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Thread: Canoe Purchase?

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    Member barber8605's Avatar
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    Default Canoe Purchase?

    I am looking to get a canoe. I will be mainly using it for duck hunting and some fishing. Is there any certain size or brand that does the best for these uses. Also I live in Wasilla is there a decent place locally to purchase one besides at Sportsmans? Thanks.

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    keep an eye on crigs list you can pick up some good buy's there , want new try Fred Myers , REI did carry them , every person
    has some ideas but what ever you get # 1 you have to move it by your back or trailer so go get one 15 to 17 ft an grow from there
    you get what you pay for [ unless a supper deal ]

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    With duck hunting, You want a canoe that doesn't teeter on a keel. So......find a canoe that doesn't have a keel for those moments you pull the canoe up on land to build your blind around. You want it to fit snug on the ground for the fast follow up shots at another duck. This ties directly into the other good attribute required of a good duck canoe: Initial stability if you have a dog, or have aspirations of getting a dog. Initial stability is associated with a flat bottom. My father was a big time wood duck hunter, and he gravitated towards smaller canoe dogs. He chose the springer spaniels due to their smaller size in relation to canoes. So......a relatively wide/flat bottom would be best. Getting up and down the slough to the lake will require motor power on the way back, so a wide canoe with a side mount would be best. You want a canoe that is fairly "earthy" colored. So greens and brown are best to build a blind around. No need in doing stupid camo jobs on canoes, let the blind material take care of that. A 17 ft. canoe works, but is a bit cumbersome for retrievals and pulling back into the water for to do so.

    Old Town Canoe makes the predator, but it has a keel which isn't a deal killer, but again it's nice to have a canoe that plants down flat onto the ground. Better yet, is the Mad River Angler. It's quite wide at 37", and is a nice size for maneuvering down the sloughs to the big lake, and motoring on the return with a little 2.5 hp suzuki kicker on a side mount. Here are my choices:

    http://www.madrivercanoe.com/product...ler/angler_14/
    http://www.oldtowncanoe.com/canoes/h...ator_c160.html

    Both canoes are earthy colored, both canoes would motor back up the sloughs with a 2.5 hp side mounted.

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    Member barber8605's Avatar
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    I like the looks of the old town predator. Any thoughts on the Saranac series from old town?

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    Ive got a wenonah spirit II 17' roylex olive drab that I like for both of the pursuits that you mentioned.. Also have an Oldtown discovery with a square stern that I put a johnson 6hp on, for upriver travel here in iowa. Width of canoes your considering should be 36" or better and little to no rocker. Mainer nailed the camo/color issue as well.

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    If you think you might portag the boat very far, pay attention to the weight. The two links above show boats that are different in many ways, including about 30 pounds. I'm on the north side of 50 and I'd say the sweetest word related to canoeing is "kevlar." It will also thin your wallet in a big hurry. And, with a narrow and thin-skin boat, you need to pay attention to rocks and jumpy dogs. Still, I can go way farther and faster than with our flat bottom ABS Old Town.

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    No jumpy dogs to worry about neither of my dogs are built for that type of work I will be a self retriever.

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    Well, to begin with, I am a huge, HUGE fan of the Old Town canoes, as evidenced by my screen name, but, I would suggest you take a look at a Gheenoe ( http://gheenoe.net/fifteenfour.html ) These are made in my home state. I've used them a lot in the same manner in which you want to use yours, and they are hard to beat-nigh impossible to beat.

    Their big claim to fame is stability on the water. If you look on that link at the photos about 3/4 of the way down, there's a photo of guys firing shotguns standing up in them. I've seen guys do this. I've stood on the gunwales of mine and rocked it around without flipping. It's all in the hull design. The hull is flat on the bottom, but it has built in sponsons on which the canoe will rest for it's "secondary" stability. Additionally, the sides curve back inward as they rise to the gunwales, which means that, if you're standing on top of them, or leaning over the side to net a fish, you're not really putting your body weight out past the side of the canoe by very much, so the boat stays stable.

    These are very shallow draft boats as well. They're very popular with the saltwater flats fishing guys back home in the gulf because they can be poled through only a few inches of water back in the mangroves. I'm sure that that feature will transfer nicely up here; from what I've read here, a lot of the better duck country is some pretty nasty water.

    The other thing that, in my opinion, these have over the Old Towns and etc, is that they're fiberglass, not Roylaex. DOn't get me wrong, Roylaex is a great material, but it doesn't patch or repair worth a darn. (Difficult to do and always comes out ugly.) Fiberglass is easy to work with, can easily be repaired in the field to get you home, and can be refinished to new if you know what you're doing.

    The two biggest draw backs to owning a Gheenoe in Alaska, and this is why I dis-recommended the to another user here, is their weight and poor carrying capacity in relation to that weight. Because they're fiberglass, they're heavy-to the point that a trailer is the best and only logical transporting solution for a lone user. They typically only carry about 600-700 pounds, so, for moose hunting, I suspect that would be a disadvantage compared to a metal Grumman.

    But other than the weight issue, Gheenoes are killer awesome. If you're not planning to use it for an extended big game float hunt, they're the tool have.

    (Oh yeah, and you can get them from the factory in fall camo.)

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    I grew up in Florida and I am very aware of the Gheenoe but the weight is big on me I will probably be by myself launching and carrying it so they are out of the question. They are a great boat but not what I am looking for. If I was still in Florida I would probably have one for fishing the flats and backwaters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by barber8605 View Post
    I grew up in Florida and I am very aware of the Gheenoe but the weight is big on me I will probably be by myself launching and carrying it so they are out of the question. They are a great boat but not what I am looking for. If I was still in Florida I would probably have one for fishing the flats and backwaters.
    Oh by yourself huh??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt83 View Post
    Oh by yourself huh??
    Well Im eventually going to move and you wont be there helping me drag it to the water so I want something light.

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    Quote Originally Posted by barber8605 View Post
    I grew up in Florida and I am very aware of the Gheenoe but the weight is big on me I will probably be by myself launching and carrying it so they are out of the question. They are a great boat but not what I am looking for. If I was still in Florida I would probably have one for fishing the flats and backwaters.
    Yeah, that's always been a drawback on them. I don't even have one now, opting instead for an Old Town Guide (72 lbs). I can't imagine what it would be like, even for two people to portage a Gheenoe at Nancy Lake Canoe Trail.

    Eventually, I want a square stern of some sort, but even I don't know that I would bring a Ghenoe up here...maybe. I'm flying back down next summer to buy a new truck and tow my dad's bass boat up, so that's my one and only chance at one.

    I saw a Mad River boat at Tangle Lake last weekend that looked pretty slick. I helped the owner load it on top of his truck; it wasn't too bad. He said it gave a dry ride, and he portaged it by making multiple trips for the boat, engine, fuel tank, fishing gear, etc.

    PS: I sent you an unrelated PM

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    I know that the Mad River Explorer in kevlar is not what Mainer would recommend for this application, but it did well for me in Idaho. I just had to be a little careful when I grounded in the reeds/mud to actually hunt and stabilized it well before the chocolate lab was allowed to launch. An extra paddle that is bungeed at an an angle toward the mud with bulky extra jacket on the thwart can definitely make it more stable. Obviously when able- the dog was on the ground and I never had him launch out while in deeper water.

    I have an Esquif cargo that I recently got that has the ugly camo (came that way) that I think would do well for ducks too.

    I truly think (no disrespect toward other poster's) that the set up itself is much more important than the craft. Set up carefully and enjoy the hunt!

    BEE

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