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Thread: shooting problem anyone have a solution

  1. #1
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    Default shooting problem anyone have a solution

    I've only been deer hunting for the last 2 years down here in southeast, juneau to be exact. I for some reason will close my shooting eye while pulling the trigger any reason why, and any way to overcome it so i get more acurate marks on the paper instead of it being so scattered.-john

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    Default Shooting difficulties

    "I for some reason will close my shooting eye while pulling the trigger"

    This to me sounds like you are "flinching". What caliber are you using? If you are not use to shooting a high powered rifle, your body will react be closing one eye, yanking the triger instead of squeezing, etc.

    The best way to cure this would be to shoot a .22 rimfire a lot. Get the essentials back-
    1. Trigger squeeze- Should feel like you are trying to break an egg in an controlled manner
    2. Aiming-make things as steady as possible w/good posture, relying on bone structure, not muscle.
    3. Calling your shot, following through, whatever you want to call it. You should have picture in your mind of what the crosshairs looked like the instant the gun went off. If you are closing your shooting eye, you dont have this, and are probably jerking the trigger also.

    So shoot a .22 a lot, than gradually work up to the centerfire. Use a recoil pad or a towel under your shirt. Lastly you dont need a whiz bang magnum to kill stuff.

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    i'm shoot'n a 30.06, i've shot it 6-10 boxes of shells and i still close my eye...i don't have a .22 and I ain't about to go out and buy one i won't close my eye.

  4. #4

    Default Flinching

    Perhaps try some snap-caps, you can do this at home. The problem is most likely that you are anticipating the recoil. The problem is all in you head. You just have to force yourself to keep your eyes open.

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    Default Shooting problems

    Make sure the rifle is unloaded and do multiple dry-fire sessions.

    Then, next time you head out to the range go through your normal shooting routine, then have a friend load your rifle. Ocassionally have him give the rifle back to you w/ an empty chamber. If you flinch/close your eye on the empty chamber you still havent cured your problem, so more dry firing. It is a mental effort.

    .22's are cheap, and extremely valuable for honing one's shooting fundamentals.

  6. #6

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    This is something I picked up from one of the gun rags when I was a kid. Get a Red Rider bb gun. Use something soft like a small apple and toss it out a few yards. Don't aim, point with both eyes open and keep them open throughout the shot. Since there is no real noise or recoil it's pretty easy. Shoot the apple. You will be able to see it move but it won't richocette. Keep moving the target farther out until you can hit it 20 out of 20 times. Now you have trained your eyes and hands to get on target without flinching at the pull of the trigger. When you move to your rifle shoot the scope with both eyes open. I will be natural and with a little practice your dominate eye will just take over automatically. Wear the best hearing protection you can afford and install something like a Limbsaver recoil pad so you feel a push not a smack on your shoulder. Do a search for some of the techinque threads on this site and learn how to make a proper pocket and firmly mount the gun. You can shoot a lot of bbs without disturbing the neighbors, or having to go to the range, or emptying your wallet. It taught me to use my scope properly, and to acquire targets for wingshooting. I'm not saying I never miss or flat out blow an easy opportunity, but my son-in-law jokingly calls me pappy deadeye. Most of my hunting is varmints and pheasant and I don't waste a whole lot of ammo. But I literally went through dozens of boxes of 1000 round bbs shooting windfall apples, corncobs, and dirt clods at 5 to 15 yards. (don't forget to wear safety glasses)

  7. #7

    Talking shut eye

    I'm wondering if you're just blinking or if you are really shutting your eyes. Blinking is a natural reaction to loud noise combined with recoil. Most of us do it without realizing because it's so fast. I have personally found out that shooting the shotgun sports like skeet, sporting clays and trap, have helped my rifle shooting in so many aspects that this could be a very viable option. It helps reflexs, concentration or focus, trigger control, nervousness, and desensitizes one to recoil(this one still amazes me) plus you'll have fun. I guess if none of all this advise everyone has given you helps, then there is supergluing a small piece of velcro to eyelid and eyebrow. Small fish hook on line would work but the pain will destroy your focus and frankly, I just think toothpicks...is a dumb idea.

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default

    First of all, do you know which is your dominant eye?
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    "I could have sworn the sights were perfectly aligned on the deer's shoulder when I closed my eyes and yanked the trigger."

    Remember, keeping at least one eye open will improve your chances of a hit.

    My guess is you have no training in the fine art of shooting. My guess is you just one day went out and bought a rifle and went deer hunting. Don't feel all alone. Most of the people in the U.S. who hunt deer have done just that.

