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Thread: is their any way to fix a crunched spot in a fly rod?

  1. #1
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    Default is their any way to fix a crunched spot in a fly rod?

    The answer is probably no, but I have to ask. I have an old Fenwick 2 peice 7wt that my kid accidentaly crunched a spot on. it is on the upper half of the rod just above the part that slips down onto the lower half. Any way to wrap it and glue it or is it toast?

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    I broke an old Fenwick 5 wt yrs ago and cut above the break, wrapped with nylon thread over it to make it fit back into the ferrule that I had cleaned out and epoxied it. It wasn't perfect (or pretty) but it worked enough to hang on to the rod.

    There are enough rod savy guys on these forums that I am sure someone will have a good idea.

    (I still have 2 old 5 wt Fenwick noodle sticks)

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    OLD Fenwicks will probably not be replaced under warrenty, BUT Fenwick will give you a good deal on a new rod - I think I got 65% off the new rod I chose. Contact Fenwick.

  4. #4

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    Yes and no. Back "in the day," as in the 1960's and 70's I worked in fly shops and built rods for a living. Part of that was repairs.

    For a mild crush like yours, the best solution was to have a short section of the same or very similar blank that could be slipped and glued into place INSIDE the blank. It made it a little stiffer right there, but was a quick an easy fix. We used to get Lamiglass "seconds" blanks by the bundle of 100 for not much more than the price of postage. Many a Fenwick was repaired with Lamiglass blank piece in those days.

    If you have any old broken rods laying around, take a mike to them and find a section that matches your crush. Cut off a piece 4-6" long and sand it lightly to rough the finish. Push the piece onto another compatible section of blank long enough to reach your crush spot. Coat the short section of roughed up blank with rubber cement (I've always used Barge) and shove it firmly up into place extending on either the crush. Let dry 24 hours.

    Depending on the degree of the crush, it might be a good idea to do a section of thread wraps right over the crush, then finish as you would any thread wrap.

    No it won't be pristine, but it will certainly be a reliable repair that makes the rod useable again.

  5. #5
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    Well given the advice here I think I will be able to repair it, and I appreciate the responses.

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