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Thread: Chicken Coop Pics and Ideas

  1. #1
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    Default Chicken Coop Pics and Ideas

    Planning on building a chicken coop and looking for some pictures and ideas.
    Anything you would have done different?
    We live in Seward so ours will need to be strong enough to handle a heavy snow load.

  2. #2
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    Pretty good information on here a while ago with many ideas.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...t=chicken+coop

    Good luck

  3. #3
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    I dont have any pics but I built a small flat roof coop approx 4' x 6' in size with a gravity feed box(holds 50lb bag of feed) that slides in and out of the wall and has two nesting boxes. Feeding and watering a small flock is minimal. Everything is accessed from outside the coop.

  4. #4
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    Default Chicken Coop Pics and Ideas

    Hey captain Ben,
    I don't have any good pictures but I have made three coops in four years and made a ton of mistakes. Our first coop was a 6x8 flat roof coop ( a modified boat engine crate). It was ok in the sturdy department but you had to stoop over to work in it or get eggs. Retired that one to supply storage and built an A frame coop, we had a man door and the back opened up so you could shovel the litter out the back.... Still awkward to work in though. After that and a spring massacre by brown bear and then dogs ( lost 9 hens and had a very mad/sad wife) we gave up and built a shed!
    The new coop is 9x12 with 7 foot walls and a 9 foot peak. It all 2x6 framing with a man size door. We opted to go in to get our eggs, so nest boxes are inside. We are planning on closing off the front portion with wire so you can step inside and not have to walk in the droppings but still collect eggs and feed them. Wired for lites and heated water with a motion sensor outside to discourage predators. I set it up with a plug out side so you run an extension cord to it for power supply....then it's Mobil if you want to move it or what not. It's still not perfect but it's strong and comfortable to work in with room to expand to accommodate more birds in the future. One suggestion I have I that you should install a poop board under the roost, saves litter and makes cleaning easier. Hope you can learn from some of my mistakes, the key was used materials from Craig's list to keep cost down and don't give up looking for ideas to make it better!

  5. #5
    Member cod's Avatar
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    BACKYARDCHICKENS.COM..................Says my wife who built one this past summer on her own. Hers is about 3 by 5 ft and sits off the grd a couple feet. Its on wheels so that a guy can move it around if one wants. We have 3 chickens and they started laying for us in Nov. We have added a screened in 3 by 5 ft addition to the coop that allows them to come out and play under the coop or in the addition that was added. The chickens are enjoyable to me. I've seen the site I mentioned.....It will give millions of ideas....good luck and enjoy....cod
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  6. #6
    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    I'd like to see your coop pics, I got 2 coops I've made last year . You might want to google backyard chickens dot con they have a great forum and lots of Alaskans and plans
    Semper Fi!

  7. #7
    Member cod's Avatar
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    Default wife built chicken coop

    chick coop 3.jpg The 2 front swinging doors have plastic sheets stapled to the wire screened swinging doors (temp) to help keep the heat in for the colder weather. One can see the laying box sticking out on the left side with hinged pop open lid for access. (you may notice the sheet of t-111 just laying up against the laying box. That is temporary to keep the cold north wind off them a bit). Below the coop, and the penned in area to the right of the coop has that cheepo green plastic webbing. The extra pen area to the right was framed w. three quarter inch white pvc plastic tubing. She just plastic strapped the webbing to the piping. Very lite to move. Notice wheels.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  8. #8
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    IMAG0450.jpg
    Thanks for the advice everyone.
    I guess I should have removed the post but, we ended up finding someone locally selling a used coop for a around a couple hundred bucks. I figured I could not buy the lumber I needed to build one for that price. Inside there is a tack room, full electrical, and an insulated coop. Thanks to a flatbed tow truck we had it picked up, set it on pier blocks, and built a covered outdoor run. We now have 20 happy hens that lay well and are amateur chicken farmers. Learning and making little mistakes along the way but having fun and eating fresh eggs. In the spring we will put on a fresh coat of paint and spiff it up a little.

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