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Thread: Outhouse toilet pedestal

  1. #1
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    Default Outhouse toilet pedestal

    We've made our first journey to our just purchased remote cabin on the Yentna. Next trip is next week, and one of my first jobs is construction of the outhouse. I've had a "request" for a pedestal type seat. Is there a place local to Anchorage, Palmer, or Wasilla where one can be purchased? If not, I guess I'll be ordering one and waiting until later to complete. Any suggestions would help me impress the Mrs.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Is the Mrs. going to use this outhouse in the winter? If so, plan on having to remove that pedestal and replace it with a flat top box seat, so she can put a sheet of nice warm styrofoam board on top of it , just like the neighbors have.
    He who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors. ~Thomas Jefferson

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    This going to be primarily a summer cabin. If we decide to make a pilgrimage in the winter, I'll provide a styrofoam covering for the seat.

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    We use a plastic sump pump basin that you can pick up at Lowes or Home Depot in Anchorage. Turn it upside down, cut a hole in the bottom (now the top). Pick your favorite toliet seat while you are at one of the big box stores and bolt that on. The rim on the basin is perfect for bolting down to the floor of the outhouse. The plastic is thick and the whole thing is pretty secure. Maybe $40-45 bucks total.

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    Hey, thanks. I'll check that out.

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    Purchase a plastic outhouse from the local provider(we got ours from rent a can in Wasilla $450)Cut the bottom out, place it over the hole and you have a wonderful outhouse.. Will never build another outhouse!

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    PORT A JON....got to love those..lol

    Not a bad idea if done right..even has the vent pole. Maybe add some form of foundation to attach it to.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1875XA View Post
    Purchase a plastic outhouse from the local provider(we got ours from rent a can in Wasilla $450)Cut the bottom out, place it over the hole and you have a wonderful outhouse.. Will never build another outhouse!
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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1875XA View Post
    Purchase a plastic outhouse from the local provider(we got ours from rent a can in Wasilla $450)Cut the bottom out, place it over the hole and you have a wonderful outhouse.. Will never build another outhouse!
    Yeah, and as a bonus whit them babies ya can git instant color coordination....
    git ya uh blue one and it'l match yer tarps!
    He who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors. ~Thomas Jefferson

  9. #9
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    My outhouse seat is a conventional toilet seat with removable fake fur covers. Keep a few around to rotate so you won't miss it when one goes into the laundry. The bench is a wood structure capped with a length of pre-formed plam counter top. Easy to clean. Under the wood bench the "hole" is defined by a plastic fuel drum with the bottom cut out and enough of the top cut out to not interfere with the toilet hole but enough left to attach the drum to the wood bench. Again, easy to clean. There's no reason not to make your outhouse nice. Panel it, paint it, decorate it. It beats the heck out of a dirty shed.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Yeah, and as a bonus whit them babies ya can git instant color coordination....
    git ya uh blue one and it'l match yer tarps!
    Actually I got a brown one...blends right in with the trees...

  11. #11
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    My outhouse is made from logs, and I have a sphagnum moss roof. The roof over hangs 4 feet in the front and covers my porch, which has pole banisters. The door is a dutch style, with a screen on the top for summer time. But the door will open in one piece. There is a double pained window in the top door also.

    The toilet seat is 3'' pink board insulation for the winter time. If it gets 'dirty', it cleans easily and a little sandpaper goes along way. It is cut and shaped just like a toilet seat. There is also a solid cover lid. If it is -60*F below zero, it is still warm. I also have a nice hand carved wooden toilet seat I can use in the summer.

    I used 2- 55 gal steel drums, welded one on top of the other. The bottom one has holes punched in it for drainage. It sets on about a foot of gravel. The barrels keep the pit sides from caving in.
    The seat is box type, not pedestal, made from 2x6's and plywood. I insulated it with blue-board.
    There is also a urinal for the guys, that drains right into the pit, but only for the summer time. It has a lid also, and a screen. The urinal is made from a spruce round.
    I vented the outhouse with 3" black pvc pipe on the south side so the sun keeps it warm so it draws really good. The pipe runs above the roof and has an elbow covered by screen to keep any bugs out.
    I have a small trash burner wood stove in there as well. Wood box is right inside the door.
    I keep a pan in there so you fill it with snow in the winter, and put it on the stove while your using the library doing research from the various hunting, fishing, camping, trapping, gardening magazines found in a magazine rack. By the time your through with the research, the snow is melted you have some warm water to wash with. There is also a lantern and candles. A small cabinet for toiletries and hand towels. And a mirror above the sink, that drains into the pit.

    By the door is a gun rack with a 12 ga. Mossberg pump. Years ago I got caught in the outhouse one night by a bull moose that was between me and the cabin. It was about -30*F below. I almost froze to death in the 2 1/2 hours if took for that moose to leave. I couldn't get by it to get back to the cabin! I said never again. So, there is always a shotgun hanging by the door. And, it could be a bear next time.

    I also have a small window on the west side towards the woods with inside and outside shutters.

    I have a 5 gallon steel tank I fill with water, which is mounted on a shelf outside, in the summer time. A pipe runs from it to the sink which has water shut off. It drains right into the pit. The sun warms the water up pretty good.

    In the summer, I feed it with garden scraps once or twice, and once a summer with a scoop of septic culture. I've never had bad smells, and since it's a tight building with screens and it's vented and the the toilet has good lids, it's very effective.

    I have flowers growing around it and flowers on the porch and flowers hanging from the porch roof.

    If I had a large family, I would put paper bags in there, and have everyone put their paper in the paper bag and burn it. But for one person, it's not necessary.

  12. #12
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    Default Just barely got started

    Due to work on the foundation, we just barely got started on the outhouse. The outhouse is one of main goals for our next trip out. The wife actually dug out the hole that was started by the previous owner.
    outhouse const 05.jpgouthouse const 02.JPG

  13. #13
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    Default Barrel setting

    On the advice of our neighbor, we are going to build the outhouse up due to the snow levels. Floor will be on top of the barrel. with pedestal on top of that.

    outhouse const 09.jpgouthouse const 06.jpg

    Next will be the posts. I plan on the building to be 4'x4'. Haven't decided on height yet.

  14. #14
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    Red face More photos - almost done.

    Well, our last trip out was complicated by boat problems and near constant rain. However, we managed to get the outhouse in the dry. I used sump basins for a pedestal and funnel, but I think I'm going to cut it off a little, put a plywood bench to cover it, and then mount the toilet seat. In the winter, we can just lift the lid and seat and use foam board. Right now our feet are off the ground if you sit on it. Still to come: the door, vent pipe, a small window, insulation, paneling, vinyl flooring, trim boards, and paint/stain. Eventually I'll redo the steps; the ones there are the old ones off the cabin.

    At least we've done away with using the bucket


    IMG_1601.jpg IMG_1604.jpg

  15. #15

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    If you plumb in for a propane gas light about half way up the wall and build a shelf for the tank you will be surprised how warm it will keep it inside. By putting the light lower it will help heat the lower part and with the tank up it will help keep the pressure up. I also use one of the radiant heaters that fasten to the propane bottles to heat things up when first arriving in the winter .then just turn that off and adjust the light down some and let it go 24-7 as long as we are there. The B/Q type bottles will last a long time with just the light on it. Also I tie a small rope on the bottle on the shelf so that there is no chance for it to fall .

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