Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: How to make a meat rack?

  1. #1
    Member tekla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    anchorage, alaska
    Posts
    261

    Default How to make a meat rack?

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1341735167.715711.jpg I am going on a float hunt and am trying to come up with a quick way to throw up a meat rack. After having to remake one every night it seams to get tiresome. If you had some brackets that were light weight to use would it be a good idea or not? Here is a set up that I was thinking of going with. It is aluminum and weighs about two pounds each. Just looking for some good ideas of what everyone else uses or if they just lay meat on the ground or build a new rack everynight. Thanks

  2. #2
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,406

    Default

    If weight isn't an issue for you and your on a boat maybe. With something like that you would have to make sure that your braces were the same height which now involves cutting. Some 550 cord weighs ounces and it only takes a couple on minutes to make a tripod or better yet lashing one cross beam to a tree. The other thing is with your set up you now are limited to the diameter size of each piece as well. Nice thought but this isn't the wheel I would try to reinvent.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,590

    Default

    Laying the meat on the ground is not a good idea - too much heat retention. Building a brush pile (enough so meat does not contact the ground) - laying meat on top of the brush - add some more brush & tarp over that. Your brackets would be a good idea for a drop camp - where you'd only have to find (or whittle) the correct diameter poles once, but on a float with multiple camps sounds like a pain.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    214

    Default

    Do yourself a big favor and go order a couple of these DVDs. Larry will show you how to do EVERYTHING on a float hunt including total meat care in good and bad conditions. he also covers everything else you can possibly have a question about.


    http://www.pristineventures.com/products/dvd-library.html

  5. #5

    Default

    I have never had to do this, I assume you are going way up a river and may have to float your way back to civilization or a pickup point with a moose or something. What I would do is just anchor the boat and leave the meat in bags on the floor of the boat, the water is so cold that it would be like putting it in a fridge. whether you made a rack or put it in the canoe, you would have to guard your stuff carefully anyway. if you have a partner, you can just trade watch duties all night, and if it is in the summer, you can just take off downriver anyway at anytime you want. if it is fall, you just pray for daylight and take off as soon as you can.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Girdwood
    Posts
    1,123

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by theunseenowl View Post
    I have never had to do this, I assume you are going way up a river and may have to float your way back to civilization or a pickup point with a moose or something. What I would do is just anchor the boat and leave the meat in bags on the floor of the boat, the water is so cold that it would be like putting it in a fridge. whether you made a rack or put it in the canoe, you would have to guard your stuff carefully anyway. if you have a partner, you can just trade watch duties all night, and if it is in the summer, you can just take off downriver anyway at anytime you want. if it is fall, you just pray for daylight and take off as soon as you can.
    theunseenowl: I disagree with your philosophy and recommendations, as others have repeatedly done as you suggest and the meat spoiled faster.

    General rule of thumb is that the meat needs to be kept cool, dry, and have air circulation around it, hence the need to hang the meat as much as possible.

    Keep in mind that most people use game bags rather than plastic bags when dealing with meats when away in the field. We provide cover to help shield the meats from direct sunlight and rain.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    2,127

    Default

    Laying it on the ground would depend on your weather......last year for moose season we laid tarps and put the moose directly on the gravel as it was colder than I've yet experienced during moose season. Doesn't always work.

    Would not suggest leaving it in the boat. If anything got into it, it's likely to damage your ride out as well. Easiest is tree to tree or at least tree to tripod but would suggest parachute cord and a bowsaw.

    Cool and dry are the most important aspects. But, if things get wet, just make it a priority to dry them out as soon as the opportunity lends itself.

  8. #8
    Member barber8605's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    236

    Default

    I read this about making game bags that are actually big enough for moose.
    "Get hold of some old cotton sheets, not flannel, just plain cotton; queen sized preferably. Fold them lengthwise and sew the "L", now create a drawstring in the other edge and you’ll have a bag that is large enough to fit a half of a Moose or Elk."

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    One of the problems with caring for meat in the field is blood soaked game bags. If you wash a cotton bag it will take for ever to dry and unless you bring soap and bleach you will be putting bacteria cover bags on your meat.
    If you have two sets of T.A.G. Bags you can wash one set in a stream and get all the blood out and they dried very fast. If it cold and there no bugs don't put the bag back on and let the meat air dry.

    If you are a DIY type person you could make light weight, fast drying, breathable game bags out of Tyvek house rap.

  10. #10
    Member tekla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    anchorage, alaska
    Posts
    261

    Default

    I am going on a ten day float hunt and know from experience about trying to build a rack every night. I was just looking for a way to save myself fourty five minutes every day taking down and putting up. I was going to use the aluminum brackets and cut some poles once I get there and bring them with every night. We were going to put some para cord around the center pole and use cord and carabeaners to just hook up and take the bags down every night. I have made alder piles in the past and worked pretty good. We only have one boat so we will no be leavin the meat in the boat every night. Just wanted to throw the bracket idea out there and see what some people thought. Either way I have them made and am bringing them with to give a try. Hope fully I get to the point of needing to hang meat. Thanks

  11. #11
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tekla View Post
    I am going on a ten day float hunt and know from experience about trying to build a rack every night. I was just looking for a way to save myself fourty five minutes every day taking down and putting up. I was going to use the aluminum brackets and cut some poles once I get there and bring them with every night. We were going to put some para cord around the center pole and use cord and carabeaners to just hook up and take the bags down every night. I have made alder piles in the past and worked pretty good. We only have one boat so we will no be leavin the meat in the boat every night. Just wanted to throw the bracket idea out there and see what some people thought. Either way I have them made and am bringing them with to give a try. Hope fully I get to the point of needing to hang meat. Thanks
    If you plan on taking the poles with you as you float down the river, it seems like a good idea to me. Hope fully they will be strong enough. But if that is a concern, you could always prop up a pole in the center as well.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    183

    Default

    Okay, just my opinion but please don't use tyvek for game bags! I do not Have any first hand knowledge but I do know the perm rating a tyvek. And I'd rather use no game bag than tyvek. Some plastics have a higher perm rating than tyvek. Be like putting it in a clear plastic bag, not sure you are getting any airflow over meat

    Personally use either sewed cotton bags, some experience with the caribou bags. Tyvek is for a tent footprint, not game bags.

    Again, my 2 cents, just want discussion before someone actually used tyvek for a game bag
    Or it gets posted here as an option

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •