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Thread: New to canning fish!

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    Default New to canning fish!

    I am finally going to can fish this year after being down in Kenai and want to know if anyone has any tips or recipes! I've heard to add a few jalapeno rings in the bottom but how many? also to add a pinch of sugar/salt. I also heard soemthing about letting it sit in the pressure cooker or all the juices will boil out of the jars. How long should it sit in there until i can take them out to avoid this from happening. Any other seasonings or onions or anything else i should put in there? bones/skins left on?
    Any tips or recipes I would very much appreciate!
    thank you!

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    A couple jalapeno rings don't really do much. We add a whole jalapeno cut in 1/2 with the seeds and/or a couple cloves of garlic.
    Also try adding 1 tsp of olive oil and/or srirachi red chili paste....gives it a little bit of flavor but not hot.
    I'd remove the skin and don't worry to much about small bones, they cook away to nothing.
    Almost any seasoning you like will work, cajun shake, brown sugar, etc....
    Remove the jars when you can safely handle them after cooking and apply the lids after they cool.
    Once cool, make sure they are sealed as the lid will be concave and will NOT flex when you push on it. That's all there is to it.
    Try smoking some and then can 'em.....it rocks.
    BK

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    I see no reason to remove the skin.

    Agree with most all BKs suggestions.

    Google "alaska cooperative extension salmon canning" for a handout with the full rundown.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Yep, the UAF cooperative extension also has a great online tutorial on canning. That's how I got started three years ago, and we've really enjoyed the product. As a general rule we put in 1 tsp of seasoned salt and usually 1 whole jalapeno chopped into slices. Like bkmail noted above, a few slices won't cut it for any added flavor....and that's really what it adds - flavor, not heat in any major way.

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    I'm not new to canning.... but never heard of the japapenos! That sounds great!

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    The Cooperative extension in Palmer is having a class on canning,call for details. This will be a hands on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Yep, the UAF cooperative extension also has a great online tutorial on canning. That's how I got started three years ago, and we've really enjoyed the product.
    Thats a great site!

    http://www.uaf.edu/files/ces/preservingalaskasbounty/
    I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

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    can I tack a question on here?
    I have some smoked salmon that was well canned (jars) in 2000
    kept in a cool garage since and the seals are good
    is this salmon still "ok"?
    It was awesome salmon back in the day
    just got forgotten about

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    12 year old salmon...... It might be okay, but I don't think I would eat it.

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    I fillet the main backbone out of my fish and I choose to fillet the skin off which is just my preference. Canned salmon in the stores does have skin on. It is just more fat as far as I'm concerned. I use one teaspoon of salt in each pint of salmon which is just right for my taste. I ran out of non iodized salt last year and did one canner of 16 pints without any salt which I didn't care for. I put one jalapeno pepper cut in half and seeded in each jar on one batch this year and it lent flavor to the product but it wasn't hot at all. Jalapenos do vary in hottness so maybe that was the deal. I only ate one jar of the jalapeno salmon so far.

    Fill your pint jars by packing the fish in with your fingers leaving about 1/2 to 1 inch of headspace. Make sure you wipe the top of the jar with a damp rag so that there is no fish matter on the rim or it probably wont seal and it will go bad.

    I can my salmon for 90 minutes at 15 pounds of pressure. I don't start timing until the gauge reaches the 15 pounds. At 90 minutes I turn off the stove and let the pressure drop to zero which you will know when the little pop up tap on the top of the canner lid settles down rather than to be popped up. Open the canner and take the jars out and let them set. You will know when they seal as the little bubble in the lid no longer bulges upward in a small convex manner you will also hear them ping a little satisfying sound as they seal. If they don't seal in a half hour or so they probably wont seal and those will need to be refrigerated and eaten soon.

    One other variable to the recipe is to add jalapenos and also a scoop of salsa in the jar to give it a unique taste. I like the flavor of the salsa salmon but it lends itself more to eating like that rather than incorporating it into a recipe.

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    How the heck could you forget about canned smoked salmon I love it? I would not be afraid to eat the fish but you should pay attention as you open it. If it hisses as the seal breaks it should be fine. The only thing that would ruin it would be if the jar lost it's seal and you would be able to tell that.

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    I usually stick with a half jalapeno, a teaspoon of peppercorns, and a course chopped garlic clove or two. My absolute favorite way to can salmon is to smoke it for and hour or two and then can it. I could eat smoked-canned salmon every day
    I always fillet the skin off of mine.
    When my parents left the state last year, we were cleaning out their garage and found some 8 year old canned salmon. It was absolutely delicious. Like the poster above mentioned, the most important thing is to make sure the jar still has suction. If you can press the lid up and down, toss it out!
    Not sure if you're new to canning salmon or new to canning period, but another tip is dont tighten the ring on the lid. I only tighten mine with my fingertips just to where I can barely start to feel the ring press down on the lid.

