Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Question for GoLite Shangri-La Owners

  1. #1
    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Kodiak, Ak
    Posts
    695

    Default Question for GoLite Shangri-La Owners

    I just received my Shangri-La SL3 in the mail today and had it outside for a few minutes messing with it. I saw a video on youtube in which a guy used the center pole and a center stake to measure out the spacing of all the stakes first and put them in the ground, then laid the fly down and connected the straps to the stakes. Does anyone else use this technique or do you just lay the fly down and stake each strap until its taut? I guess im just wondering if either way is better and why? Thanks

  2. #2

    Default

    I can't speak to the method you described because I haven't tried it, but it sounds a little bit unnecessarily complicated. For either the SL3 or SL5, we typically just stake out the main points first (six for the SL3 and 4 for the SL5), then erect the pole (we use trekking poles) and then stake out the rest of the points,adjusting as needed. We did add additional lines and tensioners to the optional guy out points mid way up the tent, which help with wind stability and also open up the interior headspace a little more.

    Hope this helps! I think you will be pleased with your shelter, it's a lot of space for little weight and my favorite of our tents these days. Are you using the golite or another nest inside, using a bivy or going totally floorless?

  3. #3
    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Kodiak, Ak
    Posts
    695

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Becca View Post
    I can't speak to the method you described because I haven't tried it, but it sounds a little bit unnecessarily complicated. For either the SL3 or SL5, we typically just stake out the main points first (six for the SL3 and 4 for the SL5), then erect the pole (we use trekking poles) and then stake out the rest of the points,adjusting as needed. We did add additional lines and tensioners to the optional guy out points mid way up the tent, which help with wind stability and also open up the interior headspace a little more.

    Hope this helps! I think you will be pleased with your shelter, it's a lot of space for little weight and my favorite of our tents these days. Are you using the golite or another nest inside, using a bivy or going totally floorless?
    Yeah, I tried out out both ways and seem to get the same results so it seems like measuring out the stakes first is unnecessary. I had setup my old lightweight tent the other day which is a whopping 28sq feet so I figured I'd see what else was out there to try out. I came across an old post of your husbands and decided to go with that setup- the shangri-la with the pyra-net on the inside. Seems like you guys have tested it out really good and your word goes a long way around here. So anyway, will be heading up the mountain Aug 1 chasing deer so I'll have a few nights coming up to check everything out. Thanks for the help

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CGSwimmer25 View Post
    Yeah, I tried out out both ways and seem to get the same results so it seems like measuring out the stakes first is unnecessary. I had setup my old lightweight tent the other day which is a whopping 28sq feet so I figured I'd see what else was out there to try out. I came across an old post of your husbands and decided to go with that setup- the shangri-la with the pyra-net on the inside. Seems like you guys have tested it out really good and your word goes a long way around here. So anyway, will be heading up the mountain Aug 1 chasing deer so I'll have a few nights coming up to check everything out. Thanks for the help
    Good deal, best of luck and let us know how the trip goes and how you like the tipi!

  5. #5

    Default

    I have both a SL3 and SL5, and the method I use to put up the tent ends with a taut pitch, but it often requires a second person for the first minute, and would be hard to do in bad weather:

    Put up the pole inside the loose, un-staked fly to 70% of its height (a few clicks below the top), and then have a partner hold the pole up while you go around and stake down the corners, starting at the door and moving around in a circle. When you're all staked down, raise the pole to the top and you should have a tight pitch.

    If you're using the bug nests sized for the tent, go around between the nest and the fly and connect all the loop connectors to the fly (I twist them and double up the loops so they won't come undone), and then stake out the fly separately (at least near the door), as it is made to create a small vestibule area near the door and so is slightly smaller than the fly. After doing this once you can usually keep the fly and nest together when you take it down and repitch, if you've connected the loop things well enough.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kodiak, AK
    Posts
    640

    Default

    I just keep my SL nest all connected up. stake that down, put up pole, tighten then stake out the fly. There is no way I would hit the Kodiak hills this year without the nest; skeeters and noseeums are worse than ever.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •