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Thread: How much air ?

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    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Default How much air ?

    So I have a zodiac on top my boat at night it deflates a little when the sun comes up it fills back up. So my question is how much air can I pump in it before it "POPS" How firm should the tubes be or whats a good way to check? It has a wooden floor and I do not want it to shift or fall at night then when the sun comes up it inflates it and pokes a hole in it because the floor shifted.
    Thanks
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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Check with Zodiac on the psi. You can get a small raft pressure gauge from NRS and other sites that reads 1-5 psi (or so). Upon knowing the suggested psi from Zodiac on your boat, you would be set. As sun heats boat, pressure goes up. Cooler days and at night, pressure drops a bit. If boat is not for emergencies you might just keep it slightly under inflated. If a emergency life raft or such, just keep an eye on it, especially during warm sunny days. These are just casual suggestions of course. Things you already know I am sure. Just felt compelled to reply since nobody else has in two days. Perhaps someone with other insights will chime in.


    Dan

  3. #3

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    most raft manufacturers recommend 3psi, by feel it's tight. Thumb test the tubes with downward pressure and you'll be able to depress the tubes 1/4" or so. You probably won't be able to put more than 4.5psi in the tubes with a standard air pump.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger View Post
    So I have a zodiac on top my boat at night it deflates a little when the sun comes up it fills back up. So my question is how much air can I pump in it before it "POPS" How firm should the tubes be or whats a good way to check? It has a wooden floor and I do not want it to shift or fall at night then when the sun comes up it inflates it and pokes a hole in it because the floor shifted.
    Thanks
    Before a best answer here... always good to know what model/year boat your Zodiac is. This would determine, fabrication/material, valve-type, recommended PSI ranges, etc. Based on what it sounds like (my assumption from a smaller inflatable for ship to shore use) --- the boat in question is a lighter-duty boat.


    #1 Recognize the fact that pretty much all 'Zodiac' valves (every model/style!) leak as in bubble on a SOAP CHECK without a cap (like 85-95%!!!). Due to too small and too light diaphragm design.

    #2 They must have a cap securely on and also inspect all O-rings - they must be fitted and in good shape. Good idea to have both items in a comprehensive repair kit.

    Hard to say exactly why your boat is not having sound air retention and may be in some form of disrepair...?

    Issue however remains that the boat is not holding air well enough to your liking over a certain amount of time. The catch is NOT how much air or PSI you attempt to WANT to put in ---- it's more matter of what PSI (regards to any issue with the boat) is able to retain (may be just boat shape and not holding topped off pressure).

    In other words... it really does not matter how much you pump it up (as in adding little more to additional/extra top off)... it simply will not hold it. The more you put in --- the faster it will actually escape to its present equilibrium of condition so to speak until boat is fixed to spec or better! All the pressure gauges to minimal tube deflection (tho' all good ideas) won't amount to much given the problem described.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Richardson View Post
    Before a best answer here... always good to know what model/year boat your Zodiac is. This would determine, fabrication/material, valve-type, recommended PSI ranges, etc. Based on what it sounds like (my assumption from a smaller inflatable for ship to shore use) --- the boat in question is a lighter-duty boat.


    #1 Recognize the fact that pretty much all 'Zodiac' valves (every model/style!) leak as in bubble on a SOAP CHECK without a cap (like 85-95%!!!). Due to too small and too light diaphragm design.

    #2 They must have a cap securely on and also inspect all O-rings - they must be fitted and in good shape. Good idea to have both items in a comprehensive repair kit.

    Hard to say exactly why your boat is not having sound air retention and may be in some form of disrepair...?

    Issue however remains that the boat is not holding air well enough to your liking over a certain amount of time. The catch is NOT how much air or PSI you attempt to WANT to put in ---- it's more matter of what PSI (regards to any issue with the boat) is able to retain (may be just boat shape and not holding topped off pressure).

    In other words... it really does not matter how much you pump it up (as in adding little more to additional/extra top off)... it simply will not hold it. The more you put in --- the faster it will actually escape to its present equilibrium of condition so to speak until boat is fixed to spec or better! All the pressure gauges to minimal tube deflection (tho' all good ideas) won't amount to much given the problem described.
    Yeah, Brian helped me solve this problem on my raft (Achilles, in my case) last year and in the end all my valves were good, it just needed $2 worth of O rings. Definitely worth taking his advice into consideration.

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