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Thread: Halibut Habitat out of Seward

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Default Halibut Habitat out of Seward

    I've been fishing Homer and Seward now for about 10 years now for Halibut. I've always looked for sandy bottoms with drop offs and done well, mostly out of Homer. Seward, Not so much. Not too much sand out of seward that I've been able to find on charts. I've got a few holes that I've done decent on but they are hot one week and cold the next in the Chiswell area. I've never really gone left yet. We've had some luck catching a few while drifting over rock piles for Yelloweye and Lings but few and far between. What kind of terrain do you fish? Mud to Rock Lines? Mud? Rock? Gravel? River Mouths when Salmon are running?

    Looking for any pointers as I will fish Seward exclusively at the end of this month into August. Any 100+ pound Hens get a picture and released. As much as I love Homer, shutting down Tanner Crab this year has put me into gear to set shrimp pots and prospect out of Seward and fish as well for Halibut, Rockfish, Silvers and Lings. While your out there, if you see the Danielle Rae, give me a shout! Those willing to share will get Shrimp Reports if I have any sucess finding shrimp.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Advice I've been given but haven't had a chance to try out yet is to fish the points where the bays to the NE enter the gulf in 180-300' of water, Day Harbor et al.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Thanks Paul, I'll give it a try. A little surprized, 135 looks and 1 reply. Must be tough out there! LOL Thanks Skinny for the PM!!!

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    Member SkinnyRaven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chico99645 View Post
    Thanks Paul, I'll give it a try. A little surprized, 135 looks and 1 reply. Must be tough out there! LOL Thanks Skinny for the PM!!!
    You're welcome, I expect to see some pictures posted. I won't be back in town before next week.

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkinnyRaven View Post
    You're welcome, I expect to see some pictures posted. I won't be back in town before next week.
    I'm stuck at work for another week and a half. I'll be hitting Seward on 27 July. Hope to see you on the water! When I do, I will show you on the chart where my wifes 26 pound yellow eye came from last year along with 6 more yellow eye from 14-20 pounds.

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    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Some general things I've discovered over the years:

    1. Look for plateaus and pinnacles where there isn't anything else and anchor on them. I've found a couple of spots out in the middle, very deep water generally, where it suddenly shoots up to 100-200'. Stop and fish spots like that any time you find them. There are some so small they don't show up on the normal charts, so watch your depth as you move. The ones I know are to the East.

    2. Fish channels betweens islands on tide changes. Again, anchor up. Don't worry too much about depth. They follow the current and the food. The biggest fish I've ever caught were in less than 100' of water.

    3. I believe in chumming and creating a good scent trail. Chum bombs are an easy way to do this but you will go through a ton of bait. I recommend grabbing some salmon carcasses from cleaning tables the night before you head out. Fill a 5-gallon bucket with chopped up bait so it's prepped before you go. It can suck to chop bait if you're rolling in a good swell.

    Bottom type doesn't seem to matter as much as overall structure and tidal current in my experience. Also if one type of bait isn't producing, switch it up. I've had days where halibut ignore salmon and/or herring but we've killed them on jigs.

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coho slayer View Post
    Some general things I've discovered over the years:

    1. Look for plateaus and pinnacles where there isn't anything else and anchor on them. I've found a couple of spots out in the middle, very deep water generally, where it suddenly shoots up to 100-200'. Stop and fish spots like that any time you find them. There are some so small they don't show up on the normal charts, so watch your depth as you move. The ones I know are to the East.

    2. Fish channels betweens islands on tide changes. Again, anchor up. Don't worry too much about depth. They follow the current and the food. The biggest fish I've ever caught were in less than 100' of water.

    3. I believe in chumming and creating a good scent trail. Chum bombs are an easy way to do this but you will go through a ton of bait. I recommend grabbing some salmon carcasses from cleaning tables the night before you head out. Fill a 5-gallon bucket with chopped up bait so it's prepped before you go. It can suck to chop bait if you're rolling in a good swell.

    Bottom type doesn't seem to matter as much as overall structure and tidal current in my experience. Also if one type of bait isn't producing, switch it up. I've had days where halibut ignore salmon and/or herring but we've killed them on jigs.

    Coho Slayer

    Thanks for you input. I usually use a chum back along with an absorb pad soaked in Herring oil. I've hit some of those plateaus but have had little luck. Since sand is so rare in Seward Area, have you had better luck in a rocky bottom, gravel bottom, Shale, or Mud? I've fished the 50 fathom lines as well and have mainly been hit and miss with little regularity. Good one day, dead the next. I know its called fishing not catching, but IMO, Homer has been so easy for me to find Halibut consistantly and Seward, not so much. As far as Ling, Yellow Eye, Salmon and Big Black Bass, Seward has been very good to me.

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    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chico99645 View Post
    Coho Slayer

    Thanks for you input. I usually use a chum back along with an absorb pad soaked in Herring oil. I've hit some of those plateaus but have had little luck. Since sand is so rare in Seward Area, have you had better luck in a rocky bottom, gravel bottom, Shale, or Mud? I've fished the 50 fathom lines as well and have mainly been hit and miss with little regularity. Good one day, dead the next. I know its called fishing not catching, but IMO, Homer has been so easy for me to find Halibut consistantly and Seward, not so much. As far as Ling, Yellow Eye, Salmon and Big Black Bass, Seward has been very good to me.
    It seems like I've had the best luck on rocky bottoms. A lot of the time we've gotten a mix of rockfish/lings/halibut. Some places definitely have more halibut than others, though. Not sure what motivates to be in one spot over another. I think they are more dependent on the currents and where the currents carry the bait than anything else. I'm not a pro, though. I'm sure some folks, Capt. Andy for instance, would be able to add a lot to this discussion because they have way more experience. It's honestly been a few years since I've had a boat to go out on, so things may be different now.

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coho slayer View Post
    It seems like I've had the best luck on rocky bottoms. A lot of the time we've gotten a mix of rockfish/lings/halibut. Some places definitely have more halibut than others, though. Not sure what motivates to be in one spot over another. I think they are more dependent on the currents and where the currents carry the bait than anything else. I'm not a pro, though. I'm sure some folks, Capt. Andy for instance, would be able to add a lot to this discussion because they have way more experience. It's honestly been a few years since I've had a boat to go out on, so things may be different now.

    The current moving bait makes lots of sense I have best luck out of homer where the tide tends to rip, but I move before it rips to much. The rocky bottom surprises me, but then again its a different area, to I will give it a shot. Thanks for sharing and the PM.

    Mark

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