Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: For those with McHale Packs...

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    614

    Default For those with McHale Packs...

    For those with McHale packs (I know there aren't a lot on this forum), do you have the bypass shoulder harness system, and if so, do you like it? I got it on my pack, and I can't say I care for it too much, or whether it is even needed. Maybe I'm not using it to its full potential. I have an S-Sarc. Also, did you guys get thicker shoulder pads on yours or his standard ones? I got his standard ones and am thinking of sending it back to get new ones with more padding. Thanks for any feedback.

  2. #2
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,443

    Default

    Get a Barneys and be done with it....

  3. #3
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I have an INEX with the bypass harness and feel strongly that it is one of the innovations that set the packs into a league of their own. This is from a guy who tried the Barney's and never could get it right. I sold the Barney's and had Dan build my my dream rig.

    "Load lifters" on most packs are a joke. Basically their purpose is to stabilize the upper portion of the pack and take some weight off your shoulders. They end up playing tug of war with your shoulder strap and you can't really shift that much weight off your shoulders with them without compromising stability and there certainly isn't much ability to fine tune the load.

    The Bypass system allows you to adjust the tension on the top of the pack to control it and has zero bearing in the weight shifted on or off your shoulders. When setting your pack up to haul a load first hoist the pack up and set up the waist belt. Next don't be afraid to reach up and grab the frame stays and flex them as you bend over forward to get the load sitting right against your back. Next tighten the bypass straps, give the pack a shake and verify it is not shaking around on you continue to adjust the tension on the bypass straps till it is nice and solid. Now you can adjust the shoulder straps to take any amount of the load off your hips you want. You can literally move from 0% to 100% of the load to your shoulders with zero compromise in load stability.

    The biggest challenge with the bypass harness is to remember to loosen it when taking the pack off. The shoulder strap and load lifters on a McHale pack are two independent but complimentary systems that need to be set up each time you dawn the pack. For light loads it is probably overly complex but when weight climbs north of 60-70 and on up into the triple digits the configuration works better than anything I have seen.

    I didn't go with thicker pads and would bet that your thoughts on that are based on not setting up the bypass harness properly. I DID have to go with a wider width between the upper shoulder strap mounts so the pads didn't rub my neck and the bypass harness would track down the center of the pads. Working with Dan was great for me and I had no problem taking lots of pictures while wearing the pack to demonstrate things I felt weren't working right.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I have an INEX with the bypass harness and feel strongly that it is one of the innovations that set the packs into a league of their own. This is from a guy who tried the Barney's and never could get it right. I sold the Barney's and had Dan build my my dream rig.

    "Load lifters" on most packs are a joke. Basically their purpose is to stabilize the upper portion of the pack and take some weight off your shoulders. They end up playing tug of war with your shoulder strap and you can't really shift that much weight off your shoulders with them without compromising stability and there certainly isn't much ability to fine tune the load.

    The Bypass system allows you to adjust the tension on the top of the pack to control it and has zero bearing in the weight shifted on or off your shoulders. When setting your pack up to haul a load first hoist the pack up and set up the waist belt. Next don't be afraid to reach up and grab the frame stays and flex them as you bend over forward to get the load sitting right against your back. Next tighten the bypass straps, give the pack a shake and verify it is not shaking around on you continue to adjust the tension on the bypass straps till it is nice and solid. Now you can adjust the shoulder straps to take any amount of the load off your hips you want. You can literally move from 0% to 100% of the load to your shoulders with zero compromise in load stability.

    The biggest challenge with the bypass harness is to remember to loosen it when taking the pack off. The shoulder strap and load lifters on a McHale pack are two independent but complimentary systems that need to be set up each time you dawn the pack. For light loads it is probably overly complex but when weight climbs north of 60-70 and on up into the triple digits the configuration works better than anything I have seen.

    I didn't go with thicker pads and would bet that your thoughts on that are based on not setting up the bypass harness properly. I DID have to go with a wider width between the upper shoulder strap mounts so the pads didn't rub my neck and the bypass harness would track down the center of the pads. Working with Dan was great for me and I had no problem taking lots of pictures while wearing the pack to demonstrate things I felt weren't working right.
    Wow, sounds like I need a 4 year degree in packology to run one of them fancy pants packs. I'll stick to should straps, waistbelt, and sternum straps, beyond that I don't think I'd know what to do with it.