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    I sprung for a new canner
    This one only holds 8 pint jars but it has a screw down lid and I just feel better about using it
    It's an ALL American 915. It's just my wife and I and I just didn't feel the need to do 16 pints at a time.
    Only thing is reading the manual that comes with it it says USDA recommends NOT using this smaller canner to can (jar) SMOKED fish
    I am wondering why that would be. It says it cools down too fast, but why would that be an issue for SMOKED fish but not fresh fish?
    Also I'm wondering how much smoke would cause whatever issue? I don't tend to smoke fish that long that I am canning.
    I'm really careful when I can so I don't want to cut ANY corners but this just seems wierd.
    I wonder if this could be an issue for really DRY smoked salmon that has almost zero liquid in the jar????

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    Quote Originally Posted by gottago View Post
    I sprung for a new canner
    This one only holds 8 pint jars but it has a screw down lid and I just feel better about using it
    It's an ALL American 915. It's just my wife and I and I just didn't feel the need to do 16 pints at a time.
    Only thing is reading the manual that comes with it it says USDA recommends NOT using this smaller canner to can (jar) SMOKED fish
    I am wondering why that would be. It says it cools down too fast, but why would that be an issue for SMOKED fish but not fresh fish?
    Also I'm wondering how much smoke would cause whatever issue? I don't tend to smoke fish that long that I am canning.
    I'm really careful when I can so I don't want to cut ANY corners but this just seems wierd.
    I wonder if this could be an issue for really DRY smoked salmon that has almost zero liquid in the jar????
    Not trying to hijack the thread, but build on what is evolving. I have never canned at all but am familiar with the concept/process. My question is how to do it with smoked salmon. It is already smoked, so it doesn't need to be cooked, just enough heat to initiate the sealing process. Any thoughts from the pros that have canned smoked salmon before?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cwm907 View Post
    how to do it with smoked salmon. It is already smoked, so it doesn't need to be cooked, just enough heat to initiate the sealing process. Any thoughts from the pros that have canned smoked salmon before?
    I'm not a pro, but I do can salmon for my family and no one has died yet.

    The crack about death isn't random; if you don't can it right you can get botulism. The best way to get botulism is to do what you said above ("just enough heat to initiate...").

    UAF Extension is the best source for great info and even services (they'll inspect/test your canner to see if its safe) on canning. Here is there web page where that info can be gotten (for free).

    Don't take canning lightly or cut any corners.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwm907 View Post
    Not trying to hijack the thread, but build on what is evolving. I have never canned at all but am familiar with the concept/process. My question is how to do it with smoked salmon. It is already smoked, so it doesn't need to be cooked, just enough heat to initiate the sealing process. Any thoughts from the pros that have canned smoked salmon before?
    smoked or not.. fish, meats etc... minimum 10 lbs for 110 minutes

    i have had some seals not hold up to the salmon oils over time.. the red seals seemed to go bad sooner so i only buy the ball gray ones now, and have not lost any more ... nothing like opening a case and finding them all spoiled.


    if your smoking for canning smoke it less, get the flavor on it and then cook it in canner.. if your like jerky smoked salmon.. FREEZE IT it will can up and be like chalk when stored.

    i put up about 100 pints a year now.. down from the 200 a year i used to... clean jars, clean bands... clean canners, packed tightly 3/4-7/8 full and canned 10 lbs 110 minutes. the hard part is learning the canner its self... and trusting you got all the air vented before capping it...
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    Thanks for the info guys. That makes sense.

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    smoked or not.. fish, meats etc... minimum 10 lbs for 110 minutes

    i have had some seals not hold up to the salmon oils over time.. the red seals seemed to go bad sooner so i only buy the ball gray ones now, and have not lost any more ... nothing like opening a case and finding them all spoiled.


    if your smoking for canning smoke it less, get the flavor on it and then cook it in canner.. if your like jerky smoked salmon.. FREEZE IT it will can up and be like chalk when stored.

    i put up about 100 pints a year now.. down from the 200 a year i used to... clean jars, clean bands... clean canners, packed tightly 3/4-7/8 full and canned 10 lbs 110 minutes. the hard part is learning the canner its self... and trusting you got all the air vented before capping it...
    Agreed. Everything I've ever read about canning salmon says 10 or 11 lbs. for 110 min. I've been doing it that way for many years now, without a single issue. I've never had it around for more than about a year (it usually gets eaten before that), but so far have not had a single fail. I just canned up 4 cases a couple days ago.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cwm907 View Post
    Not trying to hijack the thread, but build on what is evolving. I have never canned at all but am familiar with the concept/process. My question is how to do it with smoked salmon. It is already smoked, so it doesn't need to be cooked, just enough heat to initiate the sealing process. Any thoughts from the pros that have canned smoked salmon before?
    cwm907
    to quote from an old UAA pamphlet on canning salmon.
    Quote..
    Even though the Salmon are actually cooked before canning, the full process time for sterilization must be used for shelf storage at room temperature. Only then can you be sure that no harmful bacteria (botulinus) is present unquote Also to re-emphasize what someone already stated. Canning intensifies the smoke flavor, The UAA ext pamphlet recommends a light cold smoke for best results. What I think it really boils down to is the old personal preference thing. So, you have to experiment a little to figure out what you like and what you prefer.

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    I do three pans of wood in my little chiefs, about 45 minutes to an hour or so. When the oils start to show up on your pieces, pull out and can, after letting it rest for an hour. A tablespoon of Olive oil and half a raw jalapenio. Good to go
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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