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Thread: Hunting partner is lost what to not do.

  1. #1
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    Default Hunting partner is lost what to not do.

    I was reading threw my hunting notes and saw this story and posted it last years. With hunting season only a few week away it time to think about what could happen.

    A few years ago I was hunting with a Group of guys that were very experience bow hunters one of the guys and his son (25 years old) shot a moose and follow it off the trail. By the time they gutted the animal it was dark and with out a compass or GPS, they headed in the general direction of the swamp only 4 or 5 hundred yards away. As they were getting closed to the swamp his hunting partner that he hunted with for several years. Realizing they were lost he fire a shot in the air and headed down to the lower end of the swamp and fires again he continue going back and forth all night. Mike and his son hear the first shot and headed in that direction before they get to the swamp they heard the 2nd shot and turned around and headed in that direction. This continuum all night into Jack ran out of ammunition and sometime between 1 and 2 am they came walking into camp.

    There were so many mistakes made by both partner including not having a few items like a
    whistles, compass, flashlight and another two or three boxes of 44 bullets. Need less to say there were no moose withing 5 miles of camp after all the shooting.

  2. #2
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Good topic.

    Pre-hunt planning should include a basic what-to-do plan for lost or injured partner(s). Make sure everyone in camp is on the same page.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I once spent the night under a tree on Montague Island. It was no big deal because I had a very detailed plan spelled out with the guy I was hunting with. If I didn't return by dark (it was November, so that was fairly early) he wasn't to search for me until daylight. I woke up at twilight and finished the last mile to the cabin where breakfast was waiting. It was no big deal because I carried fire starter and an emergency shelter (old tent rainfly) along with enough clothes in my pack. I don't stumble around in the dark. I stay put.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Yep make shelter and enjoy the stars.If unprepared learn from it.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Yeah, I agree. Good topic. I had to laugh, because this story sound so familiar. Something very similar to this happened to a buddy of mine a few years ago. We were on a float hunt together. His son shot a moose that I helped call in. We butchered the moose, and each of us threw a quarter on our backs and proceeded back to camp. I can't remember why, but we split up (mistake #1). To make a long story short, I made it back to camp with the quarter but he and his son didn't show up. Meanwhile, while I made a couple more trips back to the kill site for some meat, while my buddies Dad (and the boy's grandpa) was worried sick back at camp waiting for his son and grandson. So he fired off a few rounds to try to help him orient himself. He had some walkie talkies with him, but they were low on batteries (mistake #2). After firing the shots, they managed to make limited radio contact. Apparently he didn't have a GPS or compass with him (mistake #3). They were both dehydrated and hungry without food or water (mistake #4), and they were still both packing some moose quarters (mistake #5). We ended up firing more and more shots to help them find there way down to the river, so they could find there way back to camp. I believe all the commotion ended up scaring all the game from the area (mistake #6), because we only ended up taking 1 moose from that area, when the year before we had taken 2 moose and a caribou from the exact same spot. So, I agree with you. I think the lesson we all learned was to always be prepared (food, water, shelter, navigational devices, weapon, batteries, etc.) and probably best to stick together.

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    A member here lost a good friend from him splitting up with someone while hunting in the mountains after goats. Splitting up can be one of the most dangerous things. Having basic survival gear with you at all time leaving camp is probably one of the best way to ensure that you can survive an unexpected condition.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Good Post MacGyver,
    Splitting up almost always is a bad idea, and in todays world of gizmos there are not many reasons to not carry some form of guidence as simple as a compass or a $50.00 Bushnell GPS..
    One night we were camped in the New Mexico MTNS on a elk/deer archery hunt and one of our party of 3 got lost. We sat in camp and honked the horn on our vehicle every 15 minutes until he made it back in around midnight. There were 2 or 3 other tent camps within a couple hundred yards of ours and I don't think we made any friends that night...
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Usually, the safest place to be is right where you are. Don't just do something, sit there. My emergency items include fire starter, extra batteries for all electronics (including the range finder), electronics such as a gps and radio, headlamp, food, water (and a way to make safe water), and a space blanket for shelter. I have some flagging with me to mark my trail in and out of a kill sight so packing at night is a little easier for everyone. All that extra gear weighs ounces and takes up very little room in the pack. The batteries can be switched between devices.