  5. #5
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    Wow, sounds like I need a 4 year degree in packology to run one of them fancy pants packs. I'll stick to should straps, waistbelt, and sternum straps, beyond that I don't think I'd know what to do with it.
    It is super easy, just long winded because it is different than every other pack on the market because you adjust the load lifters BEFORE the shoulder straps. Dan owns the patent to the bypass system so it is unique to McHale packs. Besides I thought you HAD a degree in Packology?? It's not my fault you insist on using a flawed design, just because it's popular doesn't make it right

  6. #6
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default

    Did you get your McHale with the antigraviational boosters too. When decending you adjust the load suspension so that the weight is diverted the boosters alowing you to gain balance when attempting cartwheels. Of course you'll have to have a ram in the pack first, hence the cartwheels.

  7. #7
    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    803

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I It's not my fault you insist on using a flawed design, just because it's popular doesn't make it right
    Ok... I've going to make a case here. This is a picture of LuJon's McHale:



    Note how it's kinda floppy, and empty looking?

    THESE on the other hand, are pictures of Alaska_Lanche's pack:





    Note the bony things sticking out the top? From where I'm standing, his pack doesn't look flawed to me.



    Yk

    Apologies to the OP for sidetracking his thread.

  8. #8
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Joke as much as you want the pack isn't for everyone...actually it is just for me, built to my precise measurements and exact specifications by hand in the USA using more robust equipment and larger stitching than can be found on assembly lines. The fabric is also the best of the best for strength and light weight.

    There is lots of really good furniture out there some is really high end manufactured stuff and costs a premium and will last for quite a while. For most that is enough. Some folks want the hand crafted Amish solid wood furniture that will last a lifetime (or 2) and is designed to their exact specs even if it does cost more.

  9. #9
    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    803

    Default

    I know all that, and don't have any issues with your pack choice, especially for a guy of your size. I was really just bustin' you over the comment to Luke about other pack being "flawed designs". You were joking I'm sure, but I couldn't resist the opening you gave me.

    Standard load lifters actually work pretty well for most of us. But what do I know? I'm still using stone age frame packs.

    Yk

  10. #10
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I consider Alaska_Lanche a good friend but he is blessed (?) with a flexible job and no kids(yet). He has 60+ days off for hunting season. I have about 15 if I am lucky. 9 days for a real hunt including travel to/from the field and the rest will be weekends around football for the kids. My 10yo is growing fast and my 8yo is hot on his heels with the 5yo bringing up the rear. I have spent nearly 4 years in Iraq between my active duty time and contract civilian employment since 2005 with 2.5 years of that coming since 2009 and was stationed In Texas and Florida from 1999-2007 so not exactly a ton of time to find and kill animals. I ship back out in a couple months so have to balance getting the house and family ready for my absence with hunting season. The family is the priority of course.

    As to packing weight one doesn't need to be the great white hunter to decide if a pack works.

    I look forward to seeing Alaska_Lanche's "days in the field" count when he has kids in soccer, dance, football etc. I Should be about in the Stid stage of life at that point if all goes to plan!

  11. #11
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    Did you get your McHale with the antigraviational boosters too. When decending you adjust the load suspension so that the weight is diverted the boosters alowing you to gain balance when attempting cartwheels. Of course you'll have to have a ram in the pack first, hence the cartwheels.
    I believe you are about the same size as me. We would have to try it out for fit but if it does I would encourage you to strap my pack on and load it up heavy to see what you think.

  12. #12
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default

    Repeat after me.....Barney's, Barney's, Barney's.
    If I must try your pack it will cost you a cold one.
    Grin!

  13. #13
    Member BIGAKSTUFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    449

    Default

    I look forward to seeing Alaska_Lanche's "days in the field" count when he has kids in soccer, dance, football etc. I Should be about in the Stid stage of life at that point if all goes to plan!

    SHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!! You're gonna scare him, we've been trying to get him to settle down and create some rugrats for a while now! Maybe I'll see him long enough to have a beer every once in a while when it finally happens
    The Second Amendment.......Know it, love it, support it.

  14. #14
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default

    Bring on the "Gin Yummy"!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •