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Thread: Pros/cons of switching to compound?

  1. #1

    Default Pros/cons of switching to compound?

    I started shooting and hunting with a recurve 30 years ago and hung it up for a number of reasons 18 years ago. Pulled it out again yesterday, shot 40 arrows and it kicked my butt. I feel like someone beat me with a ball bat today. I'm sure I can get in shape again, but I'm wondering if a compound would be kinder to old joints and not have such a steep curve to get my bow muscles in hunting shape. I've shot a few compounds, but not for any sustained amount of time and not in a hunting situation. Anyone made the switch from recurve to compound and have some advice to offer?

  2. #2
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    i shoot both , much prefer the recurve.....lighter physical wt and alot more fun to shoot and less things to go wrong that need to be tinkered with. i hate to have to tinker with the bows. you tend to use different muscles with recurve and compound.
    if you are going to shoot regularly stick with the recurve......besure you are not trying to shoot too much wt.
    if not shooting regularly the compounds are very nice and smooth. again don't be "over bowed" 60 lbs will kill anything in North America. my recurves are 56# + #57 and compound is @ #60.
    newer recurves are also alot smoother than bows 30 years ago. some of the older ones used to stack esp if you draw more than 28".
    if you switch to compound and plan on shooting fingers do not get too short ( axle to axle) of a bow. probably want at least 37" min. longer the better. i would also look at single cam style. shoot some different makes find the one that feels the best for you.
    -Pat
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
    MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

  3. #3
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    Default traditional vs. modern

    Here is my question to you. How much are you willing to practice? If you are going to shoot traditional equipment, you'll have to practice alot. If not, go with the modern equipment. I have both and ejoy shooting the recurve but when it's time to hunt I grab the compound. With the recurve, I found, I had to practice all the time. The compound once sighted in, you can lay it down, come back to it in a month or two, and still hit the same spot. Now, there are people out there that are naturally good shooters, no matter what.
    I'm just not one of them and all the trad bow shooters I know have to practice alot. That's my only my opinion.

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    Default Cons

    I shot a compound for a while. I shoot a longbow/recurve now. The cons to a compound are the amount of gadgets to be sighted in and tinkered with. There's more equipment to get out of sync on a hunt. It's obviously heavier. My bow breaksdown so the hiking/packing job is easier. Shooting a simple bow is fun so the practice isn't work at all.
    Last edited by juneaubow; 04-15-2007 at 15:36. Reason: spell

  5. #5

    Default Complicated machines, not bows

    I did some shopping around and to be honest, the compounds aren't what I think of when I think of a bow. No offense intended to anyone who shoots them, but these are complicated machines and all the tuning and gadgets and high-tech mechanics is contrary to what attracted me to archery in the first place. I just don't think I would enjoy shooting as much with one of these things.

    I've decided that rather than switching to a compound, I'm going to just get a lighter draw weight recurve to get back in shape with and work my way back up to my old hunting bow. It's brought down 9 white tail, 2 elk, and 7 turkeys then had 18 years to rest, so it should be ready for caribou and/or moose in the next couple years.

    Thanks to all who chipped in with advice.

  6. #6
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Look At Black Widow Take Downs And Hoyt New T/d Is Very Nice.
    I Would Strongly Suggest A Take Down..... Heavier But So Handy To Travel With.
    If You Take The Time I Would Think You Could Be Ready By This Fall.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
    MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

  7. #7

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    I actually went from compound to recurve and have never looked back. Got a good deal on a Mathews bow a few years back but it just sits in it's case in the garage, maybe not such a good deal. I kind of like the added weight of a take down, it just feels more comfortable to me. Good shooting and stay safe...

  8. #8
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Compound

    I started with traditional but switched to a compound years ago. I maintain the use of the compound because of the diversity of the game I hunt up here. Goats, sheep, bears, caribou. Yes I know that a recurve will cleanly harvest all of the afore mentioned. But when it comes to a recurve I am just a terrible shot with it and won't try to harvest an animal that I might wound.

    I do love the lightness ans simplicity of the traditional bows and the reduced maintainence but the compound will remain the go-to bow for anything but birds and vermin.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

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    Excellent ethics DaveintheBush, words of a responsible hunter...

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    Member NDTerminator's Avatar
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    I went the other way. Grew up shooting recurves before bows had wheels, switched to compounds in the early 80's, and went back to Traditional last year. I arrowed a 138 & change 4 point whitetail, and with the high tech bow, sights, rest, and release it was simply too easy. Switched to recurve and 5 weeks later arrow'ed a doe which was a ton more satisfying than that big buck was. Have had some custom recurves made and haven't looked back.

    Bowhunting is supposed to be a challenge and a big part of the reward is working to master archery. With today's tackle, literally anyone with average vision and motor skills and about $700 bucks in his pocket (or less) can buy a setup bow in the morning and be plenty good enough to hit a deer's kill zone at 20 yards by evening of the same day...

  11. #11
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    I have been switching back and forth between trad gear and compound for many years and somehow find time to master both diciplines. Each early spring, I make a choice of which one I'm hunting with that year and then really work with one bow and equipment choice. I'm lucky enough to be able to shoot all year, even if it is just in the garage just for form. This year it's trad because of the hunts I have planned and the simplicity of this equipment will offer an advantage. One thing for sure, only you can make the choice and each individuals choice is, and should be, driven by the desire to bowhunt effectively. Bowhunting remains a challenge regardless of YOUR choice of equipment.

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    BTW, the above post is in no way a condemnation of compound bow shooters. Simply my point of view and choice. Hunt & live the way that fit's your pistol...

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