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Thread: Tips on repair

  1. #1
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    Default Tips on repair

    Sometimes things just happen, like a broken net hoop, etc.. Might I suggest something that had never occurred to me until another musher friend of mine showed me, and that is using automobile hose clamps for holding things together. Hose clamps come in stainless steel and often they are used to patch up a broken sled in distance races such as the Iditarod, so you know they have got to be tough. These little gems can be kept in your glove box or gear box, along with a screwdriver or nut driver to tighten them with, and they easily gang together if you need something longer. if you break a net hoop, as I saw someone have happen yesterday, you can take something as simple as a branch of wood and use hose clamps to make a bridge between the two broken sections. I would opt to use two clamps on each end myself, and then wrap them with electrical, or duct tape, to keep your net from snagging in the edges, protrusions, or ends.

    Speaking of nets, I am so inept at tying knots, it is a miracle that I can even tie my shoes. When you have to do a net repair, any sort of knot will do quite nicely if you put a drop of Super Glue on it and it only takes a minute or two for it to set-up, no slip, no coming undone, and I have had these repairs last for several seasons. I carry a tube of Super Glue with my gear along with some repair line, and a safety pin for when the glue hardens in the tube and won't come out, and put all in an old prescription bottle.

  2. #2
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    Great tips.

    But of course don't forget the power of mighty duct tape, and also zip ties. Know that some zip ties are like 1000 times stronger than others, so shop around for those.

  3. #3
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Sewing a new net on is so easy a kid could do it with a minute or two of coaching.
    I always carrty a spare net and a mending needle loaded with the appropriate mending twine on it in the glovebox on the boat.
    Pick that stuff up at any commercial fishing supply place.
    Zip ties also work but your net hangs up on them. Being sewing on a net is so easy I just carry the needle and twine instead.
    Fixes holes in a jiffy as well. learn the right knots and you don't need the glue.
    Just put a new net on my friends boys dipnet and it may have taken me all of 5 minutes or so in his yard. A pocket knife and 1/2 a needle full of twine did the trick.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  4. #4
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    Agreed, sewing on a new net is easy, or even better if you have a hoop that you can open and just thread on a new net. I agree that for $25.00 or so, not to carry a spare net bag is sort of silly, but if you can repair what you have, so much the better. I have looked on the Internet and in booklets I have on knots and canít find what they use for nets that won't slip in any direction. I sure wish I knew someone that knew how to do this that could show me how easy it is, but I have never run across anyone, though I know they are out there, I just donít know any. So, the Super Glue and any old knot works for me.


    Some folks are just knot stoopid and I am one of them, but my mother loved me just the same.

  5. #5
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    I use a sheet bend, as below. It's not complicated, but every summer I look it up again to refresh my memory. For small repairs you can do it without a shuttle if nec.

    http://www.netknots.com/rope_knots/sheet-bend/

  6. #6

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    Last year I had two nets bust after landing only one fish! I brought a bunch of hose clamps, zip ties, duck tape and 2ft sections of an old dip net handle just in case. When the nets we were using broke I thought my wife and buddy were going to die! I pulled the "repair kit" outta my bag and had both nets up and running in 10min. We limited out that day in 5hrs, they were impressed haha. I had the repair kit with me again this year but didnt need to use it.

  7. #7
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Usually my experience has been that once your net starts to break it is weak enough that it is shot.
    I suppose if you snagged a sharp edge with a good net a repair may be in order.
    When fish are able to break my net I have always found that the net is shot and I can break it easily myself and isn't worth fixing.
    I learned to fix nets from some commercial fishing friends of mine. If you know a commercial net fisherman 10 minutes of lessons will help you immensly.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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