    Some of us grew up shooting a 22 rifle. We were the guys who scored expert in the military with what ever rifle we were issued.

    As has been pointed out, your eye closing is likely part of a well coordinated flinch that is very deeply rooted. I would say that of all the 120-200 rounds you have shot have helped to embed that flinch and make it a part of your shooting.

    The 22 rimfire is a good idea. What do you have for a rifle and is it scoped?
    Are you closing both eyes at the shot? This is going to take some work.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    so I went out today and still same thing, i'm not closing both eyes just my scope eye (right eye) and i close it just as i squeeze the trigger, I did notice that some times I was going to shoot and noticed myself jerk but it feels a little bit more confident when i do pull the trigger, I've tried dry firing and I try fire fine, don't close my eye when i pull the trigger, Maybe I better go get me a $150 .22 and put a scope on it and see if that helps, or do I even need to put a scope on it. I used to shoot bb guns as a kid and never closed my eyes then...maybe it is the recoil that is scaring me but over the 200+ rounds i've shot the recoil doesn't bother me its just ingrained in my head...i even tried shooting with my left hand fingers and holding my eye open with my right hand and I still blinked it when i pulled the trigger...it's really quite aggrivating...any more pointers?-J.howard

  11. #11

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    Try shooting from a standing position. Point the gun at the target, but when you shoot don't aim so much as point. Concentrate more on keeping your eyes open. Stand so that you can allow the gun to push you back. Don't fight the recoil. Hopefully after awhile you will get over the problem.

    When you squeeze the trigger, do you put tension on it then jerk?

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    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    As the piano teachers tell their students: "Practice doesn't make perfect. Practice makes permanent."

    With 200 rounds in, you're not to permanent yet, but you have some unlearning to do. If you can wait, mail-order some snap caps. If not, go ahead and overpay Rayco for some.

    Keep the dry-fire exercises going, and slow down your trigger squeeze. It should be a surprise when the pin finally goes 'click.'

    You can't hit what you can't see, so this is worth putting in some hours. I'll also second the idea of going to the range with a friend who can load a snap cap some times and live rounds at random intervals.

    Keep at it, 200 rounds to ingrain a habit will likely take 400 to unlearn...

  13. #13

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    My dad cured my best friend's similar problem (but with revolvers) by loading his gun for him - he'd leave 1-6 chambers empty at random and kept doing it every time they went target practicing. That technique has already been mentioned on this thread; depending on the gun you can do the same thing by mixing snap caps in with live ammo.

    What I do is load up my gun with snap caps at home and dryfire over and over until the only thing moving is my trigger finger: gently squeeze that trigger until the gun clicks, keep it squeezed for another full second, then release. Do it enough and you won't blink, and you should be able to blance a quarter on your front sight without it falling off as you dryfire.

    When you go to the range you can wear a pad on your shoulder and rifle shooting gloves on your hands to help absorb recoil, and it might be good to wear both earplugs and earmuffs. Find a nice, tame load for your gun, have someone load your gun for you with snap caps mixed in at random. Hopefully you won't flinch or blink when you pull the trigger on a snapcap.

    I remember Massad Ayoob had a book called "Stressfire" or something, where he teaches how to shoot even though you're tense. It might be a useful read.

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    Member Whitetail1der's Avatar
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    You need to stop anticipating the shot when shooting. Focus all of your thoughts on breathing properly, target acquisition, cross hair focus, and then gently squeezing the trigger. Give no thought what so ever to actually hitting the target, just everything I mentioned. The shot should come as a surprise to you. Have a knowledgeable person check your trigger pull weight too. It might be too much for you and need adjusting. Then again...perhaps a .30-06 is too much for you at this time and you need to work up to it. Just my 2 cents.

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    A long trigger pull can also help cause flinching. You may consider taking your rifle to the gunsmith and having the trigger smoothed out. It costs about 50 bucks. Every shot should almost be a surprise.

    -Eric

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    ak - I live in Juneau as well - If you need some help overcoming this bad habit - Send me a pm and I will take you out to the range sometime and work with ya!

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    I have the same problem. I got scoped when I was teenager...

    Lots of time with my 10-22 helps. I also have a 30-30 that I am working with.
    I am now shooting with both eyes open (when using the scope) and can see the muzzle blast more often than not with it, and almost no flinch with the .22.

    I have found that stiff or long trigger pulls are the worst as they let me build anticipation.

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