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Thread: Trapping in the Soldotna/Kenai area

  1. #1
    Member agoyne's Avatar
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    Default Trapping in the Soldotna/Kenai area

    Hello, I am moving to Soldotna/Kenai area in December. I was wanting to back into trapping again. I'm from Arkansas and I used to catch beavers, coon, possums, yotes, rabbits, and muskrats. I am really want to get into snaring. I've only used steel traps and its been a long time. I'm 40 and I was a teenager when I had my lines. I don't want to take anybody's spots but where would be a good place for me to scout and look around? I would pretty much be walking until I can get my 4wheeler and Argo up there or buy a snow machine.

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    Pre welcome to the state! You will have some good trapping out that way but it will be hard on foot, not impossible. Don't have any spots to give you just thoughts. First season since your coming in late you may want to focus on finding area and not tapping. I spend as much time in the Pre season scouting and Pre setting as I do in the season actually trapping. Start researching how to trap in snow. It has a learning curve. I like to use wax paper. Snares are great, my choice is a 1/16x19, lots of guys will jump up to 3/32 if there in heavy yote area. You will find a snow machine will be very helpful. Good luck in your move.

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    Member agoyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacherman View Post
    Pre welcome to the state! You will have some good trapping out that way but it will be hard on foot, not impossible. Don't have any spots to give you just thoughts. First season since your coming in late you may want to focus on finding area and not tapping. I spend as much time in the Pre season scouting and Pre setting as I do in the season actually trapping. Start researching how to trap in snow. It has a learning curve. I like to use wax paper. Snares are great, my choice is a 1/16x19, lots of guys will jump up to 3/32 if there in heavy yote area. You will find a snow machine will be very helpful. Good luck in your move.

    Yeah, that's what I was kinda thinking. Just get out there and do some looking around. At $250 for a non-resident, its really not worth setting a line with such a short time left on everything except muskrat. Plus I work 31 days out of the country and home only 25 days, so I won't have much time after I move in Dec. I've been watching the wild north videos on youtube. That's helping me with trapping in the snow and variables like in Alaska. Thanks for the reply.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    If any of your trapping plans involve the wildlife refuge you need to take their trapping class and sign up at the refuge headquarters every year before the season starts. The refuge also has some special regs that pertain to trapping there which are explained in the class.
    I don't trap but know a some guys who do. Anyplace you could access to trap on foot is probably being trapped already to some extent.
    Without a snowmachine (and even with one) Your options may be limited in finding an area not already part of someones lines.
    Most of the trapping land around the Peninsula is on the wildlife refuge so access can be a problem as in no motors or wheeled devices in the wilderness parts of the refuge. That means foot only in many areas and in other areas it is only open to snowmachines after they have deemed there was adequate snow cover and officially opened it.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Member agoyne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    If any of your trapping plans involve the wildlife refuge you need to take their trapping class and sign up at the refuge headquarters every year before the season starts. The refuge also has some special regs that pertain to trapping there which are explained in the class.
    I don't trap but know a some guys who do. Anyplace you could access to trap on foot is probably being trapped already to some extent.
    Without a snowmachine (and even with one) Your options may be limited in finding an area not already part of someones lines.
    Most of the trapping land around the Peninsula is on the wildlife refuge so access can be a problem as in no motors or wheeled devices in the wilderness parts of the refuge. That means foot only in many areas and in other areas it is only open to snowmachines after they have deemed there was adequate snow cover and officially opened it.

    What about between Tustumena Lake and Clam Gulch or back towards Sterling way? Is that area crowded also. I don't mind driving a ways.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agoyne View Post
    What about between Tustumena Lake and Clam Gulch or back towards Sterling way? Is that area crowded also. I don't mind driving a ways.
    I know a guy who traps out Sterling way and have seen others tending beaver traps while ice fishing out that way.
    I know of a trapper who traps with a partner around Tustumena lake. They are very good from what I have heard.
    I have met some trappers in the Kasilof Clam Gulch area while snowmachining out that way but don't know where they were trapping at. Seemed like some nice guys though. I believe it was a father and son.
    Also I have seen trappers in Cooper Landing while out that way.
    I was fishing out there and he went past with some traps bouncing around in his sled he was towing with his snowmachine.
    All those areas contain lots of Refuge land so you would be wise to take the class and sign up yearly.
    When I had the class it was pretty informative.well worth taking.
    The refuge people would also have some info on established traplines.
    Also you could check with the new store Peninsula trapping supply. They might have some good info on where others are trapping.
    Wherever you decide to go expect experienced competition.

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    Member nooksack's Avatar
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    Attend a few Kenai Pen. trappers assc. meetings and ask around. You have to attend the orientation to trap the refuge and they can steer you clear of others lines. The truth is it takes hard work and if you want to invest in that you can find areas that will easily cover your $250 plus some in fur. Lynx doesn't open until Jan. 1st, even a handful of brown cats will bring in a few dollars. I know of plenty of areas that are not trapped but you have to find those your self that is how it works. You can ask here and be told where not to trap but not where to trap.

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