    Our shooting sequence to signal an emergency is 3 shots in a specific order. One shot then 5 seconds and two very quick shots. We use marine radios in our group since we hunt out of boats. We are better able to hail other boats and each other if we happen to be using the boat radio. Good thread. It's a good idea to have a plan in place before it hits the fan.

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    Always, Always carry a radio. If you're hunting in a group set-up specific call-in times. We always have specific times as well as calling in after shooting. Batteries are cheap and light, always have extra. Around here we all carry VHF radios. You can contact your hunting group, a passing boat or plane, or when needed get a call into the Coast Guard for a helo pick-up. There's no excuse to not carry some basic communication tools. Those little Motorola radios that are $50 for a set have a 2-3 mile radius and work perfect for communicating with other members of the group.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    I guess I misread the regs... I understood no radios for communication while hunting... Am I wrong?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sambuck12 View Post
    I guess I misread the regs... I understood no radios for communication while hunting... Am I wrong?
    You just can't use them to aid in actual hunting.........not for using them for help in an emergency or other things that don't involve hunting. You can use ANY type of radio in an emergency at any time.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    My understanding is radios are not allowed to aid in taking game but are allowed for safety. Nothing about carrying a radio to call in an air strike, pizza or pickup after hunting. When shots are fired in our area, we get on the radio to see if somebody has one down. If a moose is shot, the person that shot it gets on the radio pretty quick to tell everybody that all is well and to come help. The radio is not used to take game, it is already taken. If nobody gets on the radio for 30 min or so, we turn them back off. We don't hunt with them on, too much risk of them squawking at the wrong time. We have been known to leave it on in camp if others are out and about though.

    It would be silly to not let hunters use a radio, they are a vital tool to group safety.

    What about cell phones? There are plenty of places that there is good coverage in a hunting area. They are illegal to use too for taking game, but not to call your wife and let her know you are ok or that you are going to be late (again). Or to call the state trooper because you have a lost person incident and would love to have Helo1 help you out. How many remote hunting parties have a sat phone? Hopefully all of them.

    It is also a very hard rule to regulate I would imagine. Interesting debate for sure.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    I was reading threw my hunting notes and saw this story and posted it last years. With hunting season only a few week away it time to think about what could happen.

    A few years ago I was hunting with a Group of guys that were very experience bow hunters one of the guys and his son (25 years old) shot a moose and follow it off the trail. By the time they gutted the animal it was dark and with out a compass or GPS, they headed in the general direction of the swamp only 4 or 5 hundred yards away. As they were getting closed to the swamp his hunting partner that he hunted with for several years. Realizing they were lost he fire a shot in the air and headed down to the lower end of the swamp and fires again he continue going back and forth all night. Mike and his son hear the first shot and headed in that direction before they get to the swamp they heard the 2nd shot and turned around and headed in that direction. This continuum all night into Jack ran out of ammunition and sometime between 1 and 2 am they came walking into camp.

    There were so many mistakes made by both partner including not having a few items like a
    whistles, compass, flashlight and another two or three boxes of 44 bullets. Need less to say there were no moose withing 5 miles of camp after all the shooting.
    Way to put the need to take a whistle into perspective.

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    My wife just brought out the text for the class "managing the lost person incident". Here are some interesting topics we have been discussing.

    Lost persons behave similarly and you can use that behavior to help find them. Hunters do things differently than most other lost persons. They tend to travel longer distances, overextend themselves and travel through darkness, become disoriented while tracking game, and will follow a natural drainage. They may opt to "bushwhack". Many will build a shelter and will be found walking out the next day. Ego and maybe hunting regulations compel hunters to attempt to walk out on their own, thus causing the far distances traveled. They often use shots to help locate them and will respond to sounds if able.

    Of course, they never stop to ask directions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daved View Post
    Of course, they never stop to ask directions.


    My hunting partner, had a hunter come up to him and ask how to get back to the trail. When he was told ware the trail was, he argue with him about the location and left. Some men just can not be helped when it comes to direction. LOL

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    Keeping people safe is never old information.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    Keeping people safe is never old information.

    you work for that "learn to return" crew in anchorage?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    you work for that "learn to return" crew in anchorage?
    What an odd question? Why should you care if I do or not?
    Are you accusing me trying to give free advertising to “Learn to return”?

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    no, was just wondering, as your advice is always very well thought out. you'd be an excellent, well trained, well prepared asset to any hunting party IMO.

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    I've never works for “learn to return”. But I do work for my wife when she needs me.

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