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Thread: Looking for land

  1. #1
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    Default Looking for land

    Hey everyone! I am looking for anywhere between 10 and 50 acres in Alaska. I'm not set on a certain place, so i'm looking all over the state. I have been looking through the land available on alaskarealestate.com and also the overthecounter alaska land. Would be be easier, as in a lot less hassle and paperwork to go through if I bought through real estate vs. the over the counter? I would be paying it in one lump sum. Any and all help and suggestions is greatly appreciated!

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    Member tabmarine's Avatar
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    Look up Alaska Remote Properties LLC. They have all types of options all over the state.

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    All it takes is MONEY.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    LandinAlaska.com is another good site. Larry House is a great agent to work with.
    BK

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    If you don't need to finance, I think either option would be fine. I think more depends on finding what you want for the price you are willing to pay than who you buy it from.

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 20, 2012

    Deadline looms for State’s public land sale offering

    (Anchorage, AK) – The State of Alaska reminds the public that the deadline to apply to purchase land in the Department of Natural Resources’ Initial Over-the-Counter offering is approaching. Residents and non-residents alike can choose from nearly 2,500 acres across 350 parcels. The parcels, as large as 40 acres, are valued between $3,000 and $33,000. Applications can be submitted until 5 p.m., August 1 and the apparent winners will be identified during a drawing held in the Department’s Anchorage Public Information Center the following week.

    Parcels are available in rural and remote locations in Southcentral and Northern Alaska. Amenities include oceanfront, lakefront, riverfront, roadside, and fly-in access, with parcel sizes ranging from 1 to 40 acres. The properties are priced at appraised values. There is no limit on the number of parcels an applicant may purchase in this offering.

    If part of your dream is to own a piece of Alaska’s “Last Frontier,” the State encourages you to review the properties described in the free brochures available at DNR Public Information Centers in Anchorage and Fairbanks, and the public counter for the DNR Land Section in Juneau. Additional information on DNR’s land sales, competitive in-house financing, and Veterans’ programs, including online brochures, can be found online by clicking on the “Buy Land” link at http://dnr.alaska.gov and the Land Sales website at http://dnr.alaska.gov/mlw/landsale/. Assistance is also available by calling 907-269-8400, (TDD for the hearing impaired at 907-269-8411), or sending an e-mail to dnr.pic@alaska.gov.

    For faster, more frequent updates, subscribe to the program's email list using the Land Sales website, like “Alaska State-Owned Land For Sale” on Facebook at http://facebook.com/AlaskaLand/ or follow the program on Twitter at http://twitter.com/AlaskaLand4Sale/.

    Check the Land Sales website <http://dnr.alaska.gov/mlw/landsale/> for current information.

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    Thanks for all the replies. Very informative info from everyone. I have been checking out the sites yall have suggested. So far I think my best option is to buy directly from a real estate company. Anymore information will be greatly appreciated! thank you!

  9. #9

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    just out of curiuosity what are you looking for on the road off the grid maybe someone might have something
    you would be interested in with a little more inforation

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Remember also that owning land up here is a bit different than south.Most all land here is open for use by anyone so even if you just own a acre of land you may have a million acres to play in touching your land.Yes if you want to farm or have a real big garden you need to own but for play its first come.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    How do you plan to access the property? Road, wheeler, plane, boat? Some places don't have access during breakup and freeze in. Some don't have adequate trees for firewood. Some is total marsh. Some never thaws. What do you have for income? What type of cold can you handle? Lots of snow, lots of cold or both?

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    I would prefer road, but if there is just a trail i can make a road. I would love lots of trees, the less marsh the better, im not used to tons of snow, but to be able to live in alaska, im willing to get used to it. It would also not just be me, its 4 others as well, including children.

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I take it that all the adults have needed skills or jobs lined up? Food is getting more expensive every day. I just sent a friend back to her home in AR. She was shocked at food prices. Diesel is $4.06. Breakfast almost anywhere is $10-12 bucks. She paid $10.25 for a pack of smokes. A dozer rents for at least $350 a day. Trucks are $100 an hour. More if remote.

    If you think that the PFD will last more than a month, think again. Some people have it spent before they even get it.

