Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Who's to blame?

  1. #1
    Guest
    Guest

    Default Who's to blame?

    http://www.adn.com/2012/06/23/251757...is-rooted.html

    Seems like a lot of the blame is on the "bycatch" and commercial fisherman going after cod and pollock so that Mickey D's can serve their Mcfish. Just curious on others thoughts on the subject?

  2. #2
    New member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Hiya,
    Probbably lots of scenarios came together to that point. But in generally I would say the biggest scenario came from the too little controlled commercial fishing. More than that I assume it is also political self made problem. Mrs. P... should now it better....
    Instead of blaming the sport fishing alaskan fish & game should not any longer consider to resctrict the commercial fishing they should do it NOW. Sport fishing concerns alot of small business and small people, this is probably to little lobby for the politicians to act immediately to tap the full potential and to restrict this commercial fishing. In general alaskan fish & game do a very good job but they should make more pressure to the political part and the commercial fisheries. That's not easy as this - I assume - is a huge lobby. Greeting from Europe & I would ask for your indulgence for my grammar and for interfere into your forum.

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Question No one knows . . .

    Who or what's to blame? Truth is they haven't a clue:

    "Whether it's changes in the ocean environment, competitor species, climate change, bycatch in marine fisheries or a combination of all of them, the marine waters is where the hole in this bucket is," Delaney said.
    —from an article in today's Anchorage Daily News




  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FishAddictAK View Post
    http://www.adn.com/2012/06/23/251757...is-rooted.html

    Seems like a lot of the blame is on the "bycatch" and commercial fisherman going after cod and pollock so that Mickey D's can serve their Mcfish. Just curious on others thoughts on the subject?
    Could be good old Mother Nature is to blame. Here is a quote clipped from an Alaska Dispatch article:


    There is a widespread belief in Western Alaska that faltering king salmon runs are due to the bycatch of salmon in offshore fisheries for pollock and other bottomfish. There is little evidence to back up that belief. It appears more likely Alaska king runs are in decline because those of the Pacific Northwest are on the rise. There is a long, historic tie between these fisheries that has been documented back as far as about 1900. When one is on the rise, the other is in decline.

    Alaska bounty ending?

    "They're dealing with record returns" in the Pacific Northwest, Regnart noted, while king salmon runs appear weak all over Alaska. This has happened before. Researchers in 1997 quoted the September 1915 issue of "Pacific Fisherman" magazine on the subject. "Never before have the Bristol Bay (Alaska) salmon packers returned to port after the season's operations so early,'' the magazine reported in the same issue that said, "The spring (chinook salmon) fishing season on the Columbia River (Washington and Oregon) closed at noon on Aug. 25, and proved to be one of the best for some years.'' Nathan Mantau from the University of Washington's Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Oceans, along with other scientists, tracked this phenomenon oscillating between Alaska and the Northwest throughout the 20th century.

  5. #5
    Member ysr_racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Happily in So Cal.
    Posts
    583

    Default

    It doesn't matter who's to blame, the real question is what do they do about it?
    brad g.
    So Cal, USA
    Visit my Sporting Clays website
    http://www.ysr-racer.com

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Question Time will tell . . nothing else will . . .

    "We're in a period of low abundance and low returns, statewide, and whether it's from Southeast, Copper River, Cook Inlet, Kodiak, Nushagak, Yukon, we're just in this period of low productivity in the ocean," said Ricky Gease, a biologist and director of the Kenai River Sportfishing Association.

    —from the ADN article referenced above
    Well, maybe and maybe not . . no one knows for sure. It's quite understandable that those with vested interests in the river's commercial sport-fishery would be inclined and want to portray Alaska's current king salmon decline as merely cyclical and that things will get better in years to come.

    Well, maybe and maybe not.

    Time will tell . . wishful thinking has no place in the current state of affairs. We all know the old saying, "Wish in one hand, p*ss in the other. See which gets full first."



  7. #7

    Smile

    Low cycles happen. In the meantime we conserve the brood stock and wait on ocean conditions to improve for us. I would think all would be encouraged by the strengthening chinook runs in the Pacific NW.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Lightbulb Hope springs eternal . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by extrema View Post
    Low cycles happen. In the meantime we conserve the brood stock and wait on ocean conditions to improve for us. I would think all would be encouraged by the strengthening chinook runs in the Pacific NW.
    Yes, low cycles happen . . snowshoe rabbits and all that.

    But so does extinction . . . Steller's sea cows, mammoths, and all that.

    Hope for the best, prepare for the worst . . .

  9. #9
    Guest
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
    It doesn't matter who's to blame, the real question is what do they do about it?
    True, but hopefully they can find the root cause of the problem. This would be key in actually "fixing" the issue.

  10. #10
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Who, they, someone, those guys, us, me.
    All has a common thread don't it.
    Humans
    Stop consuming more fish than mother nature can produce, the decline is not rocket science, the solution is.
    Whales, cod, crab, herring, PNW salmon, etc. What happened to them?
    Tip if the iceberg, IMO.
    We are only good at crisis management, & not very good at that.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •