473

    Default

    Tyler, you'll do fine. Walking in October will be chilly but probably no snow yet. If you can walk or ride now, you can when you come up. Lots of people do.
    When I first came up, I worked there. It was a lot of fun. I only had a bike for a year while working. I rode, walked and took the bus.
    They have an orientation re: culture differences. It is a job like any other--be flexible.
    Good luck with the job. Have fun.

    Oh, I would buy a car up here. Gas driving up through Canada is spendy. The drive is very nice in a good car, with time and some money in your pocket.

  7. #7
    Member Rumbarr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Ft. Pierce Florida
    Posts
    179

    Default

    Hey Tyler, welcome to the forums. As far finding a place close to work shouldn't be to much of a issue, heres some rooms and apartments for rent in and around Anchorage http://anchorage.craigslist.org/roo/

    Good luck
    Alaska bound !

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Default Y'all come . . .

    Hello,Tyler,

    Y'all come . . heah?

    You'll do just fine . . an adventure. You may end up loving it up here, maybe not, time will tell. Never fear, if those dad-gum Yankees can take your heat, you can take our cold.


    No! There's the land. (Have you seen it?)
    It's the cussedest land that I know,
    From the big, dizzy mountains that screen it
    To the deep, deathlike valleys below.
    Some say God was tired when He made it;
    Some say it's a fine land to shun;
    Maybe; but there's some as would trade it
    For no land on earth -- and I'm one.

    You come to get rich (****ed good reason);
    You feel like an exile at first;
    You hate it like hell for a season,
    And then you are worse than the worst.
    It grips you like some kinds of sinning;
    It twists you from foe to a friend;
    It seems it's been since the beginning;
    It seems it will be to the end.

    I've stood in some mighty-mouthed hollow
    That's plumb-full of hush to the brim;
    I've watched the big, husky sun wallow
    In crimson and gold, and grow dim,
    Till the moon set the pearly peaks gleaming,
    And the stars tumbled out, neck and crop;
    And I've thought that I surely was dreaming,
    With the peace o' the world piled on top.

    The summer -- no sweeter was ever;
    The sunshiny woods all athrill;
    The grayling aleap in the river,
    The bighorn asleep on the hill.
    The strong life that never knows harness;
    The wilds where the caribou call;
    The freshness, the freedom, the farness
    --O God! how I'm stuck on it all.

    —Robert Service

    And when you've seen the Fall ice come,
    and you've seen the Spring ice go,
    You can drop the name "Cheechako,"
    and be called a "Sourdough."

  9. #9
    Member FishKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    260

    Default

    Moving here in Oct will be interesting. If you get a vehicle make sure it is 4 wheel or All wheel drive since you do not have any experience driving in the snow and ice. Studded tires are also recommended. You will need to get warm clothes and a good coat, jacket, hat, gloves, and boots. Make sure you stay busy in the winter or you will hate this place. Ask tons of questions and YES, WE ARE PART OF THE UNITED STATES. You will get use to it but it may take a few years. ...........

  10. #10
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,366

    Default

    Sorry, you are doomed
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

  11. #11
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    687

    Default

    Welcome Tyler...

    While it will be a shock to your system, my family moved from Savannah to Fairbanks in Dec 03. Got off the plane and it was a balmy 24 below. Yes I said balmy.

    Anchorage is a lot warmer in the winter months than Fairbanks is, so you can see that as a plus. I think it dipped down to -25ish here last year, so you will need to be prepared for that. Layers... wear layers.

    You asked about a bus line, yes there are quite a few buses that travel to ANMC. Finding an apartment next to the bus line may be difficult. There are quite a few apt complexes near the ANMC campus, so if holding off on buying a car is what you want to do I think with some effort you may find housing close enough to support that desire. Those bus lines also run to the local grocery stores and shopping centers.

    Like others have said, stay busy and get involved with others, probably co-workers at first. Whatever you do don't become trapped in your apartment after work and off days... you will get down about AK. If you can hang, there is someone here who will more than likely drag you with them if you ask... regardless of how crazy the adventure sounds .

    Get ready to exit your comfort zone in nearly every aspect. Weather, Driving, Geographic topology, people, wildlife etc...

    Again, welcome and and I wish you luck in your upcoming adventure!
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

  12. #12
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I honestly disagree with the 4x4 deal. Assuming a fairly young guy with no family and limited initial budget while getting established I would buy a front wheel drive beater with a heater and slap some studded tires on all 4 corners then just use the dang thing. Gas costs a fortune and there is absolutely no reason not to have a cheap vehicle to drive to and from work that gets decent mileage even if you can afford something nicer.

  13. #13
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    South Central
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    I'll go for doomed, too.

    Too cold to walk to work? This isn't Antarctica. Chicago has harsher winters than Anchorage. Where an the earth do you think we are?

  14. #14
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    If you are mentally prepared for cold and dark you won't be as apt to get depressed. Embrace the winter. Make friends with people who like to do things and get them to take you along.
    There are lots of southerners up here. Many have been here for decades. You will find Native peoples interesting and enjoyable to be around (most, just like any other peoples).
    And just remember: Alaska is within driving range of Anchorage!

  15. #15
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Life's what you make of it. Personally I think the benefits of living in AK far outweigh the downsides compared to the lower 48. As far as buying a car vs. driving up. Cars here might be more expensive, but you'll be burning quite a bit of fuel to drive up from Georgia, not to mention other travel expenses. I'd say flying up and buying a car here should be the less expensive route, unless you're just looking for the adventure of a transcontinental international road trip.

    The cold really isn't a big deal, and it's typically only bitterly cold for a few weeks out of the winter. Check out Sierratrading post and pick up some good cold weather clothing at discount prices. A few pairs of polypro long underware, a layer of fleece, a waterproof layer a light down jacket, couple pairs of gloves and hats and you'll be set for all seasons.

    As far as differences in native culture, that is hard to quantify as there are so many different native groups in Alaska with differences between their cultures, and also differences between native Alaskans that live in larger population areas and those that live in remote villages. On the other hand it's not different than dealing with patients in each and every hospital. You need to get to know the patients, some patients are helpful, some are difficult. If you truly care about your patients than whether or not they are native really isn't an issue.

    I'd say the best piece of advice to anyone moving up from the lower 48 is don't tell Alaskan's how you do it outside. Some things we do differently up here, and typically for good reason. I think you'll find to a degree things are slower paced up here. That can lead to frustration, so learn to be patient. If you go out to a restaraunt and find the service is slow, well, welcome to Alaska.

    As far as unique opportunities, the ANMC is situated on some excellent trails for summer time hiking or mountain biking, and x-country skiing or snowshoeing in the winter.

    Some photos I've taken within a 15 minute walk of the ANMC:







    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  16. #16
    Member Derby06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    437

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I honestly disagree with the 4x4 deal. Assuming a fairly young guy with no family and limited initial budget while getting established I would buy a front wheel drive beater with a heater and slap some studded tires on all 4 corners then just use the dang thing. Gas costs a fortune and there is absolutely no reason not to have a cheap vehicle to drive to and from work that gets decent mileage even if you can afford something nicer.
    /\ /\ /\ What he said /\ /\ /\

  17. #17

    Default

    go dogs:

    a) you will survive (with correct rain/foot wear);
    b) no sensitive conversation topics with natives on whatever issues you may perceive, real or not (poverty, public assistance, alcoholism, domestic violence, etc.); maybe learn some basic Native language(s) phrases;
    c) try to make it on public transportation at start, and go fishing/hunting with locals (as on this forum);

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •