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Thread: 16' Lund for the salt

  1. #1
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Default 16' Lund for the salt

    What's your thoughts on running a 16 foot lund around the bays? Im talking about the v bottom one with tiller steering.

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    Member IglooBoy88's Avatar
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    how big are the waves on average? i wouldnt push my luck with 16ft lunds with the ssv bottoms. from experience things can get nerve wrecking fast....18ft lunds with ssv bottom handle way better in the waves and is more comfy to ride.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    What bays? Southeast, PWS, Cook Inlet-Homer area?
    16' is a bit small to play around in the ocean, in my opinion. Although you see all sorts of craft on the water during Seward Silver derby.
    BK

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Im talking K-bay and seward. Usually I start calling it quits around 3-4 footers. But you know how the weather can blow up fast. Im either looking at a 16 ft lund or this other boat that is a 14' livingston. its a cateraman type boat. Looks pretty stable.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I assume you're considering launching out of Wittier, Seward and Homer? While in perfect conditions such a boat would be suitable, the question is, how often are the conditions perfect when you are able to go boating?

    Based on the conditions I've seen in those waters, and the distances one needs to run to consistantly get into fish, to me the prudent mimimum sized skiff is a 20 footer with a 50 horse outboard. 16 foot inflatable RIB, yes, 16 foot skiff, no. Bigger is always better if you can afford it.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  6. #6

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    I owned the 14 foot Livinston that is on Craigs List FS it is a far better boat than the 16 foot Lund, the motor has very few hrs on it. Extremly stable WA St uses them on there ferrys. It was a very expensive boat new. We took it out of Valdez and the local waters.

  7. #7

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    Hey Matt,

    I've run an 18' tiller model for years, and a bud has run his 14' tiller for even longer. I'd feel over my head (and maybe dead) in 3-4' chop. Slow lazy swells no sweat, but put sudden wind chop on top and you might be kissing your hiney goodbye. We've cut many a trip short due to sudden wind chop of only a foot or so, simply because we were further from the haulout than we wanted to be. Best thing is, with such light boats we can launch from the beach close to the action, rather than having to cross large expanses to get there. That's specific to our location and wouldn't qualify in areas without the road coverage.

    Another consideration is the round chine on them. You won't want folks standing at once or all leaning over one side to see the latest fish. My knick name should be SIT DOWN!!!!!!!! I've yelled it so much over the years. Never shipped any water over the side, but it was close a couple of times.

    As a side note, I'm running a 20' Hewescraft Open Fisherman with a center console now. I park it right next to my Lund, and I kinda shudder. The Lund would disappear inside it. Lotta guys don't consider the OF an "ocean boat." But I keep the Lund because I can launch it in so many places where I can't launch the OF. But it really limits the water I can safely work.

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    I've spent most of my teens and early 20's in 14 foot Lunds, all over S.E. Alaska. Plenty of chop down there and some rough seas but unlike K-bay, there's plenty of decent beaches to go ashore if it get's too bad. Got married in a 18 foot Lund so Lund skiffs are near and dear to my heart, everyone should have one!

    IMO, the risk in K-bay is the difficulty to get to shore if you don't stay ahead of the weather. I own a 16 lund now and the wife, kiddo and I have fished Valdez, Whittier, Seward, Deep Creek, and Homer. It's also a dandy river and lake boat for the valley! BUT, you really need to know your limitations and always error on the side of caution. All boats, regardless of their size are capable of being navigated into danger. Just my thoughts...

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fullboat View Post
    I've spent most of my teens and early 20's in 14 foot Lunds, all over S.E. Alaska. Plenty of chop down there and some rough seas but unlike K-bay, there's plenty of decent beaches to go ashore if it get's too bad. Got married in a 18 foot Lund so Lund skiffs are near and dear to my heart, everyone should have one!

    IMO, the risk in K-bay is the difficulty to get to shore if you don't stay ahead of the weather. I own a 16 lund now and the wife, kiddo and I have fished Valdez, Whittier, Seward, Deep Creek, and Homer. It's also a dandy river and lake boat for the valley! BUT, you really need to know your limitations and always error on the side of caution. All boats, regardless of their size are capable of being navigated into danger. Just my thoughts...
    Some very good points here.

    One year I was stuck running one of our smaller boats up at the lodge here in the NWT.
    It was a Lund 16' Alaskan. And while I had no issues with big water with it I would caution against using small boats in big water if you are not completely comfortable and competent in it's abilities.

    On several occasions I was stuck out in some nasty weather with waves over 8 or 10 feet with 2 paying guests in the boat and I was never worried in my or the boats ability to handle the conditions I was in. Having said that, if I had to run into those waves it would have been another story. I was lucky in that I could surf the waves home or ride the troughs.

