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Thread: yukon river miles-circle to eagle?

  1. #1
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    Default yukon river miles-circle to eagle?

    Any one know the river miles between Circle and Eagle? Thinking of making the run
    Thanks

    GS

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    Member logman 49's Avatar
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    My 8 year old son and I are making that trip next week. It's about 155 river miles from what I can gather.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    sometimes, you need to make many crossings from one side of the wide river to the other. After it's all added up, better bump that 155 figure up substantially. I'd plan fuel for 180-200 real miles.

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    Member f0zzy2's Avatar
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    110 from eagle to Slavden cabin 60 from there to Circle when I did it. A lot of sloughs can get you off coarse so I agree to plan on 180-200 miles

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    Member logman 49's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    sometimes, you need to make many crossings from one side of the wide river to the other. After it's all added up, better bump that 155 figure up substantially. I'd plan fuel for 180-200 real miles.
    Thanks, that's good to know. I see you spend some time up that way, any other advice you can give us?

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Keep a tarp in the bow. When a big black cloud comes over ridges and into the river valley, the thunder and lightning, wind and rain can be so severe, that you have no time to do anything else, but find a place to tie off the boat, get out of it, and wait out the storm cloud under a tarp.

    Run a 100 ft. bow rope into the woods and double stake into the ground if you can't find a sizable tree to tie off to. The water level changes drastically and you might wake up to your bow rope tied off under water. Be mindful of where you stake off the boat, you don't want to camp in an area where wood will float down and bash into your boat(we're talking full sized trees here), so always try to camp in the shallows of an inside bend.

    The second I'm parked for the evening, I get in the habit of shoving a stick into the water's edge to judge the rate of rise before I go to bed.

    Stay away from the shear bluffs when it's raining, powerful rock and mud slides can hit the water with serious force, you don't want to be near it. I've seen boulders the size of a 55 gallon drum fall 400 yards into the river.

    Don't ever forget mosquito net.......even when you go take a crap. A dozen mosquito bites on the junk is not a pleasant feeling.

  7. #7
    Member logman 49's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Keep a tarp in the bow. When a big black cloud comes over ridges and into the river valley, the thunder and lightning, wind and rain can be so severe, that you have no time to do anything else, but find a place to tie off the boat, get out of it, and wait out the storm cloud under a tarp.

    Run a 100 ft. bow rope into the woods and double stake into the ground if you can't find a sizable tree to tie off to. The water level changes drastically and you might wake up to your bow rope tied off under water. Be mindful of where you stake off the boat, you don't want to camp in an area where wood will float down and bash into your boat(we're talking full sized trees here), so always try to camp in the shallows of an inside bend.

    The second I'm parked for the evening, I get in the habit of shoving a stick into the water's edge to judge the rate of rise before I go to bed.

    Stay away from the shear bluffs when it's raining, powerful rock and mud slides can hit the water with serious force, you don't want to be near it. I've seen boulders the size of a 55 gallon drum fall 400 yards into the river.

    Don't ever forget mosquito net.......even when you go take a crap. A dozen mosquito bites on the junk is not a pleasant feeling.
    Thanks Mainer, Great advice.

  8. #8

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    165 miles from Eagle to Circle anyway you look at it. There are only 2 bad spots for really low water and that is downriver of the Tatonduk on a straightaway right before an abrupt left turn in the river, and also, right before Washington Ck. a couple of miles, the water will be ridiculously low. There is also a bad spot after the Nation R. but you can actually see it and hear it if you are paddling, so that shouldn't be a problem.

    a lot of people have problems actually finding Circle. When you are perpendicular to Baldy Mountain, you want to go left. If you find yourself in a maze of islands, you messed up big time. I am guessing that nowadays most people have GPS, so my advice is probably worthless.

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    http://www.nps.gov/applications/fire...fm?postid=4694

    just a fyi, the Marie Creek fire is pushing 10,000 acres and is several miles south of the Yukon in the Washington Creek area. Not sure how active it remains, but you may get a dose of smoke. The link above has fire info that is updated periodically -- meaning less often for ones that are not doing much. The Marie Creek fire was last flown on July 7.

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