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Thread: Living in a log cabin

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    Default Living in a log cabin

    When i was young i always dreamt of living in a log cabin out in the wilderness,just me and my dog,spending my days hunting and fishing but i never did get round to it.Can anyone tell me please,what do they use to seal the gaps between the logs?Thanks

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Permachink is one brand.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    It's interesting you ask, as another forum member and I were just chatting about this lovely cabin above Tustumena Lake. The man who built the cabin had it for 30 years or so. He actually used a knife to carve pieces of would to perfectly fit inside the cracks. Winters are long in AK.........lol

    Some folks will use fiberglass insulation as well. I've seen mosses or tundra used too.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Thanks for that.Must be great living in a log cabin,away from the rat race.

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    What was used to seal the gaps you ask? Well, it depends on how you built your cabin. The old timey cabins, where you alternated big butt end with little butt end, most of the old sourdoughs used mosses, or depending where they were, a mixture of grasses and muddy clayish dirt. It was always an ongoing chore. Always a crack here and there, especially the more the cabin would settle down.
    Alot of these folks up here now, get milled logs. Some are 3 sided, (flat on one side) some are already scribed where there's a groove cut out of the bottom so it'll fit flush on top of the log below it. Then they use the permachink. Some people use it inside and outside.
    Most folks nowadays use fiberglass insulation or strips made just for cabins, then cover the log seams with permachink. That's just commercial log chinking you buy.
    The larger diameter the logs are, and the smaller the cabin, the easier it is to heat and the better it retains the heat.
    The smaller diameter logs, they don't insulate too well.

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by old grizzly View Post
    When i was young i always dreamt of living in a log cabin out in the wilderness,just me and my dog,spending my days hunting and fishing but i never did get round to it.Can anyone tell me please,what do they use to seal the gaps between the logs?Thanks
    Well it depends if you have gaps or not. We live in a scribe fit log home and when we built it we put fiberglass insulation inbetween the logs, specifically whats called sill seal, but the cracks are fairly tight since they are hand fit with a chisel. Not all log cabins and homes are built the same, scribe fit is old school quality.

    P7270738.jpg
    Other than that permachink a material that seals sorta like caulking and is somewhat flexible and looks pretty good too. The old timers used moss as a natural construction material and sometimes wood on top of the moss to cover it up and act as a blocker. But from the evidence I have seen from back in the day, cardboard on the inside of several old cabins was used in an attempt to keep the draft out.

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