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    I used to have a 15' Klamath that we used mostly on lakes and rivers. We did venture to Seward many times but I never felt comfortable going out to far with the family. I prefered the Klamath over a lund as it has a higher/better designed bow for rougher water.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBighorn View Post
    I prefered the Klamath over a lund as it has a higher/better designed bow for rougher water.
    Much as I enjoy the Lund, I respect its limits. And I agree 100% with your Klamath comparison. Our motto with Lunds in the salt is "stay low and watch your butt." They're tippy with the round chine and that squared off stern with the low outboard cut is an invitation for water if you stop suddenly or are overtaken by a breaking following sea. The bow rises quickly in seas due to the V and flare, but the stern is sluggish when you hang a 40 horse and my 230# all the way back.

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    I went and looked at that livingston 14 footer. It looks way better suited for the ocean than a lund. I went ahead and got that. Its actually pretty spacious for a 14' boat.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    What's your thoughts on running a 16 foot lund around the bays? Im talking about the v bottom one with tiller steering.
    I think you'd feel better getting something with higher sides and just a little longer. You might want to venture out a little further sometime and could still feel ok about it. I run an 18' Valco Bayrunner and I was really glad it was at least that big out on Tustumena awhile back. I've been in a Lund on that lake as well and felt like we may all die....

    The other nice thing about the size of the 18' is that I can still launch it off and on the beach or the river with the jeep.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I have a friend who runs out of Homer regularly and catches Halibut in an 18" crestliner with a 40hp on it.
    He only goes out a short distance such as main street hole or behind the spit 1/2 mile out or so. He has gotten halibut each time out this year.
    He has learned not to push his limits and he has run commercial seine fishing skiffs since he was a kid and is very competent in his abilities.
    One thing I have learned is a confident and competent operator in a smaller boat is often times better off than a scared and nervous incompetent/inexperienced operator in a larger boat. At least I feel that way when I am the passenger in the boat.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    I went and looked at that livingston 14 footer. It looks way better suited for the ocean than a lund. I went ahead and got that. Its actually pretty spacious for a 14' boat.
    I think you'll be happy. A bud is a long-time Livingston fan and I've spent a lot of time on the water in a couple of his, some of it rougher than either of us wanted. His 14 was a little cramped for 4 adults and accessories, but was plenty stable. His current 16 is really roomy, but he had to jump to an 85hp to run it because the 50 he took of the 14 just wasn't cutting it. The 14 really scooted with the 50. Your 14 Livingston is a whole lot more boat than a 16 Lund.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Apples and oranges. The Livingston will be a better and more stable sea boat, but if you like clamming, duck hunting, or just hauling up on a beach for a picnic without worrying about the bottom, it is hard to beat a Lund. I don't have one, though I used to run the 18 footers.

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    The Livingston I purchased has stainless steel keel strips for beach landing. They aren't very wide though but I'd feel okay landing on a sandy beach and maybe up to pea size gravel beaches.

    How big of anchor do I need for this boat?

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post

    How big of anchor do I need for this boat?
    My bud is using a 15# Danforth with about 15' of half inch chain on his. The chain may sound excessive, but it adds to the "grab" of a smaller anchor. He was using a 12# Bruce, but even with the weak link had troubles retrieving. Heavier swell/deeper water might call for a bigger anchor. One key he's found for good holding and comfort in a little rougher water is to use an anchor buoy: Let out the anchor and set it, then add appropriate scope. Now tie in the buoy to the anchor line and let out another 20-30' of anchor line. It really helps overcome the surge of the boat that can dislodge an anchor, while taking away some of the "snap" of an anchored boat in sharp seas or swells.

  19. #19

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    I,m not a fan fan of anchoring any boat say off Deep Creek in any big tide. I will anchor in calm conditions or easy tide swings.
    I liked the Livingston when lightly loaded, it draws more water than a conventional hull with heavy loads.

    PM me your number and I,ll call you about your boat. Nice boat and I bet motor does not have 200 hrs on it. With the 4 blade prop does quite well.

  20. #20

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    I have ran my 18 foot Lund Semi-V hull with a 25 hp Yamaha tiller from Juneau, all around douglas, over to Admiralty, all around the Seward area, and Valdez with no problems. I have hit some pretty nasty waves too, over 5 feet. That said, I would be extra careful on open ocean. A 40 to 60 hp is better on this boat tho. I changed over to a 50hp Johnson with a steering wheel and felt like I was leaving a cave for a townhouse.

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