    Do you have family up here? Friends? Alaskans are great people, but sometimes you have to know someone to get a job. Same as down south.

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    .....................................

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    If you wish to "hillbilly it up" stay where you are. Alaska won't support you in a manner that AR will. It takes money, hard work, and a good job to make it here. Otherwise, it takes money. This isn't a freeloader state. It doesn't have long growing seasons to make it through a long cold winter.

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    Dirtofak, I do not appreciate you saying if I wish to" hillbilly it up", or that you think I might want to be a freeloader. Just because I'm from Arkansas does not mean I am a hillbilly or a freeloader. You do not know me so don't think that you can assume those things about me. I simply started this thread to get some questions answered, so theres no need in being rude.

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    Member Alaskanmutt's Avatar
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    Hickchick.
    I am sure Dirt didn't mean to be rude, but he does make a point.
    Do you and the other adults have work lined up? A good part of the land on the road system near almost any "city" has property taxes, some are more than others. I pay 1200.00 a year on land that has no improved access. You have to think about heat sources for the winter, you cannot just cut wood on state lands, there are certain areas where it is legally allowed. Heating fuel can be wicked expensive in areas, and you have to think about how to get it to the cabin. You have marsh everywhere in Alaska, you cannot avoid it, so building a road to a peice of property can be pricey. Plus just cause you own a chunk of land doesn't mean you can put a driveway into it. If you cross state lands you can place a trail 5 feet wide using hand tools only without permitting. Any thing over that needs a easement and overland permit from the State Department of Natural Resources. If you are in a borough they may require certain standards.

    Not trying to disuade you but these are things that need to be addressed.
    The growing season is very short, most veggies don't grow well without greenhouses (I have lived in Anchorage for 20 years and have never been able to get tomatos do grow worth a darn without a greenhouse) and then you have to think about what happens to the green house when it gets 5 feet of snow on it. any remote land driveway will have to be cleared of snow (you canmost likely park on the road and just take snow machines to the road from thecabin but then the "road hunters: may shoot your vehicle up or borrow your snowmachine while you are gone.

    As for your original question. It is easier to buy from the state. If you are paying a lump payment they can write a pay off contract which is all you need to do. If buying it on terms, no credit check, 5% down, and low monthly payments , no pay early fees. Takes 6 months to get the patent when paid off but that is just waiting for the paperwork. Once the contract is recorded the land is yours to build on. You do not need to wait for pay off. If buying from a private party make sure you get the original Quit Claim Deed and RECORD the **** thing. It is the only proof you own it. Do not trust the land owner to record it for you.

    There has been instances of people buying land, not getting the QCD, the original owner not recording it and reselling the land. then it is up to you to prove in court that you actually paid the land owner Remember the words DUE DILLIGANCE
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    Thank you, alaskanmutt. Very informative without being rude. As for the job situation, it's private, so I cannot discuss it. But needless to say, it is worked out already. As for heating, we plan on burning wood.I realize Alaska living is going to be hard work, but anything worth having is HARD WORK. My family is used to the hard work and we are always up for a challenge. As for the building the road situation, I guess we will just do what we have to do. lol. Thanks for all the info and I welcome anymore that you might have!

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Don't forget to look at the S.E. and smaller towns.We have some good mental health land for sale on Wrangell thats nice
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  20. #20
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hickchick76 View Post
    Dirtofak, I do not appreciate you saying if I wish to" hillbilly it up", or that you think I might want to be a freeloader. Just because I'm from Arkansas does not mean I am a hillbilly or a freeloader. You do not know me so don't think that you can assume those things about me. I simply started this thread to get some questions answered, so theres no need in being rude.
    Hence the "If you wish" pretext. I didn't assume anything. It doesn't matter where you are coming from. Alaska isn't an easy place if you don't do your homework. The grass may not be greener. I just want you to be informed. I do like to make people think. Friends wife works at the welfare office. She has lots of stories to tell. Families that make it to AK on their last dime and can't find a place to live. Can't afford to go back home. Churches low on funds helping them out. Food banks low. Crime is up.

    You say you have a job situation up here. Without knowing what kind of income you will have, I will just say that you can starve to death on $15 an hour. 5 people you might need $25 an hour. Grow a thicker skin. It gets cold up here.

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