Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 44

Thread: Flesh flies

  1. #1

    Default Flesh flies

    What is the best way to fish flesh flies and is there a specific color that does well? What about weighting the fly vs split shot?

  2. #2

    Default

    Dead drifting in areas that run into pools and where fast current meets slower current. My preferred spot to fish them is in sweepers and log jams where carcasses can get caught on sticks and trees. Also, always worth a shot just below the cleaning tables. I prefer split-shot because I change for each situation and moves better in the water for me.

    As for colors, it really depends on the time of the year and salmon cycles. Investigate the real flesh in the water. Larger pinks, reds, and oranges early. Small whites late. Dirty sock is a popular one.

  3. #3
    Member DannerAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Whiskey River
    Posts
    1,159

    Default

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	russian river july 2012 014.jpg 
Views:	101 
Size:	50.1 KB 
ID:	61229
    here is a little guy i got yesterday using a orange and pink flesh fly. no lead wrap and no splitshot.

  4. #4

    Default

    Where you dead drifting? Also, do you use an indicator or do you short line nymph technique?

  5. #5

    Default

    ThAnks for the info freezerfiller. I have lots of different colors but had someone in a local fly shop who said he guided in Alaska turn me away from the dirty sock colored strips. Should I go get that if I'm fishing early August?

  6. #6

  7. #7

    Default

    That is a box I'm bringing. Am I missing any colors or do I need more than that for a week?

  8. #8
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Spenard
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    Sweet box Foo. You should find some success somewhere in there!

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,592

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foo View Post
    That is a box I'm bringing. Am I missing any colors or do I need more than that for a week?
    If you can bump the bottom & not get hung up as much as I do, you might be ok. I'd need 2x's that many flesh flies for a weeks fishing. you might want to throw in a couple of big articulated flesh flies too.

  10. #10
    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    In a van down by the river
    Posts
    2,039

    Default

    your gonna need a couple more boxes if you fish the parks!

  11. #11

    Default

    More flesh flies or flies in general? I am bringing about 13 boxes with me. I have 2 full of eggs, buggers, streamers. I send a pick in a second. Just wanna make sure I come prepared.

  12. #12

    Default



    These are some of the big fly boxes.

  13. #13
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Holy sh*t...!!!....if you catch on on a imitation mouse I'll eat my hat...!!!......lol.

    And to "Danner" were you using a sinking tip?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    441

    Default

    Sometimes I fish a bead just in front of a weighted flesh fly. Weighted flies seem to cast better for me. I would fish a slightly weighted fly with a section of sinking line behind it and about a 6' leader in between for rainbows. I like a 6 or an 8 wt for late summer rainbows fishing flesh flies, esl variations, egg flies, and pegged beads. I like flies better than beads. I fish the Parks Hwy streams for bows. We also fish a weighted white or flesh colored egg-sucking sparkle leech. White and also purple weighted egg-sucking sparkle leechs work really well at Montana and Willow Creek. On heavier water like the Talkeetna River I often fish the weighted section but I will start out with a floating line and a long leader with a weighted fly. All variations work at times.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    194

    Default

    I think you might be able to find something that will work pretty much anywhere in that fly cache. Yikes!

    I haven't seen green frogs or gray mice up here, but that doesn't mean much. I haven't really looked for them. The ones I have seen are brownish. A pike probably wouldn't care one way or the other. LOL

  16. #16

    Default

    Ill let you know if I catch one on a mouse. Several videos out there talk about mouse patterns and Alaska. For your white bugger patterns is that pure white or cream color throughout? Regular chenille or crystal chenille?

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    194

    Default

    I've had rainbows hit small brown mouse patterns on the Parks streams in late spring/early summer. Never tried during the bead/flesh feeding frenzy. I had never tried them until two years ago when I saw several swimming across Sheep Crk over the course of 4 hrs of fishing. Three of them never completed the voyage.

  18. #18

    Default

    Let's hope my mice don't make it across either.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,592

    Default

    Beads & flesh need to be fished on the BOTTOM. That means lots of hang-ups. It also means lots of break-offs. I've had days when I went through 20-30 beads (that's the same size & color of what was working) - the same would hold true for flesh. It looks to me like you'll be bringing a lot of flies that will never get tied on the line.
    Are you bringing along a small fly tying kit? That & a supply of bunny hair would take care of you, should you lose too many fleshies to rocks & snags.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    975

    Default

    Alaska's trout - and all other fish, of course - are fully aware of the short feeding season and their little brains figured out a long time ago that those pesky red backed voles and such make for a huge meal. The best memory I have of such "mousing" was with a partner when we were fishing a small creek on the Alaska Peninsula where the bows to 25 inches would eagerly smash a small mouse fly. Quite exciting! I'm going to see if I can get a grayling to take one this season.

    Jim

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •