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Thread: Hunting boots

  1. #1
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    Default Hunting boots

    I need to get a new pair of hunting boots. I wont be sheep hunting but doing a lot of walking as I look for Moose and Caribou. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Lowa Extremes.

  3. #3
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    Hanwag Alaska GTX is what I have, used them for elk alot, sheep this year

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    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Meindl denalis...im on pair number seven and have no intentions of changing. From sheep rocks to tundra treks, any species, anywhere in the state...i love em. Ive walked out a pair of canada hunters and alaska hunters(both meindl)...i like em both fine but prefer the denalis over any boot ive worn. The only complaint i have is i wish they laced all the way to the toe. I like kenetreks but there soles are way to soft to last me what a pair of meindls will (two springs and a fall or a long fall and one spring)...i just walked out of a pair this spring. Ive been walking in a anew pair on training hikes for two weeks now and a little over a year from now im sure ill be wearing in another pair. Cant say enough about em...

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    Member ADUKHNT's Avatar
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    My all around choice for dang near everything AK except steep climbs is the Muck boot Woodie Max good to -30 for snowmachining and I have killed many critters wearing them. Put over 1000 miles in them on the ATV as well. Poor ankle support for steep terrain.
    I have such a hard time trying to decide which outdoor activity to do every chance I get!! Living in AK is a mental challenge

  6. #6

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    I second the Muck boots, i have the Fieldblazers because they have a thin sole and I can be relatively quiet in them. I think they are the best shoes I have ever had. I wear them everywhere. You slip them on, slip them off, they are super comfortable, they are made ridiculously well, I have had mine for two years and they are still like new. I sold my pair of Whites logging boots, I knew that I would never use them again after a week of wearing the Mucks.

    If I am hunting hogs in the deep woods and swamp, the only time I don't wear my mucks is when i put on a pair of deerskin mocassins or sometimes just a pair of neoprene socks. The hogs are very much in tune with their environment, and it is very hard to sneak up on them. I am talking about real wild razorbacks here, not some recently escaped domestic pigs.

    Once you get used to a pair of Mucks, it is like going from skin tight starched Wranglers to wearing baggy sweat pants. the comfort is just too much, you wonder what on earth you were thinking wearing that uncomfortable stuff.

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    I really enjoy the Muck Woody Max too. Especially in the swampy areas. My feet got a hot in them and thought I could do better for climbing mountainsides. Now I am going to have to reconsider that. I also have the Muck Edge Water camp shoe that I use in and around camp. I love them.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I really don't think you can do wrong with any of the Meindl boots that Cabella's offers. Had I not got such a great deal on a pair of Kenetreks I may have bought another pair. But I mainly got the Kennetreks because I felt I would need them for an upcoming goat hunt. If you only plan on using your boots to hunt moose and caribou with then maybe a good pair of Danners would do you fine.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  9. #9
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
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    My suggestion for lots of walking/hiking after moose and caribou would be a good pair of leather & gore-tex boots. Look for a boot in the 8"-9" height range. This should get you through some of the muck and water yet still give you a boot that's comfortable and supportive to climb to the top of the good glassing hills. They'll also breathe and dry out better than a pair of neoprene Muck boots or something similar. The 8"-9" won't alter your normal stride like a taller boot will, which can result in less fatigue and strain on your knees and calves.

    Kennetrek, Meindl and Lowa are well know for hunting boots but don't feel like you have pick a boot just because it's labeled as a "hunting" boot. A lot of other boot companies make a good leather and gore-tex boot that will fit the bill just as well.

    Try on lots of boots!!! Then make your decision. Actually, if your hunts are by atv or truck bring a leather and a neoprene or rubber boot and give them both a try in the field. Chances are that if you don't like the neoprene/rubbers you'll still get use out of them for other things.

  10. #10
    Member AK DUX's Avatar
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    Lacrosse Burlies is all I use for everything except sheep.
    "We're all here cuz we're not all there"

  11. #11

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    I like my Danner Proghorns. You can get them in different insulation thickness depending on how cold you feet will get. They are comfortable (no break-in period for mine) and work well when walking through wet stuff. The only time mine got wet on the inside is when the river bank dropped out from under me while pushing the hovercraft off the bank. Needless to say, I almost took a complete swim. So as long as you don't go over the top, their solid.

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    consider looking at any of the following, all have or do serve me well: scarpa rio or sl, asolo 535 or danner mtn light. All these fall into the mid 200$ upto 300$ range but with some care will last a LONG time.

