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Thread: If your STUPID, Pray for S&R

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    Youth and bad judgement go hand in hand. Glad he made it out.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Very fortunate kid to have survived the fall and then to have competent rescuers save him.

    Here's another rescue that was a result of poor judgment.

    http://newsminer.com/view/full_story...w_left_bullets
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Member DanC's Avatar
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    Default These guys weren't stupid but they could have been better prepared.

    Although it is a bit harsh to label someone who is simply out of his/her element as stupid, using other people's mistakes, bad judgement, and bad luck as a learning experience can be very valuable.

    Here is another example of a rescue that eventually worked out and involved both low technology and creativity. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/...pilot-sos.html

    Being more proactive, what can we forum members learn from these examples that would make our own lives safer?

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    Being more proactive, what can we forum members learn from these examples that would make our own lives safer?[/QUOTE]

    The Coast Guard has a mandatory class called TCT/ORM (Team Coordination Training/Operational Risk Management). Essentially, it's a risk management class...sounds boring I know and I think I know why; we all are experienced risk managers of course. I'm not being sarcastic here; it's the truth. You cannot survive without being a risk manager and the older you are the more experienced you become...usually learning from yours (or others) mistakes.

    What people sometimes don't recognize is that we often increase our risks...even when we recognize the activity as risky. There's a theory out there called "risk homeostasis". The idea is that we all have a level of acceptable risk and when we exceed our personal level of acceptable risk (scare ourselves!), we mitigate or reduce the risk (usually by reducing our exposure to the risk). When we get bored, we often 'ratchet up' our risk, usually by increasing our exposure to the risk; thereby attempting to 'maintain' (homeostasis) our level of acceptable risk. When you are with a group of people, you can easily see another persons risk homeostasis level; for example, my wife normally won't try something until she's quite comfortable with her level of control in the particular activity...she took alot longer to learn to ride a motorcycle than I did; my level of acceptable risk for that activity was obviously higher than hers!

    In a group situation, we often see barriers to good risk management; if one person sees something as exceeding their personal risk levels, they will often attempt something regardless simply due to peer pressure; this is common in teenagers for example. If the person was by himself/herself without the peer pressure, they would be much less likely to engage in an activity that exceeds their risk level.

    Much of our success in good risk management lies in our individual abilities to identify the hazards; I often see visitors to Alaska underestimate the physical effects of cold water immersion and because of their lack of knowledge, they don't often identify the hazard properly...which means that they also will fail to properly assess and mitigate. The next two steps are just as critical; Implement Controls and Monitor for Change. This five step risk management process is what we teach along with some skills to help overcome the barriers of communication, decision-making, assertiveness, situational awareness, leadership and adaptability & flexibility. The class takes about 6-8 hours to complete and has reduced small boat and cutter mishaps in the Coast Guard quite dramatically, so we know it works.

    Boat Safer! Mike

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Bad luck or ?

    http://www.adn.com/2011/04/17/181503...-nelchina.html

    http://classic.alaskastar.com/storie...New_ssar.shtml

    Same guy, both snowmachine related. And it aired on TV.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CG Boating Safety View Post
    The Coast Guard has a mandatory class called TCT/ORM (Team Coordination Training/Operational Risk Management). Essentially, it's a risk management class...sounds boring I know and I think I know why; we all are experienced risk managers of course. I'm not being sarcastic here; it's the truth. You cannot survive without being a risk manager and the older you are the more experienced you become...usually learning from yours (or others) mistakes.

    What people sometimes don't recognize is that we often increase our risks...even when we recognize the activity as risky. There's a theory out there called "risk homeostasis"....
    "Risk management" is simply a formal means of defining, describing and applying that which we otherwise know as "common sense". Some people seem more genetically predisposed than others to acquire common sense as they mature, but it seems that most gain sufficient common sense at an early enough age to ensure their day to day survival. Others, not so much. Some of us succumb to accidents not practically avoidable, others are apparently hell bent to tempt Darwinism at every opportunity. Such is life. Hey Bubba, hold my beer and watch this....
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWB View Post
    Bad luck or ?

    http://www.adn.com/2011/04/17/181503...-nelchina.html

    http://classic.alaskastar.com/storie...New_ssar.shtml

    Same guy, both snowmachine related. And it aired on TV.

    Why I own a PLB.

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    [QUOTE=. Hey Bubba, hold my beer and watch this....[/QUOTE]

    You've described my middle son....except...he doesn't drink.

    And, I contend you can not manage risk...only mitigate it.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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