  13. #13

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    When hunting moose and caribou I have spent more time in a pair of 10" uninsulated LL Bean shoe packs with the lug sole then any other boots. Seems like no matter what I wear I eventually get my feet wet.

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    I've had a pair of kennetrek mtn extremes for the past 3 yrs, very solid boot. take awhile to break in but they are comfy and dry. a little expensive but you get what you pay for.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tastybearmeat View Post
    I've had a pair of kennetrek mtn extremes for the past 3 yrs, very solid boot. take awhile to break in but they are comfy and dry. a little expensive but you get what you pay for.
    I just bought a pair of these for dirt cheap through Sierra Trading Post. If you think you may want another pair then you may want to jump on these. If so send me a pm and I'll give you details on how to get an extra BIG discount...
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  16. #16
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    The kennetreks work well for some but for me the leather got wet and they would stretch to the point I couldn't get them tight The torsional rigidity wasn't what I would like out of a pair of expensive mountaineering boots and the ankle support is gone after three years of use. A fresh coat of aqueous wax at the beginning of each season though and they still look almost new. Just some notes from my three years and multiple mountain hunts with these boots.

  17. #17
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    The kennetreks work well for some but for me the leather got wet and they would stretch to the point I couldn't get them tight The torsional rigidity wasn't what I would like out of a pair of expensive mountaineering boots and the ankle support is gone after three years of use. A fresh coat of aqueous wax at the beginning of each season though and they still look almost new. Just some notes from my three years and multiple mountain hunts with these boots.
    Put it this way....if I had to pay top dollar for them at Sportsman's, I wouldn't have bought them. But for the price I paid I couldn't pass it up. They seem at least as good as any Meindl I have had. I've only worn them once so far so I can't critique them as of yet. Most reviews that I have read all rate them pretty good.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  18. #18
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I don't mean to disparage your new boots or your great deal. My kennetreks are the best all around hunting boots I have ever tried. They have never leaked a drop or give me a blister and literally still look darn near new. A set of green superfeet helped some with the stretching issue though they make for a really tight initial fit till they get wet and loosen up. For any mixed terrain hunting I don't think you can beat them however as a dedicated mountain hunting boot they lack some features that I see as imperative for me. I get occasional PM's from both people who have them and love them as well as the occasional "I wish I had seen your review prior to purchasing" or "I wish I would have listened to your review". I plan to try hanwaggs next year.

  19. #19
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Check the archives - for me MEINDL CANADA BOOTS
    "Actions speak louder than words - 'nough said"

  20. #20
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I don't mean to disparage your new boots or your great deal. My kennetreks are the best all around hunting boots I have ever tried. They have never leaked a drop or give me a blister and literally still look darn near new. A set of green superfeet helped some with the stretching issue though they make for a really tight initial fit till they get wet and loosen up. For any mixed terrain hunting I don't think you can beat them however as a dedicated mountain hunting boot they lack some features that I see as imperative for me. I get occasional PM's from both people who have them and love them as well as the occasional "I wish I had seen your review prior to purchasing" or "I wish I would have listened to your review". I plan to try hanwaggs next year.
    Like I said, even though I've only worn them on one trip, it's hard to believe now that the rigidity of these boots would soften up that much and loose ankle support. But if they do, like they seem to have done on you, then I can understand your point. Personally, for a mountain boot, rigidity is of utmost concern to me as well. I don't remember my Meindls as being this rigid, and they performed well for me. Other than a dedicated mountaineering boot, which to me means pretty much a mountain climbing boot like those worn by mountain climbers themselves, or going to plastic, I really believe we can only ask so much from a leather boot. One year I wore a mountaineering (climbing) boot on a sheep hunt. You remember the old waffle stompers type boots: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/ali...colorFamily=05 These are what I am referring to when I say a dedicated mountaineering boot. Although not gore-tex they were fantastic in the shale and while side hilling. But unfortunately they were a little small for me, and because the leather is SO thick and rigid, I ended up loosing my big toe nail later on, after the constant pounding it received while coming back down the mountain with a ram on my back. I actually believe these are the best "leather" boot a guy can wear on a sheep or goat hunt. But I went with the Kenetreks mainly for, as you said, a good all around hunting boot. I needed something for my upcoming goat hunt and they seemed to fit the bill. BTW........I got mine for $221.00 shipped to the PO. Can't hardly buy any decent boot for around that price, much less these Kenetreks.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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